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I've been teaching 8 years in Greater Manchester and Cheshire, and spent some time teaching in South America and India. I've trained as a CELTA, have been a TA and have in the past also been a team leader.

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I've been teaching 8 years in Greater Manchester and Cheshire, and spent some time teaching in South America and India. I've trained as a CELTA, have been a TA and have in the past also been a team leader.
Fake News

Fake News

A powerpoint which includes differentiation activities, a worksheet (with different activities for KS3 or 4 which we print on double sided A3, and there is enough here for at least 2 lessons. Youtube links, treasure hunts, a debate, TPS activity and more. Easily personalisable to suit your own needs, and included here is the SMSC objectives met with this lesson. The Powerpoint itself has some instructions on how to use the resource, although most of it is quite self explanatory. Enjoy!
DavidFew
The six aims of punishment

The six aims of punishment

A lesson to explore the six aims of punishment: protection, retribution, vindication, deterrence, reformation and reparation. It includes discussions on what crimes should receive what punishment, learning walks and written exercises which increase in difficulty. Writing scaffolding for paragraphs are included on the powerpoint, and it will help students studying religious studies, history and citizenship. Learning questions: What are the six aims of punishment? Which is the most important?
DavidFew
New Religious Movements and Cults

New Religious Movements and Cults

A differentiated activity with Marketplace, opinion line and video clip which explores these key questions: What are new religious movements and cults? What are the benefits and challenges of such movements? Should these new religious movements be made illegal? A Powerpoint and extensive word resource which has information on 8 of the world's new religious movements & cults.
DavidFew
Nelson Mandela, an overview

Nelson Mandela, an overview

A PPT with a variety of extensions to give students an idea about what all the fuss is about. The PPT itself is pretty self explanatory, and contains links to a variety of youtube videos (some are animations) as well as the Specials 'Free Nelson Mandela&' single. What a legend!
DavidFew
Key Jewish Beliefs and Practices

Key Jewish Beliefs and Practices

This is a marketplace activity which aims to give students some introductory knowledge about four key aspects of Jewish life. The four aspects included here are: Beliefs about G-d The Shema Shabbat The Ten Commandments What are some key Jewish beliefs and practices? What are their benefits for Jewish people? EXT: What are their challenges for Jewish people? Good lesson for Religious Studies, PHSE, Citizenship, SMSC and improving community understanding.
DavidFew
Loss and Blame in the Holocaust

Loss and Blame in the Holocaust

This lesson explores who is to blame for the Shoah/Holocaust. It endeavours to introduce nuance and deeper empathy into students’ understanding in that the Shoah cannot simply be Hitler’s fault: millions of people collaborated, agreed and perpetuated anti-semitism, including some Jews in the Ghettos who faced making impossible decisions in desperate circumstances. Activities are differentiated, with youtube videos of survivors testimonies (which are a little quiet), and the lesson is perfect for religious studies, PHSE, citizenship and SMSC. It’s perhaps a bit personal for a history lesson, but may be used to augment existing scheme’s of work to help engagement. Learning Questions include: Can I describe the different things that were lost in the Holocaust? (level 4-5) Can I explain my opinion on who was responsible for different things in the Holocaust? (5-6) Can I evaluate different opinions on who was to blame in specific situations? (level 6-7) There are also extension tasks which include footage of Otto Frank after his loss of his entire family. All feedback gratefully received.
DavidFew
Jewish Identity & 1000 yrs of anti-semitism

Jewish Identity & 1000 yrs of anti-semitism

This resource looks at Jewish identity, and is part of a scheme of work about the Shoah/Holocaust. It includes some basic beliefs about G-d (including why Jews often write G-d, instead of God) as well as a brief overview of 1000 years of anti-semitism. It puts the anti-semitism that flared into the Shoah into perspective and I’ve used it mainly with KS3 students. It includes a clip of some survivors testimonies which speak about their experience of antisemitism, and has differentiated tasks that explore quotes from the Torah and Talmud in more depth. Extension tasks also included. Easily adaptable for KS4. Ideal for religious studies, SMSC, citizenship and PHSE. Learning Questions (Objectives) include: Can I imagine the possible impacts of the Holocaust on a Jewish person? How may the Holocaust have influenced or challenged Jewish beliefs? What are some key Jewish Beliefs? EXTENSION: Can I evaluate how the Holocaust may effect Jewish people today?
DavidFew
Heroes of the Holocaust: Rescuers and Rebels

Heroes of the Holocaust: Rescuers and Rebels

This lesson is an exploration of the incredible human beings who risked (and sometimes lost) their lives working to rescue Jews from the Holocaust. It is an inspiration from Philip Zimbardo who encourages us to educate children about the psychology of heroism. This powerpoint and collected resources aims to help students understand and be inspired by the incredible acts of bravery these people engaged with. I greatly encourage you to play the video linked to this lesson to students: it moves me to tears every time! Learning Questions include: How did some people act heroically in the Holocaust? How did these heroes’ beliefs affect their actions? Can you evaluate the motivations for people’s actions? EXT: What is the psychology of Heroism? What can we do to help ourselves become more heroic? Great for PHSE, Citizenship, Religious Studies and History. Extension tasks and differentiated activities included.
DavidFew
Lesson 3: Global Citizenship (Money and Inequality)

Lesson 3: Global Citizenship (Money and Inequality)

This extensive resource can easily be stretched out to 2, or even 3 lessons. It is intended to educate, and to some extent agitate, young citizenship students to be aware of the global financial situation they are situated in and how some activists perceive it. It includes case studies (e.g. the Raza Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh), articles, extension activities, an exhibition of art by Manchester based artist Polyp (who gave his consent for use of his resources), video clips, kinaesthetic group exercises, think pair share. I’ve thrown it all in into this 53 slides. The length of the resource gives you scope to pick and choose, and hopefully should meet the exact requirements of the class you have. There are also extensions about the banking crisis, and possible solutions, for stretch and challenge tasks or KS5. Learning questions (objectives) include: What is money? Am I rich? What is Exploitation? Is the global money system give a fair deal to all who are part of it? Extension: Is financial inequality out of control, and if so how can it be fixed? This extensive resource aims to meet Citizenship, PHSE, UNESCO Sustainable Development goals (4.7) and is created for a religious studies compulsory group (which combines all of the above curricula in my school) to explore the ethics and develop debating skills. It can also be used in geography lessons effectively.
DavidFew
Introduction to Global Citizenship

Introduction to Global Citizenship

This lesson is an introduction to global citizenship, part of a module on Global citizenship, that begins with a personal look at the individual. It includes youtube videos, mindmaps, one print out and structured questions to help students understand their own biases and the biases of the class they are in. It is a powerful step forward for self reflective learners, uses PELTS well, and incorporates SMSC, Ethics, PHSE, Citizenship and geography into one topic. Tasks are differentiated, with questions going from easy to more difficult. Ideal for KS3-4 (11-16yr olds). Learning Questions include: What is global citizenship? What is my own personal, social, historical and economic background? How might my background affect how I see the world?
DavidFew
Lesson 2:  Uncomfortable Histories (Global Citizenship)

Lesson 2: Uncomfortable Histories (Global Citizenship)

This lesson aims to give students (particularly British ones) some understanding of the histories and activities of Britain we don’t mention as much as the 2nd World War, the Tudors and the Romans. It is an exploration of the slave trade, the arms trade, native american indians, aborigines and transportation and our involvement in India during the empire. It aims to give students an alternative perspective on Britain without undermining them as individuals, invalidating their experience or burdening them with guilt. Hopefully it leads to some interesting discussion and learning. It certainly does in my classroom! Group activities, based on SOLE (Self Organised Learning Environments), which need some monitoring but the resources created would work well with a variety of exercises including marketplace and others. It aims to meet the Global Citizenship Education aims, specifically 4.7 (which focuses on global citizenship education and education for sustainable development). Any feedback greatly received Learning Questions include: What are the histories we learn about in school? What was Britain’s role in the slave trade, Native American Indians, Aboriginal peoples, the arms trade and India? How do these histories affect our opinions about today’s world? Extension: can you figure out what/whose histories are not included in this lesson? How would you find out about them? Are we responsible for our ancestors’ actions?
DavidFew
Gandhi and the Caste System

Gandhi and the Caste System

This lesson is designed to be adaptable to the needs of your class. It can build on previous knowledge of Gandhi, and works best if that is the case, but can also be used as an introduction to Gandhi’s teaching and life. (To this end, I’ve included a link of him burning the passes and his famous non violence speech that followed it, which are both short and excellent insights into his teaching and philosophy. On non violence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKzKj_8CO2g Burning of the passes (ahimsa):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50gNryy9JnA) It includes extension tasks for able and talented, and differentiated activities including ethical dilemmas, youtube videos, group discussions, treasure hunts as well as written tasks. A broad range of activities, in my experience, always bosters engagement. (there is a need to print 10 slides here) The lesson aims to remind students’ of Gandhi’s teachings and inform them of the Caste system. There is also a short video about Narayanan Krishnan, an inspirational Hindu who has disregarded his Brahmin caste to help untouchables or down and outs in Indian Society. 2 differently worded Learning Objectives here for lower and higher ability or age groups: To remember who Gandhi was. to explain what the caste system was. To know Gandhi’s opinion of the untouchables. To develop and evaluate my own opinion about the caste system. To empathise with people who are in the caste system. Or, for KS4, All will be able to explain what the caste system was, and why Gandhi was against it. Most will be able to relate the situation to contemporary issues re: jobs and status. Some will be able to explain why the caste system became a source of prejudice and discrimination.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 3: Surrogacy Case Studies

Medical Ethics 3: Surrogacy Case Studies

This lesson explores surrogacy: what it is, the issues it raises, look at specific case studies and explore religious responses. It includes a moving article about an infertile woman, as well as 3 real life case studies of people who have gone through surrogacy. Plenary, starter and differentiated task included. Some printing is needed here to get the best out of the lesson, but not 100% necessary. Learning Objectives are: To know what surrogacy is and the issues it raises To debate the ethics of specific case studies To evaluate religious arguments about surrogacy
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 1: Embryo Research

Medical Ethics 1: Embryo Research

An introductory lesson to medical ethics focussing on embryology. This powerpoint explains what embryology is, as well as giving an introduction to one of the key questions behind most medical ethics issues: when does life begin? It includes high definition photographs of embryos in development and an embedded video which shows these stages. It also includes a case study, a research homework, plenty of information (including some religious opinions). These are developed more in the second lesson. Information can be printed out and Learning Questions include: What is Embryo Research? What are some potential problems and positives of Embryo Research? What are some religious opinions? What is my opinion? All feedback welcome! :)
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 8: Consolidation and Extension

Medical Ethics 8: Consolidation and Extension

This small bundle of resources is designed to help students revise together and independently so they really know what embryology, cloning, IVF, surrogacy, human experimentation and transplants and transfusions are, as well as the key terms essential for a good grade. Learning objectives are: Be more confident about the topics involved in Medical Ethics Have a more fluent understanding of the religious issues raised by these topics. Have begun to evaluate the various merits of different opinions about modern medical procedures.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 4: Transplants and Transfusions

Medical Ethics 4: Transplants and Transfusions

This comprehensive lesson exploring the facts, benefits and religious responses to organ transplants and blood transfusions will need trimming to fit in one hour. There are plenty of case studies, youtube clips, embedded short videos about ‘cellular memory’, and comparative religious arguments from the six major religions. Activities are differentiated by outcome, with discussion or learning pyramid plenaries available. Went all out on this one. Learning Objectives: To know the possible benefits about organ transplants. To know some religious attitudes to blood transfusions and organ transplants. To evaluate and compare religious attitudes to medical ethics. It also includes a particularly close look at Jehovah’s witnesses opinions on blood transfusions.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics: Religious Studies and Ethics

Medical Ethics: Religious Studies and Ethics

A bundle of 8 lessons which includes: embryology, IVF, surrogacy, cloning, transplants and transfusions and human experimentation. these include case studies, embedded videos, youtube links, articles, current updated statistics and a variety of activities for students to get stuck into. This also includes some extenstion activities, some key word tasks and a revision session to really embed your students learning. 50% reduction on indivual lessons.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 6: Cloning (with cover lesson)

Medical Ethics 6: Cloning (with cover lesson)

This lesson has a hotseat starter which covers many key terms from Medical ethics (i.e. sanctity of life) as well as an interactive treasure hunt plenary for those of you with the luxury of smart boards. Learning Questions include: What is Cloning? What are the different kinds of cloning? What are religious responses to it? Extension: What quotes do you know that could apply to this topic and how? There is also a roleplay opportunity included here, as well as a variety of youtube links and a cover lesson linked to the sixth day which can be rented or bought on youtube (It’s no gattaca, but has some interesting ethical issues raised and debated in there). Differentiated by outcome, with extension task included with the learning questions.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 5: Genetic Engineering

Medical Ethics 5: Genetic Engineering

A lesson which explores and explains genetic engineering, looking at some specific examples (such as glow in the dark mice) as well as a case study activity. It builds on previous lessons on religious attitudes to medical ethics particularly well, but also stands alone. Learning Objectives are: To know the difference between: Genetic Screening & Genetic Engineering To evaluate religious arguments about genetic screening and engineering To develop my own opinion on these technologies. Starters and plenaries included with activities differentiated by outcome.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 7: Human Experimentation

Medical Ethics 7: Human Experimentation

A lesson that explores the pros and cons of human experimentation: how it is essential for new safe drugs, as well as the darker sides of using humans for purely ‘scientific’ progress. Learning Questions: What are some examples of human experimentation? What ethical issues do they raise? What may religious responses be? Particular examples are included as a seperate word document, as well as youtube links to modern versions of Milgrams electric shock experiment in the 60s.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 2: Assisted Reproduction (IVF)

Medical Ethics 2: Assisted Reproduction (IVF)

A powerpoint that explores assisted reproduction, specifically IVF (AIH and AID). It includes religious responses to the issue, which can be used in a variety of ways (as a treasure hunt or group exercise). Learning questions include: What is IVF? (AIH and AID) What are some Religious Responses to it? Learn a case study and consider if IVF is ethical? Case studies include Octomom, with a youtube video link included, to explore IVF at its extremes and help students evaluate how different situations may alter their opinions on how ethical it is. The exercises are differentiated by outcome, and groupings can be done using a kagan system of mixed ability. Side note: My preference with the religious responses exercise is to number the class 1-5, have them study, condense and write one opinion. I then re-number them 1-4 and have them sit in new groups, so each new grouping has at least one person from each of the 5 previous groups. They then teach each other all the information.
DavidFew
Breaking up: ending relationships well

Breaking up: ending relationships well

A PHSE lesson to help students discuss and explore healthy ways to end relationships. It’s an attempt to try and get secondary school students in particular to treat each other with respect when everything seems epically painful. Differentiated by outcome, with plenty of opportunities for discussion and exploration with some youtube links included.
DavidFew
The six aims of punishment

The six aims of punishment

A lesson to explore the six aims of punishment: protection, retribution, vindication, deterrence, reformation and reparation. It includes discussions on what crimes should receive what punishment, learning walks and written exercises which increase in difficulty. Writing scaffolding for paragraphs are included on the powerpoint, and it will help students studying religious studies, history and citizenship. Learning questions: What are the six aims of punishment? Which is the most important?
DavidFew
Capital Punishment

Capital Punishment

An introductory lesson, including a debate ("Capital Punishment should be reintroduced to the UK"), about Capital Punishment. It covers the following objectives, mainly from a secular viewpoint although including some Christian views: What is Capital Punishment? What are the arguments for and against it? What do YOU think? It includes a youtube video, gap fill exercise, debate and evaluation writing exercise. Students are always engaged with this topic area.
DavidFew