Fake News

Fake News

A powerpoint which includes differentiation activities, a worksheet (with different activities for KS3 or 4 which we print on double sided A3, and there is enough here for at least 2 lessons. Youtube links, treasure hunts, a debate, TPS activity and more. Easily personalisable to suit your own needs, and included here is the SMSC objectives met with this lesson. The Powerpoint itself has some instructions on how to use the resource, although most of it is quite self explanatory. Enjoy!
DavidFew
The six aims of punishment

The six aims of punishment

A lesson to explore the six aims of punishment: protection, retribution, vindication, deterrence, reformation and reparation. It includes discussions on what crimes should receive what punishment, learning walks and written exercises which increase in difficulty. Writing scaffolding for paragraphs are included on the powerpoint, and it will help students studying religious studies, history and citizenship. Learning questions: What are the six aims of punishment? Which is the most important?
DavidFew
New Religious Movements and Cults

New Religious Movements and Cults

A differentiated activity with Marketplace, opinion line and video clip which explores these key questions: What are new religious movements and cults? What are the benefits and challenges of such movements? Should these new religious movements be made illegal? A Powerpoint and extensive word resource which has information on 8 of the world's new religious movements & cults.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 2: Assisted Reproduction (IVF)

Medical Ethics 2: Assisted Reproduction (IVF)

A powerpoint that explores assisted reproduction, specifically IVF (AIH and AID). It includes religious responses to the issue, which can be used in a variety of ways (as a treasure hunt or group exercise). Learning questions include: What is IVF? (AIH and AID) What are some Religious Responses to it? Learn a case study and consider if IVF is ethical? Case studies include Octomom, with a youtube video link included, to explore IVF at its extremes and help students evaluate how different situations may alter their opinions on how ethical it is. The exercises are differentiated by outcome, and groupings can be done using a kagan system of mixed ability. Side note: My preference with the religious responses exercise is to number the class 1-5, have them study, condense and write one opinion. I then re-number them 1-4 and have them sit in new groups, so each new grouping has at least one person from each of the 5 previous groups. They then teach each other all the information.
DavidFew
Breaking up: ending relationships well

Breaking up: ending relationships well

A PHSE lesson to help students discuss and explore healthy ways to end relationships. It’s an attempt to try and get secondary school students in particular to treat each other with respect when everything seems epically painful. Differentiated by outcome, with plenty of opportunities for discussion and exploration with some youtube links included.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 3: Surrogacy Case Studies

Medical Ethics 3: Surrogacy Case Studies

This lesson explores surrogacy: what it is, the issues it raises, look at specific case studies and explore religious responses. It includes a moving article about an infertile woman, as well as 3 real life case studies of people who have gone through surrogacy. Plenary, starter and differentiated task included. Some printing is needed here to get the best out of the lesson, but not 100% necessary. Learning Objectives are: To know what surrogacy is and the issues it raises To debate the ethics of specific case studies To evaluate religious arguments about surrogacy
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 1: Embryo Research

Medical Ethics 1: Embryo Research

An introductory lesson to medical ethics focussing on embryology. This powerpoint explains what embryology is, as well as giving an introduction to one of the key questions behind most medical ethics issues: when does life begin? It includes high definition photographs of embryos in development and an embedded video which shows these stages. It also includes a case study, a research homework, plenty of information (including some religious opinions). These are developed more in the second lesson. Information can be printed out and Learning Questions include: What is Embryo Research? What are some potential problems and positives of Embryo Research? What are some religious opinions? What is my opinion? All feedback welcome! :)
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 8: Consolidation and Extension

Medical Ethics 8: Consolidation and Extension

This small bundle of resources is designed to help students revise together and independently so they really know what embryology, cloning, IVF, surrogacy, human experimentation and transplants and transfusions are, as well as the key terms essential for a good grade. Learning objectives are: Be more confident about the topics involved in Medical Ethics Have a more fluent understanding of the religious issues raised by these topics. Have begun to evaluate the various merits of different opinions about modern medical procedures.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 4: Transplants and Transfusions

Medical Ethics 4: Transplants and Transfusions

This comprehensive lesson exploring the facts, benefits and religious responses to organ transplants and blood transfusions will need trimming to fit in one hour. There are plenty of case studies, youtube clips, embedded short videos about ‘cellular memory’, and comparative religious arguments from the six major religions. Activities are differentiated by outcome, with discussion or learning pyramid plenaries available. Went all out on this one. Learning Objectives: To know the possible benefits about organ transplants. To know some religious attitudes to blood transfusions and organ transplants. To evaluate and compare religious attitudes to medical ethics. It also includes a particularly close look at Jehovah’s witnesses opinions on blood transfusions.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics: Religious Studies and Ethics

Medical Ethics: Religious Studies and Ethics

A bundle of 8 lessons which includes: embryology, IVF, surrogacy, cloning, transplants and transfusions and human experimentation. these include case studies, embedded videos, youtube links, articles, current updated statistics and a variety of activities for students to get stuck into. This also includes some extenstion activities, some key word tasks and a revision session to really embed your students learning. 50% reduction on indivual lessons.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 6: Cloning (with cover lesson)

Medical Ethics 6: Cloning (with cover lesson)

This lesson has a hotseat starter which covers many key terms from Medical ethics (i.e. sanctity of life) as well as an interactive treasure hunt plenary for those of you with the luxury of smart boards. Learning Questions include: What is Cloning? What are the different kinds of cloning? What are religious responses to it? Extension: What quotes do you know that could apply to this topic and how? There is also a roleplay opportunity included here, as well as a variety of youtube links and a cover lesson linked to the sixth day which can be rented or bought on youtube (It’s no gattaca, but has some interesting ethical issues raised and debated in there). Differentiated by outcome, with extension task included with the learning questions.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 5: Genetic Engineering

Medical Ethics 5: Genetic Engineering

A lesson which explores and explains genetic engineering, looking at some specific examples (such as glow in the dark mice) as well as a case study activity. It builds on previous lessons on religious attitudes to medical ethics particularly well, but also stands alone. Learning Objectives are: To know the difference between: Genetic Screening & Genetic Engineering To evaluate religious arguments about genetic screening and engineering To develop my own opinion on these technologies. Starters and plenaries included with activities differentiated by outcome.
DavidFew
Medical Ethics 7: Human Experimentation

Medical Ethics 7: Human Experimentation

A lesson that explores the pros and cons of human experimentation: how it is essential for new safe drugs, as well as the darker sides of using humans for purely ‘scientific’ progress. Learning Questions: What are some examples of human experimentation? What ethical issues do they raise? What may religious responses be? Particular examples are included as a seperate word document, as well as youtube links to modern versions of Milgrams electric shock experiment in the 60s.
DavidFew
Nelson Mandela, an overview

Nelson Mandela, an overview

A PPT with a variety of extensions to give students an idea about what all the fuss is about. The PPT itself is pretty self explanatory, and contains links to a variety of youtube videos (some are animations) as well as the Specials 'Free Nelson Mandela&' single. What a legend!
DavidFew
The six aims of punishment

The six aims of punishment

A lesson to explore the six aims of punishment: protection, retribution, vindication, deterrence, reformation and reparation. It includes discussions on what crimes should receive what punishment, learning walks and written exercises which increase in difficulty. Writing scaffolding for paragraphs are included on the powerpoint, and it will help students studying religious studies, history and citizenship. Learning questions: What are the six aims of punishment? Which is the most important?
DavidFew
Capital Punishment

Capital Punishment

An introductory lesson, including a debate ("Capital Punishment should be reintroduced to the UK"), about Capital Punishment. It covers the following objectives, mainly from a secular viewpoint although including some Christian views: What is Capital Punishment? What are the arguments for and against it? What do YOU think? It includes a youtube video, gap fill exercise, debate and evaluation writing exercise. Students are always engaged with this topic area.
DavidFew
Jihad: Muslim Attitudes to War

Jihad: Muslim Attitudes to War

A lesson that explores Muslim attitudes to war through Jihad. It explores the greater and lesser jihad, and gets students to collaboratively piece together what Jihad actually is whilst debunking the myth that it means ‘holy war’. Closer to ‘righteous struggle’ this lesson aims to draw comparison with the Just War Theory and help to see how in some ways it is more progressive than the JWT (avoids hurting plants and animals) and in others more religious (must be ordered by a religious leader). It also compares modern conflicts to Jihad, and the ways it has been misused. Learning Questions include: What are Muslim views to war? What is Jihad? How might Jihad be misinterpreted? Extension tasks included, as is a wordsearch starter for students to have a quick win at the beginning of the lesson to build learning engagement.
DavidFew
9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace

9.11, Terrorism, War and Peace

This lesson has been a long one in the making. Having found resources from all over the web, edited my own video compiling footage from 9.11 and interviews from Geroge Bush and Osama Bin Laden, this lesson aims to give as an impartial view of 9.11 as possible. It includes neo-conservative explanations for 9.11, to Noam CHomsky esque critique of American Foreign Policy that Michael Moore would be proud of, and even allows al-Qaeda to explain their opinion. Obviously it makes explicit that targetting civilians is never, under any circumstances, acceptable, but tries to explain that 9.11 was a complicated event with historical, cultural, social and religious causes using a redacted and edited document which summarises complicated historical commentary into a digestible PDF. It even includes a brief mention of conspiracy theories for those more inquisitive students. Above all, it encourages critical thought and human compassion. A wide range of differentiated and extension activities here. Learning Questions: What was 9/11? How did it cause a war? Why did the the USA and al-Qaeda say it happened? Ext: Why do you think it happened? Independent, group and whole class activities included to bolster engagement and learning. There’s enough for at least 2 lessons here. But I’m selling it as one, because I’m nice like that.
DavidFew
Christian opinions to War

Christian opinions to War

A lesson which explores Christian Attitudes to War. Learning Questions include: What are Christian Opinions to War? Why do Christians disagree with each other? EXT: How do you think social background affects peoples opinions? This powerpoint looks includes extension activities, independent learning activities and joint discussion. It covers citizenship, PHSE, SEAL, SMSC and Religious Studies syllabi (I love that plural) and I have found it to be a fairly engaging lesson for many students. It also includes a link to a youtube video animation to the parable of the lost son, and links this to the topic of war and peace for students to consider how religious teachings may be applied to modern day dilemmas. Not dilemmi. Sadly.
DavidFew
Nuclear War

Nuclear War

This lesson explores Nuclear war: the affects of nuclear weapons, if they can ever be justified, if there are any specific examples students know of, and how Christians might respond to the idea of nuclear war using the just war theory. SEND worksheet included, and a variety of extension activities (including how to make a peace crane) are included. As well as this, youtube videos and plenty of discussion activities, as well as an online ‘nuke map’ which explains how a nuke would affect the area you are, anywhere in the world. I know, right? An amazing resource. Learning Questions: What do Nuclear weapons do? Can Nuclear War ever be just? Are there any examples you know? How may Christians respond to Nuclear war?
DavidFew
Money, Debt and inequality

Money, Debt and inequality

When I ask my students: ‘What is money?’, they hardly ever know. Most adults don’t either. This lesson looks at what money is, how the banking crisis happened, what the difference between good debt and bad debt is, and the current global inequality in wealth. It includes individual and group work activities, as well as whole class discussions, to try and stimulate students understanding and critical engagement with the world as it is. A lesson that could work as an introduction for economics, PHSE, SEAL, SMSC and Careers lessons for children aged 11+. Extensions, start and plenary are included to aid differentiation and the learning journey. Learning questions also increase in difficulty as the lesson progresses. Learning questions include: What is money? What’s the difference between good debt and bad debt? What is crypto-currency? Extension: Is financial inequality out of control, and if so how can it be resolved? Instructions on how to use the resource are in the notes of the powerpoint, which also includes a number of youtube videos, and included here is also a short word document which has some of the debate about where money originated from and what preceded it. This document is made from a summary of Graeber’s recent work and watching the ‘crash course’ video on money. Adam Smith’s idea that barter preceded minted coinage seems, in recent academia, to be incorrect. Rather, minted metal coinage seems to have been part of a ‘military-mining-slavery complex’ where wars created slaves to mine metal to pay soldiers.
DavidFew
The Investigatory Powers Act

The Investigatory Powers Act

Perfect for a form discussion or a PHSE/Citizenship lesson, this resource examines the investigatory powers act and gives students the opportunity to debate their opinions on mass surveillance. It also summarises human rights, and is designed to help develop students skills of critical thought and debate. It includes a short youtube video and SMSC objectives. Learning Questions include: What is the investigatory powers act? Should the government be able to see all of our online data? SMSC objectives met are: To learn and discuss what is right and wrong and respect the law; investigate moral and ethical issues and offer reasoned views. To appreciate diverse viewpoints and resolve conflict.
DavidFew
Causes of War

Causes of War

A lesson that explores the learning questions: What causes war? Is war ever justified? Using a game students explore in teams of 6 the possible causes of war, and evaluate if they are worthwhile. Differentiated learning outcomes and links to youtube videos included, this lesson has been tweaked over a course of 5 years into something that works for me in the classroom. It includes guided discussion and debate topics, as well as some religious opinions in the form of Augustine’s just war theory. Any necessary instructions included in the powerpoint notes.
DavidFew
The Just War Theory

The Just War Theory

A lesson designed to explore the Just War Theory in a collaborative, group work activity that emphasizes team work. This leads on to a creative activity where students create a poster, poem or rap to exemplify the Just War Theory’s 7 aspects. Learning Questions include: What is the Just War Theory? Do I agree with it? Why? Differentiated learning outcomes included, which evaluate why Christians may or may not agree with the Just War Theory. All activities are clearly explained in the Powerpoint, and a variety of extension activities for more able students are included.
DavidFew