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A Few Ideas

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(based on 134 reviews)

Boredom is the enemy of education. These resources aim to give students an engaging, fun way into topics that are relevant to their lives, including awkward ones like sex education, and informing about issues that are shaping the world and their future. My hope is that they help be an effective tool to the teacher to wake up a hunger for knowledge in students, and that everyone in the classroom would have a more enjoyable and enriching experience because of their use.

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Boredom is the enemy of education. These resources aim to give students an engaging, fun way into topics that are relevant to their lives, including awkward ones like sex education, and informing about issues that are shaping the world and their future. My hope is that they help be an effective tool to the teacher to wake up a hunger for knowledge in students, and that everyone in the classroom would have a more enjoyable and enriching experience because of their use.
Pacifism
DavidFewDavidFew

Pacifism

(1)
A lesson to explore what pacifism is, how it has been used in the past and if it is a reasonable attitude to take to war. Looking particularly at the Quakers and their use of pacifism in anti-war protests and campaigning, the lesson aims to engage students in active critical thought and improve their awareness of how belief manifests in the real world. Learning Objectives: What is Pacifism? What is a conscientious objector? How did people treat conscientious objectors in WWI and II? Why might a religious person refuse to fight? Should we ALL be pacifists? It also includes links to youtube videos on conscience and examples of conscientious objectors for students to explore. It also includes, for more able students, examples of people who ‘broke the mold’ such as Dietrich Bonhoeffer.
Islamophobia
DavidFewDavidFew

Islamophobia

(0)
A lesson which aims to mythbust many of the global misconceptions about Islam which has led to widespread islamophobia. It focuses mainly on the UK but is globally relevant, and aims to expose the media bias against Muslims, how a tiny minority of people who claim the title of ‘Muslim’ have taken control of the narrative of what it is to be Muslim, and how we can address this. Learning questions include: Identify the meaning of Islamophobia? What are some of the myths surrounding Islam and Muslims? What would be an appropriate response? Why is Islamophobia on the rise? It includes a range of activities, from group work, discussion, individual writeen work and youtube videos. Tasks are differentiated by outcome, and is currently targeted at KS3-4 students. With tweeking it could easily be made into a KS2 resource, as it also includes Muslim art for students to make an anti-Islamophobia wall. I have intentionally put too much into this so you can prune out whatever you wish to.
Crime and Punishment: Born Evil? Case Studies (Fred and Rose West, James Bulger,  Josef Fritzl)
DavidFewDavidFew

Crime and Punishment: Born Evil? Case Studies (Fred and Rose West, James Bulger, Josef Fritzl)

(1)
This is a set of resources for year 9 and up, and should not be used for students any younger. The objectives are to describe a case study of evil (the largest powerpoint focusses mainly of Jamie Bulger, but the resources can be adapted to look at any of the topics). There are 13 resources here, with evidence students can evaluate from each example. There are also 'Must, should, could' guidance as well as plenty of opportunity for extension of gifted and talented students. Good links to Citizenship, religious studies, Sociology, and the activities are pretty self explanatory. Radio show links, videos included. This is a pretty harrowing subject to teach, but sometimes students seem to be particularly interested in real life examples and applications. When discussing things like Capital Punishment it seems particularly helpful to bring into relief the truly horrible things people do sometimes, and how a responsible society should respond.
Religious Attitudes to Alcohol and Drugs
DavidFewDavidFew

Religious Attitudes to Alcohol and Drugs

(0)
A powerpoint with embedded documentary about Alcohol use which is really good. It also has a venn diagram which compares Christian and Muslim attitudes to alcohol and drug use. Finishing with a discussion based plenary, this is an engaging, differentiated by activity and outcome lesson that explores the tricky world of drug and alcohol use. Objectives explored include What is a drug? Is alcohol a drug and what are its effects? What do Muslims and Christians believe about drugs? What is your opinion on drugs?
Nuclear War
DavidFewDavidFew

Nuclear War

(0)
This lesson explores Nuclear war: the affects of nuclear weapons, if they can ever be justified, if there are any specific examples students know of, and how Christians might respond to the idea of nuclear war using the just war theory. SEND worksheet included, and a variety of extension activities (including how to make a peace crane) are included. As well as this, youtube videos and plenty of discussion activities, as well as an online ‘nuke map’ which explains how a nuke would affect the area you are, anywhere in the world. I know, right? An amazing resource. Learning Questions: What do Nuclear weapons do? Can Nuclear War ever be just? Are there any examples you know? How may Christians respond to Nuclear war?
Judaism 2) Prayer in the Home
DavidFewDavidFew

Judaism 2) Prayer in the Home

(0)
This lesson is part of a scheme of work on Judaism, aimed at KS2-3 students. The objectives it covers are: To know and understand the main symbols of prayer in the home To think about what is most important in my life, and write a short prayer or poem about it and create a symbol for it It includes the main symbols used by Jews in prayer, including the Tefillin, Mezuzah, Kippah and Tallit. Ideally you would have these in the classroom and be able to dress up a student in them. There’s also a song including of the Shema, the main prayer of Judaism. Differentiated comprehension questions, a range of activities, and information slides to help students get to grips with how Jews may worship in the home. Worksheets also included.
The Causes of Crime
DavidFewDavidFew

The Causes of Crime

(0)
A lesson to explore the psychological, social and environmental causes of crime. It includes youtube clips, 'a recipe for a criminal', and other creative activites that become increasingly challenging. A well differentiated lesson that is fun to deliver. Lessons include: What are the possible causes of crime? How do environmental, social and psychological factors influence crime? What do you think are the main causes of crime and why?
9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace
DavidFewDavidFew

9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace

(0)
This lesson has been a long one in the making. Having found resources from all over the web, edited my own video compiling footage from 9.11 and interviews from Geroge Bush and Osama Bin Laden, this lesson aims to give as an impartial view of 9.11 as possible. It includes neo-conservative explanations for 9.11, to Noam CHomsky esque critique of American Foreign Policy that Michael Moore would be proud of, and even allows al-Qaeda to explain their opinion. Obviously it makes explicit that targetting civilians is never, under any circumstances, acceptable, but tries to explain that 9.11 was a complicated event with historical, cultural, social and religious causes using a redacted and edited document which summarises complicated historical commentary into a digestible PDF. It even includes a brief mention of conspiracy theories for those more inquisitive students. Above all, it encourages critical thought and human compassion. A wide range of differentiated and extension activities here. Learning Questions: What was 9/11? How did it cause a war? Why did the the USA and al-Qaeda say it happened? Ext: Why do you think it happened? Independent, group and whole class activities included to bolster engagement and learning. There’s enough for at least 2 lessons here. But I’m selling it as one, because I’m nice like that.
Religion and Science: The Creation Story
DavidFewDavidFew

Religion and Science: The Creation Story

(0)
A powerpoint, with flash embedded slides that narrate the creation story and youtube videos discussing different opinions on the creation story. This lesson aims to encourage debate and students to explore their own opinions on creation, evolution and if the two theories could be compatible. An SEND alternative included here too. Learning Questions and Objectives: Comparing the Big Bang and Christian ideas of Creation (Level 3-4 Commmunicate) With scientific understanding of the Big Bang, is it still possible to think of a creator God? (level 4-5 Enquire) Why is there something rather than nothing? (level 5 Evaluate)
Religious Attitudes to Capital Punishment
DavidFewDavidFew

Religious Attitudes to Capital Punishment

(0)
A differentiated resource, complete with worksheets and independent a scaffolded role-play task where students take on the role of Muslim, Christian or Atheist response to Capital Punishment. Intended to enable students to explore their own opinions about Capital Punishment using religious views as a springboard, this resource should stretch and challenge a range of ability levels. 1.What do Muslims and Christians say about Capital punishment? 2. How do people in the same religion disagree with each other? EXT: Why do people in the same religion disagree with each other?
Breaking up: ending relationships well
DavidFewDavidFew

Breaking up: ending relationships well

(1)
A PHSE lesson to help students discuss and explore healthy ways to end relationships. It’s an attempt to try and get secondary school students in particular to treat each other with respect when everything seems epically painful. Differentiated by outcome, with plenty of opportunities for discussion and exploration with some youtube links included.
The Hajj
DavidFewDavidFew

The Hajj

(4)
A lesson, more like two really, exploring what the Hajj is, why people do it, and how the Hajj effects Muslims. They hyperlinks in the PPT (image link on second slide and last slide) are to two excellent videos. Ext: why do different Muslims go on Hajj for different reasons?
Do Miracles still happen?
DavidFewDavidFew

Do Miracles still happen?

(0)
A resource with embedded video clips, group tasks, differentiated activities and resources as well as mini plenaries. Plenty for students to get their intellectual/philosophical teeth into. There are also a range of miracles to look at: if you would like to explore the miracles of Jesus more then there are resources which look specifically at those, whilst there are also a range of more 'modern' Miracles, like crying statues, floating brooms lambs with 'allah' appearing in their coat and people being cured of cancer. From the sublime to the ridiculous, I know. Learning Objectives: To understand what a miracle is To know some examples of Miracles To think about if I believe miracles can happen Links well to religious studies GCSE and KS3 groups, as well as compulsory GCSE sets. I use it in conjunction with my science and religion module to exemplify that much of what we do today with science would have once been considered miraculous.
ENTIRE Immortality Scheme of Work
DavidFewDavidFew

ENTIRE Immortality Scheme of Work

(0)
An entire scheme of work on Immortality for Religious Studies GCSE. Including powerpoints, worksheets, activities, revision resources and clips, plenty to keep your kids interested, entertained and immersed in an educational experience. Shaped around the AQA Religious Studies B syllabus 1) What is reality 2) The evidence for immortality (NDEs and Reincarnation Stories) 3) Religious Attitudes 4) Scriptures and Life After Death (LaD) 5) The Resurrection 6) Muslim attitudes to the Resurrection 7) Paranormal Activity and Evidence for Life after Death 8) Revision 9) Revision 2
Gender and Sexuality
DavidFewDavidFew

Gender and Sexuality

(0)
Gender and sexuality can be confusing for students (and teachers!), many of whom do not understand the idea of gender being a spectrum rather than a binary role connected to biological sex. Indeed, most do not understand that gender and sex are different things. This presentation aims to present the different arguments around gender, varying from people who feel that their gender is different from their biological sex (transgender) or those who are biologically intersex (about 1-2% of the global population). It acknowledges that some people are very closed to the idea of transgenderism, whilst acknowledging the biological fact of intersex. It includes and article about Caster Semenya, the South African runner banned from competing in events because her testosterone is too high and told she would need to take medication to address this, as well as youtube videos, graphics, group discussion activities, opinion lines/corners, and written comprehension questions. There are also definition tasks too. Ideal for KS3-5 students. (11-18yr old) A range of tasks that will not fit into an hour, so pick which work for you. Learning questions include: What is gender? What is the difference between ‘intersex’, ‘transgender’, ‘transexual’ and ‘non-binary’? What is a ‘patriarchy’? Is gender a choice? Is gender a spectrum? This is a new resource on a tricky issue: feedback warmly, warmly welcomed. Many thanks.
Humanism
DavidFewDavidFew

Humanism

(1)
A lesson that explores what Humanism is, including descriptions, embedded videos, exploration of controversy surrounding Richard Dawkins and independent learning activities and discussions. Also, for the creatives out there, an extension which involves writing a rap. Learning questions include: What is Humanism? What do Humanists believe? What are the challenges of believing in Humanism? Extension: Is Humanism a religion? This is intended to help students explore and think with nuance about Humanism, the role of religion in the modern world (if indeed it has any), and is differentiated in its tasks: each question gets increasingly difficult and there are differentiated targets for video clips and activities.
Science and Religion: The Big Bang
DavidFewDavidFew

Science and Religion: The Big Bang

(0)
A lesson for KS3 students to get their heads around the Big Bang and if it is compatible with religious beliefs. Can one believe in God and the Big Bang? This includes videos about the big bang, the size of the universe and a short powerpoint with pictures of earth to play while students enter to create that SMSC 'awe and wonder' feeling. Also included are instructions in the PPT on how to teach and youtube links. Learning Questions: What is the Big Bang theory? What is my opinion about how the universe was created? Is it possible to believe in religion AND science? Great for SMSC, Religious Studies, and Science and Religion modules.
Medical Ethics 5: Genetic Engineering
DavidFewDavidFew

Medical Ethics 5: Genetic Engineering

(0)
A lesson which explores and explains genetic engineering, looking at some specific examples (such as glow in the dark mice) as well as a case study activity. It builds on previous lessons on religious attitudes to medical ethics particularly well, but also stands alone. Learning Objectives are: To know the difference between: Genetic Screening & Genetic Engineering To evaluate religious arguments about genetic screening and engineering To develop my own opinion on these technologies. Starters and plenaries included with activities differentiated by outcome.
Nelson Mandela, an overview
DavidFewDavidFew

Nelson Mandela, an overview

(31)
A PPT with a variety of extensions to give students an idea about what all the fuss is about. The PPT itself is pretty self explanatory, and contains links to a variety of youtube videos (some are animations) as well as the Specials 'Free Nelson Mandela&' single. What a legend!
Pornography and its problems
DavidFewDavidFew

Pornography and its problems

(12)
This is a PPT about pornography. Awkward. On average, young men are exposed to it before they're 10. It can lead to all kinds of personal problems, let alone drastic effects on the social way sex is perceived. Tis is an attempt to educate young people about the health and social effects of pornography, and how drastically in can improve people's lives if they give it up. It has been designed in a way that is flexible to your teaching: print off slides, do presentations, information treasure hunts...up to you! Where do you stand is an activity where each corner of the room is a different opinion (Strongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree) and students move to the corner and discuss. WARNING: DEFINITELY WATCH THE VIDEOS BEFORE YOU SHOW IT TO THE KIDS! Some of this material may be suitable only for sixth form.