An introduction to English spelling and a brief history of the language

An introduction to English spelling and a brief history of the language

This lesson and accompanying resources act as a good introduction to English spelling. The PowerPoint goes through what to expect from the lesson, I followed the structure below: 1. How do you feel about spelling? I usually make notes on the blank PowerPoint page the different connotations 'spelling' has for students 2. Common spelling myths- students given a list of common spelling myths as discussion points, students asked if they think the provided statements are true or false. This usually sparks a good discussion with my groups. The PowerPoint slides which follow show which statements are true/false and also gives an in-depth explanation of each. 3. The PowerPoint contains a 10 minute video about the history of the English language (produced by The Open University- available on YouTube) with an accompanying booklet I have designed myself. 4. The booklet guides learners through the different stages of the development of the English language and the different international influences. There are dictionary activities and sentence writing activities throughout. 5. The final activity is a sorting activity where students sort the different words into the correct categories of Viking origin, French origin, Anglo Saxon and Arabic origin.
Jadelodell
Writing pack for Functional Skills English Level 2

Writing pack for Functional Skills English Level 2

1. General hints and tips for the writing tasks on the FS English written exam, covering layout, language, SPAG etc. 2. Ways to write engaging introductions to articles for the FS English written exam. Looks at using 'When' to begin an introduction. With examples and practise scenarios for students to experiment with this way of writing introductions. The final task is to choose one of the scenarios and produce the while article. 3. Activity/worksheet aimed at helping students to develop their ideas in article writing. A scenario about planning permission is provided, with the task . Instructions ask students to work together to plan their article- this can be adjusted to other class needs. 4. A layout and introduction to the scenario from resource three, useful for those students who struggle to get started on tasks, also a good way to re-cap layouts. Can be used to differentiate for weaker students in the class.
Jadelodell
Pack of 4  writing starter tasks- great for a warm up, debate or discussion starter

Pack of 4 writing starter tasks- great for a warm up, debate or discussion starter

Four worksheets with different topics for students to write their personal views and opinions on. These are great as a warm up to get students thinking and to start a class debate or discussion. (The topics chosen can be sensitive) 1. Knife crime in schools- should mandatory knife-related first aid be taught in schools? 2. Life skills in schools- are life skills such as cooking, budgeting, laundry etc. more important than maths equations and English grammar? 3. Social media? Is social media ruining our lives and our personal relationships? 4. Dogs and their owners- should dog owners be prosecuted when their dog attacks another person?
Jadelodell
Entry Level 3  Functional Skills English Writing revision pack

Entry Level 3 Functional Skills English Writing revision pack

The first worksheet provides the required layouts for the different written tasks on EL3 writing exams, this can be used a student guide or revision. The second activity is in mock exam format with two written tasks about buying a faulty mobile phone. There are also hits and tips for each question, so it could be suited to a revision class or to teach exam techniques. This is particularly tailored to City and Guilds qualifications but can be used for any written practise at this level.
Jadelodell
Entry Level 3 English writing revision booklet with activities, tips, practise, questions, gapfill

Entry Level 3 English writing revision booklet with activities, tips, practise, questions, gapfill

This booklet acts as a revision guide for the EL3 FS English qualification, specifically City and Guilds but can be tailored to other exam boards. 1. A gap fill exercise about what to expect on the exam 2. How to use the question to make a plan and draft 3. Making your plan 4. Writing your draft 5. Writing your final piece 6. Space to complete the final piece. The guide takes students through the whole process of a written task with spaces for them to write ideas/plan/draft/final throughout. There is also a short vocab re-cap and formal/informal language recap.
Jadelodell
Entry Level 3 Functional Skills English writing practise- customer feedback form

Entry Level 3 Functional Skills English writing practise- customer feedback form

This activity is aimed at EL3 Functional Skills English written exam practise. The activity gives an exam type question, with room for planning and drafting before space for the final written piece, which particularly aligns with the City and Guilds qualification. The basis is a customer feedback form after visiting a local restaurant. The activity can be adapted to group or paired planning to suit the needs of the group, or as a mock exam task.
Jadelodell
Entry Level 3, Level 1 and 2 body language gap fill for SLC element

Entry Level 3, Level 1 and 2 body language gap fill for SLC element

These two worksheets are gap-fill exercises are focused on the different elements of body language, to go alongside the speaking listening and communications elements of the FS English qualification. It can be used as a warm up or re-cap activity. The EL3 worksheet gives a space per letter for the answer whereas the L1/2 does not. Simple exercise to reinforce body language and its importance in SLC.
Jadelodell
Writing a letter of complaint lesson plan & resources (Functional Skills L1 and L2)

Writing a letter of complaint lesson plan & resources (Functional Skills L1 and L2)

The Power Point presentation goes through the key aspects of writing a letter of complaint. The lesson was originally aimed at FS English level 1 and 2 students but can be adapted to other levels. Activities include: 1) Main letter writing task - instructions on PP presentation 2) Fun warm up task- students chose the true and false complaints (answers on PP presentation) 3) A short task with key phrases which may be found in a letter of complaint. Each phrases has specific preposition missing, which students must choose from the list provided. Idea for a warm up task of closing/revision task. 4) Printable checklist corresponding to lesson content for students to refer to when writing their letter of complaint
Jadelodell
An introduction to presentation skills, with YouTube video clips.

An introduction to presentation skills, with YouTube video clips.

This lesson introduces students to presentation skills, with dos and don'ts shown through YouTube clips. Lesson structure: 1) Lesson aims and objectives- Aim: To provide students with the required presentation skills to succeed in their speaking and listening exam. Objectives: For students to develop their own ideas about what makes a good presentation. For students to understand the visual elements which make a good PowerPoint presentation To watch video clips of presentations, identify and list the good and bad elements they observe 2) Group discussion/pair work task- what do students think makes a good presentation? I personally use flip chart paper and have students present their ideas back, however this can be adapted. 3) Two YouTube clips (links on PowerPoint) one a good example, one a bad example. Students can be asked to take notes in pairs or individually, for feedback. After discussion, a list of answers/responses on each video is shown on the presentation. 4) Students asked what they think are the six most important pieces of advice when conducting a presentation. Worksheet for this task is provided. I used this lesson specifically for L1 and L2 Functional Skills English students in preparation for their speaking and listening exams, however it can be used as a more general introduction to presentation skills.
Jadelodell
Writing emails- looking at the structure, layout language and techniques used, with two activities

Writing emails- looking at the structure, layout language and techniques used, with two activities

1) Warm up task (word document) photographs of public spelling mistakes for students to identify and correct. Some are amusing and ridiculous and this quick task will get students thinking. 2) Main lesson aims and objectives: Aim: For students to recap on spelling punctuation and grammar, and write an email response in line with the FS English writing exam. Objectives: Recognise and correct the mistakes in the proof reading task. Work as a group to complete and provide feedback on the task. Write an informal email in reply to the warm up task, using the correct language and features in line with FS English exam mark scheme. 3) Example email- discussion point for the layout and different components. The example has many spelling mistakes, and I split it up into 4 sections , allocated groups (or pairs) one section each to identify and correct the spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes. The different sections are split on to separate slides in order to aid feedback. 4) Task: using the email from the previous task- students asked to compose a response- instructions and a checklist given on the slide- this will give students practice of writing informal emails which can be applied to wider skills. 5) Task: writing a formal email - instructions shown on the slide. This task can be given as homework if there is no time. The task is primarily geared towards the FS English exam but can be used for more broad and wider skills.
Jadelodell
An introduction to simple, compound and complex sentences with presentation, handouts & worksheets

An introduction to simple, compound and complex sentences with presentation, handouts & worksheets

This lesson looks at the different types of sentences students can use in their writing, the lesson aims to give students the understanding of each sentences construction, and in turn enhance their written skills and variation of sentences they can use correctly. 1) Lesson aims and objectives: Aim: To understand the different types of sentences we can use in our writing Objectives: To see the difference between three different types of sentences To identify examples of three different types of sentences To write your own examples of the three different types of sentences 2) Slide displays three sentences (one simple, compound and complex) and students are asked to discuss/make notes (up to you) on what differences they can pick out between the three. Hopefully students will note the length, use of connective words, punctuation etc. If they do not, the teacher can try to prompt these answers. 3) An explanation for each of the three sentences is displayed alongside the previous sentences, so students can make links with the descriptions and the examples. This will likely require more explanation and possible more examples. 4) Further examples shown to further enhance understanding and provide further discussion points. At this stage I usually ask students to write their own examples of each sentence to begin practising, and have them feed their ideas back. But this can be adapted dependant on your group/level. 5) Activity: Students given a short extract about The Men In Black (print out available in this resource) and asked to label the different sentences- instructions given on the print out and the presentation. 6) Answers to the task shown on the presentation. 7) Recap task - requires coloured response cards- six sentences displayed on the presentation, one at a time, and students to hold up the relevant response card. Instructions and answers displayed on the presentation. 8) Extension task included- sentences for students to identify as simple, compound or complex.
Jadelodell
Tenses re-cap, past present and future using celebrity profiles as examples good for ESOL learners

Tenses re-cap, past present and future using celebrity profiles as examples good for ESOL learners

1) Starter task: a grid of verbs requiring students to convert them into the past tense, some regular and some irregular. This task can be done individually or in pairs/teams with a competitive element. 2)This task works really well of ESOL learners/classes as it is a fun way to practice using the three different tenses. I usually introduce the celebrity profiles individually, there is one written in each specific tense. Students can read through the passage together or alone, taking note of the prominent tense. They then use this as an example to produce their own profile in the specific tense. I also like to provide students with coloured paper, different pictures and ways to decorate their pieces of work.
Jadelodell
An introduction to homophones, common examples, visual quizzes and an exercise worksheet

An introduction to homophones, common examples, visual quizzes and an exercise worksheet

This lesson aims to provide an introduction to homophones, common examples and their uses in sentences and spelling tips. 1) Lesson aim and objectives: Aim: To introduce students to homophones and how to use them in context. Objectives: Define what a homophone is. List examples of common homophones and write own sentences. Correct sentences using homophones. 2) Initially I like to ask students if any body has any prior knowledge of homophones, before showing the definitions on the first slide of the presentation. 3) Discussion about how homophones can change the meanings of sentences, using comedic illustrations. 4) Some common mistakes that may be familiar with students; their there they're, too two to, where were we're. Dependant on ability level it could be useful to ask students to correctly use each of the nine homophones by writing sentences, however some groups may not need this practise. 5) Shows the correct use of each. 6) Short quiz using images of common homophone pairs, example: Board and bored. The images make the quiz more fun. Students can complete this individually, in pairs or as a group activity. Answers displayed on slide. 7) Some tips for helping students remember homophone pairs and the correct usage. 8) A second, more difficult quiz again using images, which works well if students work together in pairs. Dependant on ability you may need to provide clues or allow students to use dictionaries. 9) Worksheet where students chose the correct homophones to use in a sentence. Again, dictionaries may be useful. Or the attached 'homophone bank' which has the definitions of each homophone pair can be used as a 'help sheet'. The aim of the homophone bank is that students can add new homophone pairs to it as the come across them.
Jadelodell
Functional Skills English Level one and two - Writing articles lesson plan and resources

Functional Skills English Level one and two - Writing articles lesson plan and resources

The lesson is led by the Power Point presentation, starting with aims and objectives for the lesson. 1) The first activity gives students a list of funny article headlines for the students to decide of they are real or fake. This is a fun warm up task which usually gets the students laughing! The Power Point also gives the answers to the activity and can provide discussion points. 2) The initial tasks gives students two articles to read and comment on; one from a gardening magazine and one from a music magazine. The Power Point and printable worksheet both have instructions for the task. This task then leads into a group discussion. 3) Another short task depicts an article layout and asks for students to label the different components of an article. This task works well with an interactive smart board, but can be adapted to suit relevant resources. 4) The final task is a written task, asking students to write their own article on a subject of their choice. Dependant on the group you could provide some ideas to choose from. Instructions are listed on the Power Point. 5) I have also uploaded an optional extension task which asks students to match the headlines with the publications they think they have come from.
Jadelodell
Writing speeches, speech techniques, writing to persuade, inform and inspire

Writing speeches, speech techniques, writing to persuade, inform and inspire

Lesson on writing speeches, originally aimed at Level one and two Functional Skills English students but can be adapted to suit other lessons/learners/levels. Students are introduced to the different language techniques used within speeches, such as; alliteration, the rule of three, facts and figures, emotive language and rhetorical questions. The presentation includes instructions for tasks, answers to tasks and discussion points. Pack includes: 1) Power Point presentation to guide the lesson, with activity instructions, definitions, key information and tips for speech writing. 2) Identify speech techniques activity worksheet/exercise- students given a speech to label the different techniques from the ideas given. 3) A printable MLK extract for students to label on their own (no key provided). 4) A matching exercise with techniques and examples. The information required for the 'Drink driving' speech writing task can be found on The Skills Workshop website for free.
Jadelodell
Getting students talking- Plan your own charity event in small groups

Getting students talking- Plan your own charity event in small groups

The Power Point presentation begins with the lesson aims and objectives- the lesson is based around students working together to plan their own charity event, developing a time plan and designing a poster for their event, then presenting their event posters to the rest of the group. 1) Teacher introduction required- teacher will need to explain what we will be doing for the lesson, and information on the PP will reinforce this. 2) Task one- group discussion about the sample event poster. Discussion points displayed on the PP presentation, teacher to ensure students recognise the key elements. 3) Task two (main task) Students are given a time planning sheet and flip chart paper to plan their own charity event. The time plan embeds maths, as the students will be displaying time information and using numbers. Students work together to create and plan their event, before presenting their finished posters to the rest of the group. Dependent on the group, you can go into as much or little detail as you like with the events. Also you can provide students with even ideas or let them develop their own. This lesson is very adaptable. 4) Presentation of events- students can present their ideas and posters to the rest of the group- students can be encouraged to ask further questions, again dependent on teacher preference and the level of the group. 5) I have also uploaded an optional extension tasks which lists a variety of discussion topics for students to respond to. Keeping in with the speaking and listening theme.
Jadelodell
An introduction to Functional Skills English exam discussions Level 1 and 2

An introduction to Functional Skills English exam discussions Level 1 and 2

1) The first Power Point presentation introduces students to the requirements of the FS English L1 and L2 speaking and listening examinations, it is very much focused on teacher input and giving students the relevant information. 2) The second Power Point presentation focuses on practising and discussing the skills required to take part in a good discussion. The first task requires students to have red and green response cards, which are cheap and easy to create. The first task ask students to agree or disagree with a series of controversial issues. Students respond using their coloured cards an then the teacher can nominate students to expand on their opinions. This activity provides a good base for discussions and opinions. 3) Next is a group task (for which I use flip chart paper and pens and split students into small groups) where students are asked to make notes on what they think makes a good discussion and then present their ideas back to the group. Instructions are displayed on the PP presentation. 4) Students are then given a list of the requirements, which they can use to compare to their own ideas. 5) Students are then shown a video clip of a discussion, to watch make notes and discuss. A link to this YouTube clip is displayed on the PP presentation.
Jadelodell