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(based on 76 reviews)

Each of the resources uploaded here are the ones that I have had the most fun or success teaching, or, if I have created them specifically for my shop, it is with a mind to what I know children will like. Whenever I have finished creating them I feel a sense of excitement, as I know the lessons will engage. Teaching and learning should be fun for adults and children alike. When children are comfortable, they are most receptive to learning. I hope that this shop and resources reflect that ethos.

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Each of the resources uploaded here are the ones that I have had the most fun or success teaching, or, if I have created them specifically for my shop, it is with a mind to what I know children will like. Whenever I have finished creating them I feel a sense of excitement, as I know the lessons will engage. Teaching and learning should be fun for adults and children alike. When children are comfortable, they are most receptive to learning. I hope that this shop and resources reflect that ethos.
Rocks Year 3
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Rocks Year 3

(1)
Whole lesson Year 3. Meets National Curriculum Objective: compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties. This lesson has been prepared as an exciting practical start to the topic of rocks and soils - ideal for the first lesson in a unit of work. This resource pack includes: Lesson plan Lesson presentation Printed activity/recording sheet Printed learning objective Rock name labels (editable) Name that rock printout - (identification chart) for help identifying the rock as an alternative to pre-labelling. Children are given an input based on properties of different materials and are then asked to consider the properties of different rocks, by examining them. After that they decide how to sort/group them, based on the properties they have just observed. I’ve delivered this lesson for two years without the slide show and the printouts, and I know it will be better for it - the children always enjoy it, regardless - and it enthuses them for the rest for the topic - this is simply tightening/smartening up. Tip: If you are spending the whole afternoon on the activity, use setting circles/hoops and encourage children to create physical Venn diagrams with the rock samples, according to their own sorting criteria written onto post-it notes (as in the last slides of the slide show). Please note: you will need access to rock samples to deliver this lesson - I have left editable boxes on the rock labels, as well as including the most likely to be used rocks. (I selected 7 types that could be gathered together fairly easily) I hope you enjoy using this resource. I would be grateful if you could leave a review.
Compare and Contrast the Diets of Different Animals
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Compare and Contrast the Diets of Different Animals

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A pick-up-and-go lesson covering the Year 3 National Curriculum objective, compare and contrast the diets of different animals including pets. This presentation includes vivid images of different animals alongside their diets in general terms. It prompts children to think about what their own pets eat, or mustn’t have and links to a BBC classroom clip. I have used this lesson in Year 3, and the children were exceptionally engaged. The activity creates an imaginary scenario, where there is a new zoo keeper who has lost her notes explaining which bucket of food is to be taken to which enclosure. Children help by matching the menu with the enclosure. This resource includes: lesson plan, activity, lesson presentation, and printed L.O. Tip: Print the activity on the ‘two sides per sheet’ setting to fit into books nicely without wasting too much paper and ink, leaving space for additional writing below. I hope you enjoy using this resource. I would be grateful if you could leave a review once it has been used in class.
Ancient Greek Food (Tasting)
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Ancient Greek Food (Tasting)

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An introduction to the diet of the ancient Greeks by tasting! This resource can be used at the start of a learning journey on Ancient Greece, to engage, or at the end. I have also used it the day before a ‘Fabulous Finish’ (Ancient Greek Day) where the children dressed in costumes, designed their own Greek pottery and carved in clay, held a mini Olympic games tournament and then marched into a feast, giving due honour to Zeus before eating. It worked well in this manner, because the children were already aware of the types of foods they would be sampling and why. The resource includes: Presentation on the diet of the Ancient Greeks. A printable Menu - edit on the ppt to include the food you have bought Slides to show what foods are going to be sampled A printout where children can rate the food, based on its appearance and texture and taste etc. (Print from ppt) A suggested follow up task - where children design their own menus, of Ancient Greek style food, using effusive persuasive language. All the food types included, are easy to source, and I found Aldi/Lidl extremely good value for 60 pupils. Most children gagged on the anchovies, but it was part of the fun - they all loved the goats cheese/greek yoghurt squeezy honey combo (and some were eating the honey simply on its own!) I hope you enjoy using this resource.
French Jungle Animals
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French Jungle Animals

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Les Animaux de la Jungle. Now with recorded French for each piece of vocabulary used or introduced. This is an engaging way to introduce vocabulary for animals that live in the Indian jungle. It would support a topic of India or simply use as something different to the usual animals that are taught. Games: Listen to the animal sound and say the animal that makes the noise (C’est quel animal?) Look at the picture closely and state which one is missing (Que manque-t-il) Revise numbers at the same time by watching the moving pictures closely and counting how many animals there were altogether. (Combien de…?) Also includes: A three-page worksheet that includes simple cut/stick, matching activities and a wordsearch using the new vocabulary. The powerpoint is available in two options: Autoplay soundbites for non speakers of French (learn alongside!). This duplicates slides and auto plays all French phrases. Sound clips included when you click on the icon - to vary interest and give another voice for children to listen to. The worksheets are supplied in Microsoft Word format so they are fully editable. Note: the Power Point presentations are animated which cannot be viewed in preview mode.
Skateboard Angles
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Skateboard Angles

3 Resources
Three resources that use skateboarding as a means of teaching angles. Identifying different angles types (uses skateboard angles for real life examples) Knowing the number of degrees in a full turn, half turn and quarter turn, using skater trick terminology to engage Posters for a working wall using real life skating angles. These resources complement a whole learning journey based on the theme of skating. If you like these, you may also wish to consider the English unit of work that accompanies them. https://bit.ly/2pR5obE I would be grateful if you could leave a review, once you have used these resources.
Boys Narrative Writing
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Boys Narrative Writing

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The Bubble Wrap Boy by Phil Earle This unit of planning and resources is written specifically to engage reluctant readers, particularly boys. The initial weeks cover a range of reading and writing skills, (descriptive writing, character analysis, even cinquain poetry - skater style!) The Bubble Wrap Boy is an enjoyable book suitable for ages 10-15. It would work well in Year 6 or Year 7/8 intervention classes, where they keep the same teacher all day. It centres on a geeky teenager, Charlie Han, who reinvents himself as a skating legend. His equally geeky friend gains kudos through his graffiti art. https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/188528/the-bubble-wrap-boy/ I have taught it in Year 5 and so that is what the national curriculum standards reference. My lower-ability writers’ standards shot up after this unit and standards of the whole class improved exactly where the gaps were, as this is how it was planned. The unit includes a mixture of discrete grammar lessons and lessons that build on from one another. The main focus is how to write an extended narrative - with each skill building logically on from the next. It leads into a project of extended writing at the end, this is key to improving stamina and ongoing writing ability. While this English unit of work focuses on writing, I strongly recommend that the book is focussed on during daily reading sessions prior to the main English writing session. It is assumed that the teacher will be able to read chapters outloud with the children outside of the main writing session, and ideally, the children themselves will have plenty of opportunity to engage with and read the text, too. This text has some strong themes in it, such as bullying, loss and family deception. It has some mild bad language and teenage-style comments that the teacher should be aware of and read with discretion with lower ages, particularly in Year 5. I had such fun teaching this unit, as we delivered it as a whole learning journey, where the children studied graffiti and urban art, too, and we visited the local skate parks, did skating angles etc in maths. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. If you like these resources, I would be grateful if you could leave a review for others.
Riddles and Puzzles (End of term)
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Riddles and Puzzles (End of term)

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This is a slide show that contains 22 slides of puzzles and riddles. They are easy enough to guess the answers but hard enough to present a fun challenge for primary school-aged children. I used these riddles as part of an English lesson in Year 5 and they were very well received. It also includes a worksheet where the riddles have been differentiated to solve in groups as an alternative to a whole-class activity. This is a light hearted end-of-term fun activity for the children who are tired, and in need of something a bit lighter, but it will nonetheless develop their critical thinking skills, and hopefully foster a love of these word-play type problems. The presentation includes slides explaining what riddles are and how they work, and giving several guided examples before launching into the whole class slides. Each separate riddle is presented on one slide, which is then animated to reveal the answer, alongside an explanation of any that may need further clarification. Having carried out this lesson previously where children simply read the printed riddles from a worksheet, I am really pleased with the slide show, as the pictures add another element of deception - you are further able to mislead their thinking with subtle/subconscious red-herrings! I hope you have fun using this resource. I would be grateful if you could leave a review.
Crack the Code (Maths is Awesome)
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Crack the Code (Maths is Awesome)

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This is a resource prepared for key stage 2 to be used in the maths session either in the first few days of the September term, or as a structured maths activity as part of a transition. Children solve the calculations/problems to find a number that corresponds to a letter. The letters spell out a phrase. The secret phrase is ‘Maths is fun!’ or ‘Maths is awesome’ when completed. Children can then go on to create their own phrases/coded words. I have used this activity in Year 5, but because there are four different levels of challenge, this activity could easily be carried out in lower years, or even Year 6. The children enjoyed it - because the phrase is the same for all levels, children can race to solve it first (swear them to secrecy, by asking them to only whisper the phrase to you for a reward if they are correct). Works well if partners are working together - if the sheet is too hard, or one question on the sheet is too challenging, they can always look at the question on an easier sheet. I found this exercise to be helpful to get an overall sense of how the class were with number and their ability and confidence with a range of maths overall - probably as helpful as a test for a quick sense of where a new class is at, but without any of the threat. It gave me some good ideas about where to pitch my planning for the next couple of weeks, whilst I got to know them and their strengths/gaps better, so I would consider it of much more value than simply a ‘holding’ teacher-meet type exercise. Tip: Set the printer to double sided, so they can flip over to create their own code once they have found the answer. I hope you enjoy using this resource. I would be grateful if you could leave a review, once used in class.
Creating my own Coat of Arms
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Creating my own Coat of Arms

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A ppt presentation that I have used to support a Tudor themed day as part of a fabulous finish to a learning journey. It could equally be adapted for a PSHE style lesson on recognising strengths and sense of identity, or an ice breaker activity for a new class. Includes printout of heraldic shield.
The Geography of Ancient Greece
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The Geography of Ancient Greece

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A ppt (including differentiated activity printouts) that gives an overview to where modern day Greece is located, the make up of the land and climate. It then includes major cities and reference points of ancient Greece. (All images/maps sourced via Google images) This is for KS 2 and has supported a Year 5 introduction to ancient Greece, alongside timeline lessons and more general introductions.
Spag Practice Tests and Revision Guides (SATs)
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Spag Practice Tests and Revision Guides (SATs)

3 Resources
Bundle consists of: Practice SPaG test in Sat style with similar questions (Test 1, Test 2, Answers) Daily Grammar drills - The spelling and grammar rules with a practice example, and a task based on the above test questions - ideal for daily/twice daily input in the period leading up to SATs. One additional grammar test, designed for progression with slightly harder vocabulary used throughout but similar questions.
E-Safety - Fake or Real?
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E-Safety - Fake or Real?

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This is a whole lesson encouraging children to think critically and evaluate whether the information they see on the internet is real or fake. This resource includes: lesson (or session) plan and an activity. The plan details how to encourage children to think about what we use the internet for, and through the use of classroom clips introduces the idea of fake news. Children are given tips about how to evaluate whether a story etc might be fake or genuine. The activity is to look at a screen shot of a news story/twitter feed/web page/email/viral photo and decide whether it is is real or fake. Children click the answer each time (real or fake) -most are fake - and then there is extra information about how they might have reasoned this, what clues or warnings there were etc. These are mostly real-life examples. Although the activity has been entitled ‘Fake News Spotter’, the scope of the lesson is actually much broader than ‘Fake News’ as it also touches upon scams, trusted sources of information and using the internet for research. Tip: The activity is designed to be completed by the children individually/in pairs in ppt, but if that is not possible, it can be delivered as a whole class activity, or the slides can be printed and children can examine them in groups or pairs and sort them into a pile of ‘real’ or ‘fake’ before the answers are talked through as a whole class. This makes a nice reading-based activity in mixed ability pairs - perfect if there are carousels of activities taking places as part of a whole school approach to Safer Internet Day. I’m really pleased with this lesson which I have used with Year 4. I did notice that, when using the ppt, they all were very keen simply to see if they were correct or incorrect and whizzed through the slides without really reading the important information, so I would advise that you put in place some incentives to ensure that they actually read the slides - perhaps partner has to ask a question based on the content, or each taking it in turns to read the slide aloud before moving on - I had to make at least one quarter of the class go back over it again when finished. I hope you enjoy using this resource - there is so much misinformation out there, even for us adults - anything that helps our young people think more carefully about what they see or share, or how they select what sites they visit, is, in my view, a good thing!
Hyphens
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Hyphens

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Most of the resources I’ve seen regarding hyphens focus on compounding. This Power Point (with printable resources within) focuses simply on other situations when hyphens might be used. It will build upon an introductory lesson, but could also be used as an introduction lesson, too. It is not too bogged down by strict grammar rules - giving examples instead. It uses humorous photographs throughout, as a means of keeping children engaged - please use with care to the age/suitability for your own class groups. Suitable for: Year 5 (Hap) or 6 (Pitched at this level - map) or beyond for lap. I would be grateful if you would take the time to review this resource.
Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday)
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Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday)

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Tuesday 25th February is Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday)! This is a power point resource all about Mardi Gras that includes accompanying activities that can be done afterwards. It is designed as a French lesson, but can easily be used as a whole school assembly, especially in a French -teaching primary school. There are some links to be made with RE and Lent, so it will work especially well in a CE/Catholic primary school teaching French. It is suitable for KS2 or perhaps just lower Key Stage 3. Just something a bit different as there are already many resources out there on the subject of Easter, but very few on Mardi Gras, which is increasing in popularity in the UK as Fat Tuesday. The lesson commences with the children analysing 2 photos showing Mardi Gras (carnival) scenes. (A means of activating critical thinking skills) before introducing the lesson as one about Mardi Gras, how it is celebrated and some key vocabulary. The ppt links to a You Tube clip of a parade in Montreal (providing opportunities to discuss French culture around the world). It introduces some key vocabulary, (and can be used as an opportunity to revise colours, days of the week and dates, as they come up, naturally). In terms of the activities: There are 2 word searches using the key vocabulary. One easier, one harder. In terms of how to deliver the activities, you could try giving the children a print-out of the ‘reading’ slide and asking them to provide a written translation, or alternatively, this can be deciphered as a whole class exercise (I like the passage, as there are some near-cognate words that are not given in the vocabulary - children have to work out they mean based on how they look, sound or are spelled.) As a creative task, children can design a Mardi Gras mask, and several templates are given. The ppt slides can be printed in A3 when there are 2 per page. To make a larger art/DT project, child I have seen examples of Mardi Gras displays on the internet, where, having created the masks, the children’s photographs are taken and printed A3 size and the masks stuck over the top of the child’s face on the notice board - looks amazing. In my school, I haven’t gone that far, but the children were occupied for a whole wet-play, making gold, green and purple paper chains, which I decorated around a notice board, using my ppt slides as information for the mid-section. Sorry, there are no word search answers for the 2nd word search, but you could retain a child’s once they have solved - also, using the word ‘or’ in the word search has resulted in there being several possible answers - I didn’t change it - it’s probably something else of interest that will enable the word to stick in their minds. Hope you enjoy. Please do feel free to leave a review. *Please note: Selling resources on TES has enabled me to donate £150 to date to our partner school in Sierra Leone. A percentage of author proceeds from this resource will be donated to our partner school. *
Metric Conversion Word Problems (Weight)
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Metric Conversion Word Problems (Weight)

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Resource developed for teaching children to convert between g and kg in context based problems. This resource includes a teaching presentation with guided examples and differentiated activities with answers - the activities can be used with different ability groups or over the course of several lessons for progression. There are four sets of ‘what weighs more …’ comparison questions allowing for two days of activities moving to the next level up over the course of both days or for four-way differentiation. The tasks are presented as word problems. The answers are included as slides on the presentation so children can mark their own work. The presentation allows for: Re-visiting the metric units of measurement for weight (mass) grams and kilograms (and milligrams/tons in relation to these) Encouraging children to use knowledge of halves/doubles and patterns etc. to convert mentally between grams and kilograms using knowledge the 1000g = 1kg. Explaining how to use place value (grids) for more complex calculations by going forwards or backwards three places to convert between g and kg or kg and g. The problems are designed to include more complex use of number, as well as conversions as the level of challenge increases. Includes a print-friendly Word version of all activities. For neatness of presentation, ask children to cut and stick each box as they go, showing their workings out beneath. Ideal for use in Year 5 or year 6. I would be grateful if you could leave a review once you have used this resource in class. If you like this, you may also like: imperial to metric conversions https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/imperial-measurements-11869571 Updated: Nov 2019
Imperial Measurements
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Imperial Measurements

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An introduction to imperial measurements This resource gives a comprehensive overview of what imperial measurements are This is ideal to precede written work on converting between measures Includes printables for practical activities Children familarise themselves with concrete examples of imperial to metric conversions. The practical activities could be run as one lesson as a brief carousel, a whole afternoon set of activities, or a series of lessons in a unit on measure, focusing each day on a different measure (Length, weight/mass, volume). For the practical activity, teachers will need access to standard measuring equipment, however, this resource could be used for input alone - children would gain a secure understanding of what imperial means in relation to metric. Slides can also be printed directly from the ppt (full page slides) as posters for your working wall - there is a useful one on how prefixes can help you identify one metric measure in relation to another - milli- centi- deci- etc. If you like this resource, you may also like https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/metric-conversion-problems-weight-11881646 Metric conversions I would be grateful if you could leave a review for this resource, after you have used it in class.
Changing States of Matter Year 4 (Make Butter)
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Changing States of Matter Year 4 (Make Butter)

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Year 4 - Changing States of Matter Practical lesson - used as a hook following Christmas start of new topic - link to food waste - ways to preserve. This is a whole lesson where children make butter by shaking double cream in jars until it first becomes whipped cream and then butter. I prepared it to use in the first week back as a lesson to engage before moving on to solids, liquids and gases. It is an easy and fun practical lesson. This resource comes with a lesson plan, a learning objective table/slip where children are encouraged to link their task to the forthcoming learning by answering two questions about how the liquid cream was different from the solid butter, and a power point presentation - my first slides relate to food waste at Christmas, but this could be easily edited to link to food waste more generally. You will need to provide: several tubs of double cream, jars or lidded plastic tubs to use as shakers, salt, spoons, crackers. I hope you enjoy using this resource and if you could take the time to feed back, I would be grateful.
(Easy) Reading Comprehension French En Ville (J'aime)
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(Easy) Reading Comprehension French En Ville (J'aime)

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One reading sheet Scenario: French teenagers talking about what they like doing in their hometown of Lille. The vocabulary has been deliberately chosen so that children can work out the meaning of the small paragraphs in the speech bubbles even if they have not been taught the vocabulary. This would be good for pair work - to try and figure out what is being said, for learners prior to it being read through and explained by the teacher. The second worksheet is a set of simple questions so it can be completed in a more traditional way.
Coordinates in four quadrants (Desert island map)
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Coordinates in four quadrants (Desert island map)

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This is a lesson (teaching presentation and activity) for teaching coordinates in all four quadrants. A knowledge of coordinates in the first quadrant is assumed alongside a basic knowledge of the principles of negative numbers. The resource is survival themed (as it was delivered as part of a survival learning journey) but it could be used in any maths lesson to teach coordinates in all 4 quadrants - the theme just makes it a little more engaging. It is equally easily adaptable as a pirate treasure map activity. Children imagine themselves on a desert island. They want to create a map for their fellow castaways (or pirates) indicating where the fresh water is, the firewood etc. they must create their own desert islands, plot co-ordinates for all the key features and then state what the coordinates are in a key. Children will love the creative element of this - the maps could be decorated and improved further in pm sessions - this is the type of challenge/activity that they do again at home for the fun of it. It has been deliberately left for the children to decide what their island looks like, and what is important to plot, so that they have full ownership of the ideas. There are teaching slides on how to read and plot co-ordinates in the 4 quadrants and the activity instructions are carefully scaffolded (Children will make mistakes if asked to draw their own axes in their maths books without a clear explanation about how to do so - we discovered the hard way!) There is also a printable grid for LA pupils, who will still be able to create their own island, and plot their own features. Tip: print a few extras, so if anyone does struggle to draw the axis in their books, and needs to re-start, this could be glued in over the top. I created this resource to be used as a survival themed project over a week in maths, at the end of term - there is an accompanying resource set on reading shipping maps and timetables, and creating a look-out rota/timetable. I hope you enjoy delivering this lesson. I would be grateful if you could leave a review with a comment, once you have used it in class.
Assembly: Single Use Plastics
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Assembly: Single Use Plastics

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This assembly looks at the issue of single use plastic. Children are asked initially to use words to describe an idyllic scene, which they later find out is cropped, and the image reveals a litter-strewn beach. The slides talk through the origins of plastic and explore some of the benefits of plastic, so children can understand how we have arrived at this situation. The assembly goes on to look at the drawbacks -in simple terms, not too hard-hitting or upsetting. The final part of this assembly encourages children to think about what they can do to address the situation. There are slides encouraging recycling, not using in the first place, and participation in litter picks. The assembly ends with a prayer, but a good alternative would also be a silent promise - one thing the children will do in the next week to help the situation. There are also external links to two clips that could be used in the assembly - one a classroom clip about different types of plastic and another You Tube clip that’s quite a nice opportunity to ask children what unsustainable choices the man is making, and what the drawbacks for him of each of his choices are. I hope you enjoy using this resource. It is such an important issue and I’m very pleased it is becoming increasingly topical. I would be grateful if you would leave a review, once you have used the assembly.