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Mao to Now - China History Bundle - Full Scheme of Work SoW
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Mao to Now - China History Bundle - Full Scheme of Work SoW

3 Resources
This set of lessons could form a mini Scheme of Work on modern China or slot in as a part of a Cold War SoW. Lesson 1: How did Chairman Mao change China? This lesson looks at the Centruy of Humiliation then goes on to look at how Mao set about to deal with the problems China was facing after 1949. Lesson 2: Mao’s China: The Cultural Revolution This lesson looks at the Great Leap Forward and the Great Famine which gives contextual information for the students to understand what was the Cultural Revolution, and what was the impact. Lesson 3: Deng Xiaoping, Tiananmen Square, Opening Up and Reform This lesson looks at how Deng ended the Cultural Revolution and implemented a more pragmatic economic policy. The lesson then goes on to look at how this was misinterpreted and led to the pro-democracy movement - and the subsequent Tiananmen Square Massacre. The lesson goes up to the current day giving students a rich understanding of China’s place in the world. All of the lessons can be split in half, meaning there could be 6 lessons worth of content. All of the lessons are fully resourced, including PPTs, embedded videos and worksheets/print-offs.
American War of Independence - US History, British Empire, KS3 Resource or GCSE Primer Intro Lesson
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American War of Independence - US History, British Empire, KS3 Resource or GCSE Primer Intro Lesson

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The aim of the lesson is for the students to understand how America achieved independence. It looks at life in colonial British America , the events leading up to the war and the war itself . It is useful as a stand-alone lesson on America , as part of a scheme of work on America, slavery or the British Empire . It is also useful as introduction lesson to test prior knowledge and set up future classes for the Edexcel GCSE British America, 1713 - 1783: empire and revolution module . Lesson begins with a low-stakes knowledge check on US presidents. Literacy is focused on with definitions of key words given followed by a comprehension reading task on life in British America before the revolution. Students then are given a card sort on the events leading up to the war, and the events of the war. The PowerPoint then goes through the order of the cards with paintings and other visual representations for the events that each card shows. Each slide has detailed notes on each event given to add context to class discussion and stretch and challenge all learners. Students will then consolidate this new learning by writing the narrative of how America achieved independence. This is a British America GCSE module style question . The students will be introduced to the Betsy Ross flag with a task around it. The lesson concludes with a quiz to reinforce learning. This is a fully resourced lesson including a PowerPoint, with detailed explanatory notes, reading activity, worksheet, card sort (mixed and correct order), as well as two American flag colouring resources
Jamestown: Britain's First Colony - British America
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Jamestown: Britain's First Colony - British America

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Lesson objective: For students to understand that Britain formed the first colony in what would become the USA, understand what life was like in the colony and reasons for colonisation. It is useful as a stand-alone lesson on early America, or as part of a greater scheme of work on America, slavery, civil rights or the British Empire. The lesson was designed to act as a KS3 primer for the Edexcel GCSE Early Elizabethan England and British America, 1713 - 1783 modules. The lesson gives an overview of the 13 colonies, includes problems solving and mystery around the Roanoke colony, deep thinking on Jamestown and includes a creative activity where students create their own American colony. This is a fully resourced lesson including a PowerPoint and embedded videos.
Understanding Cause and Consequence
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Understanding Cause and Consequence

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This lesson works perfectly to introduce chronology with Year 7 and sets the students up for the rest of their History adventure be it 3, 5 or 7! It works as a stand-alone lesson, or as the second in my introduction to history series with ‘what is chronology’ being the first part. This is a full lesson and comes with my students’ seal of approval. Introduction: Students begin with a literacy exercise Teacher-Student investigation: Students are asked for their ideas on what ‘cause’ and ‘consequence’ means. Then put this skill to the test with a literacy exercise. Practice: Students are given four consequences and can come up with imaginative causes! Main task: Students are given a series of events (from across the KS3 and 4 curriculum), they then work together to work out the cause for each of them. Explanation: The events are then given to the students to self-check their timeline with the events being given one-by-one on the PPT. Time for teacher insight into each event and to ask class for their ideas. Plenary practice: Students then write some of their own cause and consequence sentences and share them with their partner. I always enjoy delivering this lesson, and I hope you will, too!
Mao's China: The Cultural Revolution - Full Lesson
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Mao's China: The Cultural Revolution - Full Lesson

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The aim of the lesson is for the students to understand what the Cultural Revolution was and its impact. It is useful as a stand-alone lesson on China, as part of a greater Cold War scheme of work, or in conjunction with my other China lessons (where this forms the second part). There is a lot of content in this lesson, and can be taught as two lessons allowing the teacher to go into greater depth and detail with the students. Lesson begins with a retrieval practice question on Stalin and Mao. Students then analyse a source and make a hypothesis about the Great Leap Forward. Students will then complete a video comprehension task on the effects of the Great Leap Forward, including the Great Famine. Students will analyse the personal impact of Chairman Mao and make judgements on his impact in China at the time. The main task is for students to analyse the Cultural Revolution. This can be done as a teacher-led task, or printed off with the students completing the investigation task individually or in groups. Students will analyse the following aspects of the Cultural Revolution and make judgements on their impact: The Red Guard, attacks on education, public shaming, destruction of history, aggression towards the USSR. Chinese writing. Students will be introduced to the simplification of written Chinese. Students will have time to look at and practice writing various words in the traditional script, then in the simplified script. The lesson will conclude with students making a Cultural Revolution era poster. Example posters and slogans (in English and Chinese) are provided. Some key words and phrases from the lesson: Stalin Great Leap Forward Great Famine Cultural Revolution Red Guard Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese This is a fully resourced lesson including a PowerPoint as well as documents for printing.
Life in British America - British Empire, Colonialism, American History, Year 7, 8, 9
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Life in British America - British Empire, Colonialism, American History, Year 7, 8, 9

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In this lesson the students will find out about: Who colonised British America (nationality, religion) What challenges did they face (climate, religious strife, work) Where did their loyalties lie (leading to, how and why did the colonies rebel - please see my other lesson on the American Revolution) The investigation includes a writing task where students put themselves in the shoes of various types of new arrival (Middle Colony ship builder, New England Puritan, Southern slave) to empathaise with how each would feel.
Deng Xiaoping, Tiananmen Square and Opening up and Reform - Full Lesson
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Deng Xiaoping, Tiananmen Square and Opening up and Reform - Full Lesson

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This lesson focuses on China under Deng Xiaoping. Focusing on the economic changes Kaifang Gaige (Opening up and Reform), the Tiananmen Square Massacre (6/4) and finishes with a look at modern China. It is useful as a stand-alone lesson on China, as part of a greater Cold War scheme of work, or in conjunction with my other China lessons (where this forms the third part). This lesson can be taught in one or spread over two. Lesson begins with the students making predictions about how and why Shenzhen grew so much. Students then recap/get background information on the Cultural Revolution. Students will then investigate a quote by Deng Xiaoping and make a hypothesis on how he will run China. The policies of Opening Up and Reform are then discussed, with links to the USSR, and then the effects are analysed, numeracy task. Students then learn about the democracy movement, including the Tiananmen Square Massacre and its aftermath. Finally students look at modern China and understand the economic and soft-power China possesses today. Some key words and phrases from the lesson: Cultural Revolution, Chairman Mao, Deng Xiaoping, economic, development, Opening Up, Reform, Kaifang, Gaige, Glasnost, Perestroika, Tiananmen Square Massacre, democracy, GDP, Huawei, Tiktok This is a fully resourced lesson including a PowerPoint as well as documents for printing, including an extension exercise if needed.
Should old statues be kept? Civil Rights, BLM, Black History Month, Empire, Edward Colston, KS3
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Should old statues be kept? Civil Rights, BLM, Black History Month, Empire, Edward Colston, KS3

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The aim of the lesson is for the students to actively investigate the passive world around them. They will look at the current climate around equality and make a reasoned judgment on whether a statue should be removed or not. It is useful as a stand-alone lesson on current affairs , as part of a scheme of work on Civil Rights, slavery or the British Empire . Lesson Outline The lesson begins with the image of Edward Colston’s statue being thrown into the water with questions to start the students thinking about the event. The lesson moves on to why are statues built in the first place, to help them actively engage with the concept, rather than passively accept they are just ‘something that is there’. Students are then asked to think about some of the world’s most famous statues and asked for their opinions on them. The lesson moves on to a discussion on the Edward Colston statue. With students shown a picture and video of the event and asked to reflect on what happened and hypothesise on the cause. Next is an investigation into Edward Colston himself, students are given one side of the argument and come up with an opinion on his statue, then given the other, with reasoned debate sparked in the class. Students are then given a quote from the Bible to reflect on and think about how it applies to the lesson. An investigation will then take place into four famous figures that have statues in London: Margaret Thatcher, Nelson Mandela, Mahatama Gandhi, and Winston Churchill. Students are given information on each of the four to read. They will decide whether or not their statue should be removed. This part of the lesson can be done with the students working individually or in pairs with the print-out included in this lesson, or as a class, one-by-one with the PowerPoint. After coming up with an answer for each, the teacher can ask the class their opinions on each of the statues. Why or why not the statue should be removed. This is a fully resourced lesson including a PowerPoint and Word handouts.
Introduction to GCSE History - Edexcel
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Introduction to GCSE History - Edexcel

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This fully-editable PPT introduces the Edexcel GCSE History curriculum, outlining each of the three papers. Sets presentation and behaviour standards, as well as a guide to studying. If you like this lesson, please check out my others! Enjoy :)
The Opium War - British Empire, Chinese History
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The Opium War - British Empire, Chinese History

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The aim of the lesson is for students to understand the Opium war, including the causes, course of the war, and the aftermath. It is useful as a stand-alone lesson on the Opium War, as part of a scheme of work on the British Empire, or on China** (which I have available :))** . The lesson begins with the students investigating a primary source - why is it there? What’s different about it? The lesson then recaps British activities elsewhere, i.e. plantations in North America Students investigate the multiple causes of the war A video shows the course of the war Students then investigate the aftermath of the war, with the British development of Hong Kong, ending with the recent pro-British/democracy protests (which raised many interesting questions amongst my students) The lesson ends with a GCSE 4 mark question, which I used as an assessment point. My students found this lesson really fascinating, I hope yours will, too!
POSTER Medicine Through Time EDEXCEL GCSE - Display
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POSTER Medicine Through Time EDEXCEL GCSE - Display

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2x A3 bold and eye-catching posters for both parts of the thematic study Paper 1! Catch your students’ attention Advertise to KS3 Inform your Y10 & 11s of what’s comming Posters include information on what percentage of the course the paper is worth, what the key skills are, what questions they will face and how to answer them! I’ve received lots of compliments since the posters went up from colleagues and my Year 11s have found them invaluable! Enjoy!
Stresemann's Foreign Policy - Full Lesson
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Stresemann's Foreign Policy - Full Lesson

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This is a full lesson with resources, including videos embedded. It works with any exam board investigating Stresemann’s foreign policies and made with Edexcel GCSE (9-1) Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-39 in mind. This lesson looks at: ‘How did Stresemann improve Germany’s international position?’ Lesson outline: Begins with retrieval practice questions on issues from 1918-1920s. Students then are given key words to study. Comprehension task recapping economic recovery, rentenmark, reichsmark, Dawes Plan, Young Plan. Students practice GCSE skill analysing a primary source answering a mock question. Investigation task into the main elements of Stresemann’s foreign policy: Locarno Pact, League of Nations and the Kellogg-Briand Pact. Analysis of the effect on domestic politics Writing task to consolidate knowledge on Stresemann. Key points recapped; teacher-led Plenary quiz
What is Chronology?
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What is Chronology?

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This lesson works perfectly to introduce chronology with Year 7 and sets the students up for the rest of their History adventure be it 3, 5 or 7! This is a full lesson and comes with my students’ seal of approval. Introduction: Start with a game, get the students straight into thinking and talking about history Literacy: Directly teach the key words, with a visual example Historiography: Introduce the students to timelines, with them guessing what happened at the two yers Main task: Students are given a series of events (from across the KS3 and 4 curriculum), they then work together to put them in chronological order. Explanation: Full screen pictures for each event, with year and the name of the event for students to self-check their timeline. Time for teacher insight into each event and to ask class for their ideas. Historiography: Students then draw their own timeline - can add the pictures with each event. (Grid with pictures of events is included in the PowerPoint) Wonder: Students then write about which of these events they most want to learn about and why. Useful exercise for finding out what your students want to learn! I always enjoy delivering this lesson, and I hope you will, too!
How did Chairman Mao Change China? - Full Lesson
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How did Chairman Mao Change China? - Full Lesson

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The aim of the lesson is for the students to judge how much Chairman Mao Zedong changed China. It is useful as a stand-alone lesson on China, as part of a greater Cold War scheme of work, or in conjunction with my other China lessons (where this forms the first part). Lesson begins with a source analysis of the carving up of China. Then students’ knowledge of China is discussed with a Round Robin activity. Students will then learn about the background of Communism in China, with the Century of Humiliation (including colonisation, the Opium Wars and China in WWII) being analysed. The main task is looking at the problems the ‘New China’ faced and how Chairman Mao and the Chinese Communist Party set about fixing them. This looks at economic growth in the First and Second Five Year Plans, analyses GDP growth and military threats to China, including the Korean War and US involvement in Vietnam. The lesson concludes with an extended writing activity with the students writing about the changes they have seen under the leadership of the CCP in a letter; allowing students to make their own assumptions and judgements on the class content. Some key words and phrases from the lesson: Century of Humiliation Opium War Ideology Economy Five Year Plan GDP Korean War Vietnam War This is a fully resourced lesson including a PowerPoint as well as documents for printing.
Edexcel GCSE History: 1.1 The situation on Elizabeth's accession. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1
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Edexcel GCSE History: 1.1 The situation on Elizabeth's accession. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1

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GCSE EDEXCEL History: Option B4: Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88 Unit 1: Queen, government and religion, 1558–69 This lesson covers the first subsection of Unit 1 (Queen, Government and Religion, 1558-69) Details of lesson: This lesson can be taught over one or two sessions. The lesson covers the content of this part of Paper 2. Retrieval Practice is embedded in the start with students thinking hard on prior knowledge independently, this is then reinforced with a set of RP questions to trigger deeper learning. Key words are taught explicitly to embed learning. Students will then engage in an independent sorting activity on Elizabethan society, followed by a word fill of a model paragraph. Students will research court and religion with questions and guidance to ensure that their focus on the text is maintained and pointed in the correct direction. Knowledge is consolidated with the ‘in a nutshell’ section, where the teacher can address any misconceptions and reiterate key points. The lesson finishes with a low-stakes quiz. I hope you enjoy this lesson and will use my other lessons in future!
Edexcel GCSE History: 1.2 The Settlement of Religion. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1
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Edexcel GCSE History: 1.2 The Settlement of Religion. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1

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GCSE EDEXCEL History: Option B4: Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88 Unit 1: Queen, government and religion, 1558–69 This lesson covers the second subsection of Unit 1 (Queen, Government and Religion, 1558-69) Details of lesson: This lesson has been designed to be taught over two lessons. The lesson begins with a Retrieval Practice quick to immediately engage students in learning once they enter the classroom. The first section of the lesson recaps learning from the previous lesson, giving time for the teacher to identify gaps in student knowledge and entrench key ideas. Students are given an overview of the key differences between Catholicism and Protestantism. The information is then taken away and the students have to complete the word-fill exercise from memory. The religious situation in England is investigated with the students carefully plotting a map of England. Key words for this unit are taught with the students working together to pair the word with the definition. The three sections of the Religious Settlement are to be printed off and cut up they should be hidden around the room. Students will then go on a treasure hunt to find the missing pieces, put them together and write a report on the Settlement. This knowledge is then practices with a GCSE question. Reaction to the Settlement is investigated, ties to future lessons can be made here. Knowledge is consolidated with the ‘in a nutshell’ section, where the teacher can address any misconceptions and reiterate key points.
Edexcel GCSE History: 1.3 Challenge to the Religious Settlement. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1
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Edexcel GCSE History: 1.3 Challenge to the Religious Settlement. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1

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GCSE EDEXCEL History: Option B4: Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88 Unit 1: Queen, government and religion, 1558–69 This lesson covers the third subsection of Unit 1 (Queen, Government and Religion, 1558-69) Details of lesson: This lesson splits the topic into two sections: foreign threats and domestic threats with a separate lesson on each - both lessons are included in this PPT. The first lesson begins with a RP literacy exercise. Key words are then explicitly taught to embed key learning. Students then investigate the counter-Reformation and its effects in France, the Netherlands and for relations with France. This knowledge is then put into practice with an extended writing task. The second lesson begins with an RP quiz followed by key words. The crucifix and vestment controversies are then taught with the students making informed hypotheses and practicing essay writing skills. The lesson continues to give a detailed introduction to the Revolt of the Northern Earls, links are made to future lessons. Knowledge is consolidated with the ‘in a nutshell’ section, where the teacher can address any misconceptions and reiterate key points. The lesson finishes with a low-stakes quick.
Edexcel GCSE History: 1.4 The Problem of Mary, Queen of Scots. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1
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Edexcel GCSE History: 1.4 The Problem of Mary, Queen of Scots. Early Elizabethan England Unit 1

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GCSE EDEXCEL History: Option B4: Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88 Unit 1: Queen, government and religion, 1558–69 This lesson covers the fourth and final subsection of Unit 1 (Queen, Government and Religion, 1558-69) Details of lesson: The first lesson begins with a RP literacy exercise. Key words are then explicitly taught to embed key learning. Students recap Elizabeth’s problems. Students investigate who Mary QoS was, and why she was a problem, with students forming links with, and building on, prior knowledge. Knowledge is consolidated with the ‘in a nutshell’ section, where the teacher can address any misconceptions and reiterate key points. The lesson finishes with a low-stakes quick.