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Melissa Victoria is a former English teacher with over 15 years' experience in a variety of secondary school settings, including comprehensive and grammar schools. She provides English resources mainly for high-ability students studying for GCSE and A level (AQA). Melissa Victoria has an MA in English from the University of Birmingham, UK.

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Melissa Victoria is a former English teacher with over 15 years' experience in a variety of secondary school settings, including comprehensive and grammar schools. She provides English resources mainly for high-ability students studying for GCSE and A level (AQA). Melissa Victoria has an MA in English from the University of Birmingham, UK.
Much Ado about Nothing
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Much Ado about Nothing

7 Resources
A Bundle of popular high-level Much Ado about Nothing GCSE resources. In this bundle, you will find: *An introduction to Dramatic Comedy PowerPoint *A Much Ado about Nothing high-level booklet *Much Ado about Nothing character revision posters *Three Much Ado about Nothing high-level essays with notes on how they fulfil AQA’s ‘extract to whole’ criteria *A high-ability Much Ado about Nothing Knowledge Organiser covering conceptual characterisation, context, themes and dramatic method Best wishes, Englbee x
Simon Armitage Poet Laureate
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Simon Armitage Poet Laureate

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A fully-adaptable 15-slide PowerPoint on The Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom and Simon Armitage’s appointment. The PowerPoint contains: A history of the role of Poet Laureate The role itself Payment How the role has changed over time Famous past Poets Laureate Differing opinions of the role A biography of Simon Armitage Simon Armitage’s reactions to becoming PL and his ambitions for the role. Many slides contain thought-bubbles which could be used with a class if needed to further discussion. The PowerPoint could be used: As an introduction to Armitage’s Poetry at GCSE For KS3 classes in the summer term as an introduction to poetry In PSHE exploring the role of poetry in wider society In an assembly exploring poetry/society Where copyright infringement is not an issue, I have included pictures of poets. Where copyright would be violated, I have given links to pictures and news stories. You can of course adapt the PowerPoint for yourself and include the images on slides. Best wishes, Englbee x
An Inspector Calls Significance of the Ending
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An Inspector Calls Significance of the Ending

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint on the significance of the ending An Inspector Calls for mid-to-higher level groups. Prior to the lesson, students will need to have read to the end of the play Includes: LOs and skills Gerald’s debunking of the Inspector and is signifiance The differences in attitude between the older and younger generation after the first inspector leaves The significance of Eva Smith as a symbolic character The significance of the ringing of a second bell, the second Inspector and Birling’s continued lack of character development Under most slides there are indicative answers in the notes section for teachers to help them. Students will likely come up with other valid answers so these are only a guide. Best wishes, Englbee x
Much Ado About Nothing
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Much Ado About Nothing

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Nine GCSE revision posters for Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado about Nothing’. These posters would be useful to display in classrooms, but may find an even better purpose as revision tools. Pupils can struggle to distil and make notes on Shakespeare; these posters offer key themes and ideas on each character with up to three relevent quotations (and references) for each. Something to give to less-able pupils to take away and revise from. For more able, a starting point towards further revision. Could be displayed as A3 or made into an A4 booklet. Your free Benedick poster can be found here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/much-ado-about-nothing-benedick-poster-free- Best wishes, Englbee x
Much Ado about Nothing
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Much Ado about Nothing

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A 30-page guide for high-ability students aiming for the new GCSE English Literature grades of 7, 8 and 9. Offered in Publisher as a fully-adaptable resource, and as a PDF. The guide can be used as revision, or as a starting point for a teacher developing a scheme of work. It will help those new to teaching and/or the play in teaching ‘Much Ado about Nothing’ at a high level, especially with regards to conceptualisation and characters as constructs (needed for top band). The guide offers detailed discussion on four major themes: marriage, love, deception and transformation. It also outlines significant moments of major characterisation (Benedick, Beatrice, Hero, Claudio, Leonato, Don John and Don Pedro) in a conceptualised way, considering the significance of character development across the play as a whole, and links with significant themes. There is also room for students to write in key quotations alongside each change in characterisation. There are further detailed reflections on the significance of Dogberry and the Watch, Margaret and ‘Green World’ . Finally there are several extracts from across the play with examination-style questions. Whilst the latter questions are geared towards the new AQA English Literature, the booklet is useful for any high-level study of Much Ado about Nothing. All notes are written by me, and my studying of the play with a high-level GCSE class. Best wishes, Englbee x
Walking Away
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Walking Away

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint which explores ‘Walking Away’ in preparation for the AQA Literature Examination The PowerPoint and accompanying teacher notes are aimed at high-level GCSE candidates aiming for grades 6-9 The resource contains the following: AQA Assessment objectives for the poetry anthology examination paper Warm-up activity A brief biography of Cecil Day-Lewis A link to an audio of a reading of the poem A link to a copy of the poem (due to copyright; you can easily copy and paste into PowerPoint) A list of high-level terminology for this particular poem as required for higher grades A pyramid of questions which moves from knowledge to evaluation as a way of stretching students’ thinking A student sheet which can be printed off or projected onto the board to record ideas whilst working through questions A short plenary Followed by: Teacher notes -two slides containing ideas for understanding the poem and its methods at a high level which you should likely read before the lesson as preparation for discussion and teaching. How much you ‘teacher-lead’ using these notes, or how much you use them to aid independent learning is up to you. Notes are not definitive, but offer good-grounding in understanding Day-Lewis’ use of method in the poem, with detail on structure and form as well as language in order to reach higher grades (e.g. time, enjambment, verbs, unusual collective nouns and collocations etc.) NEW: THREE PAGE LESSON PLAN ON HOW TO USE EACH SLIDE INCLUDING KEY QUESTIONS, LEARNING AND OUTCOMES The lesson presumes that some previous learning has taken place on what language, form and structure mean, and that students have a good level of understanding of what questions they should ask of poems in order to explore them (e.g. when was it written? how might that influence language choices? is there a specific form? what relevance is the form? how is the poem’s narrative structured? Is there a clear structure? etc.) Kind regards, Englbee x
Lady Macbeth
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Lady Macbeth

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A character revision poster of Lady Macbeth with key quotations on the following themes: Masculinity/Femininity; Appearance and Reality; Children; Guilt; Kingship; Fate, Free Will and Ambition. Quotations are not definitive, but offer a simple way for students to link quotations and theme for revision purposes. Act, scene and line are also given. Would be useful printed onto A3 for classroom revision or A4 for home revision. Bundle of all eight Macbeth character posters found here https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/macbeth-revision-posters-12070022 Original illustrations by mancsunshine (copyright) Best wishes, Englbee x
Richard II
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Richard II

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint of Shakespeare’s Richard II for A level English Literature B, Paper 1A Literary genres, Aspects of Tragedy, Part C These are my notes used with a mid/high A level class. Each scene of Richard II has an individual slide covering the following: structural points, language choices, thematic points. The first two points are significant in making sure students cover ‘the ways in which…’ Shakespeare explores themes. There is also reference to the dramatic tragedy genre as appropriate with thoughts and comments on peripeteia, anagnorisis and catharsis on some slides At the beginning of the PowerPoint there are two additional slides: 1) contextual ideas that students should research prior to reading in order to understand kingship 2) an outline of some dramatic methods within the play to continue to explore the significance of ‘the ways in which…’ the play is constructed / crafted. The PowerPoint might be used in the following ways: as a starting point for you as a teacher new to the play; as a starting point for pupils to read through prior to their own group reading; as a basis for initial ‘teacher-talk’ followed by class discussion (a group could take an area each to build upon - structure, language, theme); as support for independent study of a scene outside of class time; as a starting point for revision. The PowerPoint is fully-adaptable for you to add your own ideas or insert additional slides as needed. Ideas are not definitive, but rather act as a thorough spring-board for further discussion and exploration of Shakespeare’s method and themes. An introduction to Tragedy as a dramatic genre can be found at my shop here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/dramatic-tragedy-genre-an-introduction-12019491 I hope you find this useful. Best wishes, Englbee x
An Inspector Calls Mrs Birling and Eva Act 2
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An Inspector Calls Mrs Birling and Eva Act 2

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint for the end of Act Two on Mrs Birling’s involvement with Eva Smith and her condemnation of Eric. Suitable for mid-high GCSE Literature groups Slides include: LOs and Outcomes A prompt slide with focus questions whilst reading pp40-49 (end of Act 2) Questions to explore Mrs Birling’s class prejudice with example ideas in the teacher notes below An exploration of Mrs Birling’s first name -Sybil - and its links to blindness A tension graph (blank) for students to complete if the teacher wishes with the language of the Inspector and Mrs Birling towards the end of Act 2 A completed tension graph A written response to explore Priestley’s method at the end of Act 2 including a focus on the use of narrative gaps and structure A plenary task to reflect on learning regarding context, language and structure from the day’s lesson. Best wishes, Englbee x
Dramatic Tragedy Genre: An Introduction
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Dramatic Tragedy Genre: An Introduction

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint which offers an introduction to the study of dramatic tragedy as a genre. As well as some didactic commentary, the lesson offers visual and practical tasks for pupils to work through in order to explore and begin to understand the concept of tragedy as a genre. The activities should take one lesson, but may take two. There is also an opportunity for pupils to apply their learning to an extract from Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’ at the end. This PowerPoint will be most useful with higher-level GCSE students aiming for grades 7, 8 and 9 in their study of Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’ or 'Julius Caesar’ (‘Romeo and Juliet’ differs somewhat from traditional dramatic tragedy conventions, but some aspects may be useful), enabling them to explore method and genre as they read, which will help in their reaching higher levels in the examination. Could be adapted for aspiring grade 6 students. The PowerPoint might also be used as a starting point for AQA A Level English Literature students studying ‘King Lear’, ‘Othello’, or ‘Richard II’, or any of the other dramatic tragedies, although further reading and research will be necessary. It will certainly aid less-able A Level students who need a starting point and benefit from visual and practical tasks, and discussion. Link to a similar PowerPoint on Dramatic Comedy here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/dramatic-comedy-genre-an-introduction-11922680
Dramatic Comedy Genre: An Introduction
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Dramatic Comedy Genre: An Introduction

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint which offers an introduction to the study of dramatic comedy as a genre (most likely useful with the study of Shakespeare). The lesson offers visual and practical tasks for pupils to work through in order to explore and begin to understand the concept of comedy as a genre. The activities should take one lesson, but may take two. There is also an opportunity for pupils to apply their learning to an extract from Shakespeare’s ‘Much ado About Nothing’ at the end. This PowerPoint will be most useful with higher-level GCSE students aiming for grades 7,8 and 9 in their study of Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado about Nothing’, enabling them to explore method and genre as they read, which will help in their reaching higher levels in the examination. Could be adapted for aspiring grade 6 students. The PowerPoint might also be used as a starting point for A Level English Literature students although further reading and research will be necessary. It will certainly aid less able A Level students who benefit from visual and practical tasks, and discussion (I have used a version of this PowerPoint as a starting point with an AS group for coursework under an old spec). Best wishes, Englbee x
Climbing My Grandfather
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Climbing My Grandfather

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint which explores ‘Climbing My Grandfather’ in preparation for the AQA Literature Examination The PowerPoint and accompanying teacher notes are aimed at high-level GCSE candidates aiming for grades 6-9 The resource contains the following: AQA Assessment objectives for the poetry anthology examination paper Warm-up activity A brief biography of Andrew Waterhouse A link to an audio of a reading of the poem A link to a copy of the poem (due to copyright; you can easily copy and paste into PowerPoint) A list of high-level terminology for this particular poem as required for higher grades A pyramid of questions which moves from knowledge to evaluation as a way of stretching students’ thinking A student sheet which can be printed off or projected onto the board to record ideas whilst working through questions A short plenary Followed by: Teacher notes -three slides containing ideas for understanding the poem and its methods at a high level which you should likely read before the lesson as preparation for discussion and teaching. How much you ‘teacher-lead’ using these notes, or how much you use them to aid independent learning is up to you. Notes are not definitive, but offer good-grounding in understanding Waterhouse’s use of method in the poem, with detail on structure and form as well as language in order to reach higher grades (e.g. Use of extended metaphor, mountaineering lexis, narrative verse etc.) NEW: THREE PAGE LESSON PLAN ON HOW TO USE EACH SLIDE INCLUDING KEY QUESTIONS, LEARNING AND OUTCOMES The lesson presumes that some previous learning has taken place on what language, form and structure mean, and that students have a good level of understanding of what questions they should ask of poems in order to explore them (e.g. when was it written? how might that influence language choices? is there a specific form? what relevance is the form? how is the poem’s narrative structured? Is there a clear structure? etc.) Kind regards, Englbee x
Adjectives
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Adjectives

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint on adjectives. Suitable for high-ability KS3, mid-to high ability KS4, and intermediate ESOL. Suitable for home-learning. The PowerPoint introduces the student to five different adjective types: positive; negative; comparative; superlative; and descriptive. Includes: *an explanation of the function of each adjective type within the English language *an example list of the type of adjective discussed *three differentiated challenge exercises for each adjective type with examples for students to choose from (less able might choose challenge one, with increasingly able choosing challenges two and three OR students could work from challenges one to three) Teachers can choose to teach the adjectives types in any order, dip in or out, or select as necessary. Could be used as a series of starter activities or as a longer grammar lesson. Could also be set remotely for home-learning as an independent study exercise The PowerPoint is not definitive, but offers a clear approach to understanding and using different types of adjectives. Best wishes, Englbee x
Love and Relationships
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Love and Relationships

15 Resources
15 fully-adaptable PowerPoints covering each of the Love and Relationship poems in the AQA English Literature GCSE Poetry Anthology. Suitable for those students aiming for grades 7-9. Each PowerPoint contains: AQA Assessment objectives for the poetry anthology examination paper A brief biography of the poet A link to an audio reading of the poems and a listening task before reading A list of high-level terminology for each poem as required for higher grades, and as a ‘way-in’ to the poems A pyramid of critical questions which moves from knowledge to evaluation as a way of stretching higher students’ thinking, rather than you simply offering didactic teaching/leading questions A copy, or link to a copy of the poem (due to copyright of some poems; you can easily copy and paste into PowerPoint) A student sheet which can be printed off or projected onto the board as a structure to record ideas whilst working through critical questions A short plenary Followed by: Teacher notes -two/three slides containing ideas for understanding each poem and its methods at a high level which you should likely read before the lesson as preparation for discussion and teaching. How much you ‘teacher-lead’ using these notes, or whether you use them to aid independent learning is up to you. Notes are not definitive, but offer good-grounding in understanding poets’ use of method in the poems, with detail on structure and form as well as language in order to reach higher grades. NEW: THREE PAGE LESSON PLAN ON HOW TO USE EACH SLIDE INCLUDING KEY QUESTIONS, LEARNING AND OUTCOMES The lessons presume that some previous learning has taken place on what language, form and structure mean, and that students have a good level of understanding of what questions they should ask of poems in order to explore them (e.g. when was it written? how might that influence language choices? is there a specific form? what relevance is the form? how is the poem’s narrative structured and why? etc.) You can find revision posters for your students nearer exam time here https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/love-and-relationships-revision-12183742 Kind regards, Englbee x
Walking Away Revision
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Walking Away Revision

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A high-level revision sheet (PDF) of Cecil Day-Lewis’ ‘Walking Away’ for students aiming for levels, 6-9 in the new GCSE Literature Paper 2 The revision sheet is laid out in sections with minimal graphics to allow effective revision of ideas and method. Ideas are written in a brief format rather than being too text/colour heavy to aid key learning and memory The method focus is rooted in structure and form as well as language choices in order to hit higher band criteria. Only a few choices for each as AQA stresses depth as opposed to breadth to achieve top grades. There are suggested links to ‘Follower’ and evaluative questions to consider in a potential essay conclusion. The sheet is not definitive, and students should have a much deep knowledge of the poem from class studies; however, it will help as an aid for themes and methods regarding the second, unprinted poem in the examination in which they will need to draw on their memory. Please note the preview shows only a small section of the revision sheet. Best wishes, Englbee x
An Inspector Calls: The Inspector Act 1
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An Inspector Calls: The Inspector Act 1

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A fully-adaptable PowerPoint on the Initial Characterisation of the Inspector in Act 1 of an Inspector Calls for mid-to-higher level groups. Prior to the lesson, students will need to have read from the Inspector’s entrance and the subsequent interrogation of Birling’s involvement with Eva before using the resource. The resource makes use of skills such as questioning the text and making links between the characterisation of Birling and the Inspector as foils. The focus is on the language of the characters and significantly, the contrasting stage directions. Includes: LOs and skills The significance of the bell ring and what Birling is saying at that point Priestley’s characterisation of the Inspector in the stage directions as a contrast to Birling and the family Significance of the Inspector’s name Significance of the Inspector’s news (about a young woman) Significance of the Inspector’s methodology Significance of the contrasting stage directions in how Birling and the Inspector should deliver their lines. A reflection on Birling and the Inspector as foils in terms of beliefs and values A plenary slide in which to reflect on learning and skills from the lesson Under most slides there are indicative answers in the notes section for teachers to help them. Students will likely come up with other valid answers so these are only a guide. Best wishes, Englbee x
An Inspector Calls: Analysis -  Inspector's Final Speech
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An Inspector Calls: Analysis - Inspector's Final Speech

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A high-level analysis of the Inspector’s Final Speech in the play, An Inspector Calls. The analysis is 600 words long approximately. Offered as both an adaptable Word doc. and PDF. The short essay offers a high degree of close analysis of language and method as well as conceptualised interpretations in order to hit those top levels (7-9). Useful for any high-ability class studying A Inspector Calls. Best wishes, Englbee x
An Inspector Calls Context Free Lesson
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An Inspector Calls Context Free Lesson

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A free pre-teaching lesson on An Inspector Calls for AQA English Literature Paper 2 Part A. For high-ability students aiming for Band 6 (grades 7-9). The lesson contains the following: *Learning Objectives which also incorporate some learning skills (can link to Learning to Learn or Building Learning Power, or any other such learning skills) *A link to the AQA mark scheme with exploration of what skills are needed for Band 6 linked to AOs 1 2 &3 *Keyword word-clouds in order to introduce differences in society’s mores and attitudes between 1912 and 1945/6 *A brief description of changes in society and JB Priestley’s roles and beliefs *A paired activity in which students explore the differences between 1912 and 1945/6 further. This can be done as a paper and glue exercise, a written task or as a whole class using IT drag and drop if preferred *Further exploration of context between 1918 and 1945. Further explanation of writer’s intent *A task exploring form as a mode of context, which can be worked through in pairs or individually . Exploration of what a morality play and a detective drama might contain with whole-class feedback. *A link to an YouTube video (no affiliation) which students might listen to for homework and make notes upon to further understand context *A plenary in which learning skills used to explore ideas are reflected upon Please leave a review if you find this resource useful. Best wishes, Englbee x
Writing to Describe
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Writing to Describe

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A free AQA English Language Q5 Practice Question to save you time. If you like what you see, there are 10 more at the link below for a small cost. https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/writing-to-describe-tasks-11915510 Best wishes, Englbee x
Much Ado About Nothing
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Much Ado About Nothing

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A free poster for your classroom wall with key character descriptions and quotations for Benedick from Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado about Nothing’. Could also be printed A4 for students to glue into books. Might also be useful to upload onto school intranet for revision purposes. Especially useful with lower ability students, and also those who find revising and note-making difficult for GCSE English Literature. Other ‘Much Ado about Nothing’ Posters can be found as a here for a small sum. https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/much-ado-about-nothing-posters-12020347 Best wishes, Englbee x