Hero image

Extension English

I sell a variety of English resources for teachers to use with students from age 9 to18. Specialising in creative writing,comprehensions, GCSE, IGCSE and A level.

I sell a variety of English resources for teachers to use with students from age 9 to18. Specialising in creative writing,comprehensions, GCSE, IGCSE and A level.
The Consequences of Mispunctuation!
KnibbnobKnibbnob

The Consequences of Mispunctuation!

(0)
Visually appealing and uncluttered Powerpoint which explains the role and importance of punctuation marks in creating clear meanings and avoiding errors. Students have a series of amusing ‘mispunctuation’ examples to work through, probably in pairs but you could do this as a class activity. Simple and effective way to reinforce the importance of clear punctuation and expression. Aimed at KS3 students, but could work equally well with older GCSE English Language students still uncertain about how crucial sharp s.p.a.g is for high directed writing tasks.
The Ultimate Guide to Embedding Quotations: with tasks based on Blake's poem 'London' plus answers!
KnibbnobKnibbnob

The Ultimate Guide to Embedding Quotations: with tasks based on Blake's poem 'London' plus answers!

(0)
Really useful, 10-page detailed adaptable and accessible 3-part guide to embedded quotations, including a set of guidelines, a 3-part focus activity, sample answers, contextual images on the London slums and attached focus poem (Blake’s ‘London.’) Resource is ideal for GCSE but also good with older A level and even able year 9 students, so it’s a great value and flexible resource. It summarises what embedded quotations are, explaining their usefulness in essay responses. The pack then offers students a chance to try out their new understanding with an activity on Blake’s ‘London’ I have included a copy of it plus supporting contextual pictures in the pack. The poem is a good clear copy with relevant copyright-free imagery to inspire your students I also provide 3 sides of sample responses to the ‘embed your own quotations’ tasks, so the students can gain a deeper understanding and benefit from ‘mini guides’ to key parts of the poem. The teacher can adapt the lesson to ask students to write super-short punchy embedded quotation sentences, or ask them to create extended paragraphed responses, as show in the three sample answers.