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Resources for KS3, 4 and 5 History and KS5 Politics (Edexcel and AQA). I have been a teacher for 10 years, including planning and resourcing schemes of work for my department as HoD. I have been consistently graded as "Outstanding" and all my resources have been tried and tested in a variety of classrooms: comprehensive, academy and grammar. I strive always to ensure my lessons are well-differentiated for a mixed ability classroom.

Resources for KS3, 4 and 5 History and KS5 Politics (Edexcel and AQA). I have been a teacher for 10 years, including planning and resourcing schemes of work for my department as HoD. I have been consistently graded as "Outstanding" and all my resources have been tried and tested in a variety of classrooms: comprehensive, academy and grammar. I strive always to ensure my lessons are well-differentiated for a mixed ability classroom.
Black British History: Civil Rights, The Bristol Boycott and the Montgomery Boycott
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Black British History: Civil Rights, The Bristol Boycott and the Montgomery Boycott

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KS3 lesson comparing aspects of British and American Civil Rights Movements: similarities and differences between the Bristol Bus Boycott and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, leading to an essay judging the role of leaders in the success of each movement. Resources include accounts of both boycotts for student comparison and advice and sentence starters for essay provided.
KS3 - Years 7 or 8 - Diversity and black people's experience in Tudor England
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KS3 - Years 7 or 8 - Diversity and black people's experience in Tudor England

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Draws on recent work by historians to challenge assumptions about the nature of Tudor society and culture. Students study primary sources (differentiated written and images), including the famous John Blanke and supporting and countering the idea of a well-integrated society, to make inferences about integration of black Tudors and test interpretations from different historians. Aim: to analyse evidence and evaluate how well integrated black people were in Tudor England Request! Quite a few people have now purchased this lesson and I would be enormously grateful if you could find the time to give me some feedback on it - did it work well for you? Are there any adaptations that you would suggest I make? If you can find the time to leave a short review, I’d really appreciate it! Many thanks indeed.
KS3, Year 7, Migration overview: Who came to Britain and when?
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KS3, Year 7, Migration overview: Who came to Britain and when?

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An introductory lesson to a SoW on migration over time, which works as a stand-alone. Students are given a range of primary sources and asked to match to the correct migration. They create their own timeline (and can even record on map of the globe from where each group originated) and are asked to analyse different reasons for migration. Aims: to identify different groups who have moved to Britain, to be able to place these in CHRONOLOGICAL order, to begin to be able to explain why different people have moved to Britain An excellent lesson for connecting students’ personal heritage to their secondary school history. There are cross-curricular links to geography and it also introduces them to different periods in history and migratory groups.
Interpreting Richard I and the Crusades - Richard "the Lionheart"?
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Interpreting Richard I and the Crusades - Richard "the Lionheart"?

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Part of SOW on Crusades/ Frankish invasions and interpretations, inspired by Christine Counsell’s work on interpretations skills (“Uncovering the jewel of the KS3”, https://www.history.org.uk/secondary/categories/489/module/8723/secondary-workshop-resources-ha-conference-2014/9612/interpretations-of-history-uncovering-the-jewel-o) Designed to be completed online/ during lockdown, this lesson introduces students to the process of deconstructing an interpretation based on 1. what it is saying, 2. what aspects are factual, imagined or points of view and 3 what is the relationship between the interpretation and the available evidence. Students are asked to analyse an interpretation of Richard I to work out what it is saying about him and to compare the interpretation to available evidence. It does ask that they evaluate the accuracy of the interpretation and to redesign it, as part of a wider look at how and why interpretations are constructed - leading them in future lessons towards making some suggestions about why Richard might have been interpreted like this in the Victorian period. It has been designed for a class of students of high ability.
Pirates, privateers and plantations (KS4 GCSE, AQA 9-1 Migration)
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Pirates, privateers and plantations (KS4 GCSE, AQA 9-1 Migration)

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Pirates, privateers and explorers are examined and linked to key factors on the course: economic resources, religion and individual role (gold, glory and God). Main activity links the development of piracy to colonisation and the experiences of African groups. Leads to answering exam question on significance, with teacher guidance. This is a very well differentiated cut and stick activity (you can choose which version suits your class). At a basic level, it helps to embed their chronological understanding of a course with a very long timeline, but higher ability students are challenged to develop their understanding of a complex web of causation by identifying how decisions and motivations on both sides led to colonisation. AIM: To analyse the motivations of explorers, privateers and pirates; To describe the short and long term impact of the voyages of discovery
KS3 - Years 7 or 8 - Diversity and European immigrants' experience in Tudor England
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KS3 - Years 7 or 8 - Diversity and European immigrants' experience in Tudor England

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A follow-up to lesson evaluating integration of black people in Tudor England. Students look at evidence of how well-integrated different groups of European migrants, including Huguenots and Walloons. They are challenged to re-write a Wikipedia entry on integration in Tudor period as a means of demonstrating their learning and final evaluation. Aim: to analyse evidence, to develop a substantiated hypothesis on integration of different groups in Tudor England
Migration - what was the impact of the slave trade on Britain? (KS4, GSCE, AQA)
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Migration - what was the impact of the slave trade on Britain? (KS4, GSCE, AQA)

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Students practice analysing and evaluating sources towards the 8 mark source question. Using a “factors circle” (summarising the themes of the course), they explain their final analysis. For each source contextual knowledge is provided to expand their learning and practice including it in their answers! Aim: to use contextual knowledge to analyse sources and evaluate how useful they are in explaining impact of slave trade on Britain
Success of Civil Rights Movement in USA 1960s through sources (tone & emphasis) - AS/ A Level, AQA
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Success of Civil Rights Movement in USA 1960s through sources (tone & emphasis) - AS/ A Level, AQA

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Lesson targeting students’ difficulties with analysing tone and emphasis for source questions, using content on the Civil Rights Movement in America (Martin Luther King, Stokely Carmichael). Lesson was rated outstanding and received excellent feedback from student voice! Students analyse 2 speeches by CRM leaders in the 1960s. Starter activity is designed to emphasise the importance of tone: the 2 men are talking about the same thing but there is a BIG contrast in TONE (source material provided). Students view short clip from The Apprentice to practice analysing and evaluating tone. (Clip still works!) In small groups, students use worksheet with structured questions to move from describing tone (a list of adjectives provided to help) through to analysing and then evaluating it. Allows students to work at most appropriate level and benefit from understanding of others. Followed by class discussion of findings. Plenary: students view exemplar analysis and evaluation of one of the speeches and must explain what makes it such a good answer! NB As this was an observation lesson, there is extensive explanation and justification of activities in the notes section of the slides.
Hitler's rise to power THE BOARD GAME - revision
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Hitler's rise to power THE BOARD GAME - revision

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An engaging way to get students to review the events that contributed to Hitler becoming Fuhrer/establishing dictatorship in Germany, but also encourages students to consider what key powers were won at each point and to evaluate the most important cause. Essay question is AQA GCSE 9-1, but could be easily adapted for an alternate exam board. You can print out the board game onto A3 for groups of four students to play (I have 6 or 7 laminated and they can be pulled out when we get bored of other types of revision). It is essentially a snakes and ladders game, so you just need a few sets of dice (1 die per board) and some sort of counters (pieces of paper with students initials on them??). I have found that my students get quite competitive and often ask to play again. The only proviso is that I sometimes have to introduce a rule that your go is invalid if you don’t read out the history on the square you land on! Could also be used as a family activity during Covid lockdown?
Collapse of Communism in USSR, Cold War GCSE
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Collapse of Communism in USSR, Cold War GCSE

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Lesson looks at events from independence movements in Baltic/ Eastern Europe and coup against Gorbachev to Yeltsin in power & declaration of end of USSR. Students are given engaging evidence to sort into chronological order and are then asked to analyse to identify key causes of communism’s collapse in the USSR. Final task is a Diamond 9 evaluation of the importance of these causes (with optional help provided in working out what the relevant causes are!) All resources are differentiated for higher and lower ability classes and suitable for use w all exam boards.
KS3 - Year 7 - How did William's control change England?
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KS3 - Year 7 - How did William's control change England?

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Students are asked to put themselves in the role of William the Conqueror and, working in groups, review his problems and a multiple choice range of options on how to solve them. They seek to gain points for being a “conqueror” vs. a “weak king” (in the mould of Edward the Confessor). Learning is then consolidated with a final activity evaluating change. Aim: to describe the ways in which William’s decisions changed England and begin to evaluate which had the biggest impact
Marking/ Assesssment/ exam feedback - AQA 9-1 GCSE 2019: Unit 2, Section A - ACCURATE
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Marking/ Assesssment/ exam feedback - AQA 9-1 GCSE 2019: Unit 2, Section A - ACCURATE

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AQA 9-1 GCSE for 2019. A COMBINED assessment and feedback sheet that can be used to mark each question on this section ofthe exam. They saved our department HUGE amounts of time!! (it is literally a box-ticking exercise…) Assessment and feedback are made easy as each assessment level for each question is described in plain English for the teacher and student. You simply tick what the student has achieved - s/he can see at a glance what needs to be done next time to improve the grade. These descriptions were developed in association with the curriculum leader at AQA, and have been checked for accuracy, so you can feel confident that your colleagues and students are assessing themselves in line with exam board standards. They are up to date with the small changes to questions for 2019 and beyond. The mark sheets can be used to assess individual practice questions or an entire practice paper. They have been sized to print out on A4 paper. The spreadsheet will also calculate the student’s overall percentage and grade for you (you are welcome to adapt grade boundaries in the “Settings” tab). The file also contains detailed instructions for how to use the spreadsheet to generate multiple marksheets (so that, for example, you can have an electronic record of each student’s achievement on their mock), meaning you can be confident that even the most computer-illiterate can use.
GCSE (AQA) How significant was the Berlin Blockade?
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GCSE (AQA) How significant was the Berlin Blockade?

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Lesson designed to develop skills in answering an importance/ significance question, reviewing the consequences and guiding through a 16 mark question (Unit 1, Section B). Differentiated ISM is designed to embed learning and demonstrate how image and humour can aid revision (and it’s a bit of fun). Detailed planning sheet and sentence starters support students to complete task.
Civil rights - groups in USA - AS/ A2 revision/ high level GCSE
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Civil rights - groups in USA - AS/ A2 revision/ high level GCSE

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Students analyse the aims tactics, supporters and achievements of key groups working for the civil rights of black Americans in the early 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. Works as both a teaching and revision lesson. Differentiated group task builds to an evaluation of most successful group - according to what criteria?!
Crusades or Invasions? Interpreting the "Crusades", KS3, Year 7
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Crusades or Invasions? Interpreting the "Crusades", KS3, Year 7

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Part of SOW on Crusades/ Frankish invasions and interpretations, inspired by Christine Counsell’s work on interpretations skills (“Uncovering the jewel of the KS3”, https://www.history.org.uk/secondary/categories/489/module/8723/secondary-workshop-resources-ha-conference-2014/9612/interpretations-of-history-uncovering-the-jewel-o) Designed to be completed online/ during lockdown, this lesson introduces students to the idea that accounts of history are interpretations - we choose what is and is not included in them. Students are asked to analyse two interpretations (paintings) suggesting quite different things about the conflict. Each painting was completed in a different time and for a different purpose and they return to these images later in the SoW. They are then asked to compare the accounts of events as presented in modern textbooks - Western and Arabic - noting which events are included and emphasised and how they are described. The final homework task is to construct their own account of events. (This last task could be adapted to include explicit judgements on significance, but as the focus of this SoW is on interpretations, I felt we didn’t need to add further complication! It is also something we discussed in feedback sessions - how did you decide what to include and what to leave out?) Note that the resources provided to help them to construct their accounts ARE biased towards the Western interpretation - something that can also be discussed in feedback (did they notice?). If you can find a more balanced or English-language accounts presenting a more Arabic interpretation that is manageable for Year 7s, please let me know! The lesson is preceded by two looking at how the Islamic Empire developed and whether it was a Golden Age. It has been designed for a class of students of high ability.
Marking/ assessment/ exam feedback - AQA 9-1 GCSE 2019: Unit 1, Section B - ACCURATE
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Marking/ assessment/ exam feedback - AQA 9-1 GCSE 2019: Unit 1, Section B - ACCURATE

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AQA 9-1 GCSE for 2019. A COMBINED assessment and feedback sheet that can be used to mark each question on this section ofthe exam. They saved our department HUGE amounts of time!! (it is literally a box-ticking exercise…) Assessment and feedback are made easy as each assessment level for each question is described in plain English for the teacher and student. You simply tick what the student has achieved - s/he can see at a glance what needs to be done next time to improve the grade. These descriptions were developed in association with the curriculum leader at AQA, and have been checked for accuracy, so you can feel confident that your colleagues and students are assessing themselves in line with exam board standards. They are up to date with the small changes to questions for 2019 and beyond. The mark sheets can be used to assess individual practice questions or an entire practice paper. They have been sized to print out on A4 paper. The spreadsheet will also calculate the student’s overall percentage and grade for you (you are welcome to adapt grade boundaries in the “Settings” tab). The file also contains detailed instructions for how to use the spreadsheet to generate multiple marksheets (so that, for example, you can have an electronic record of each student’s achievement on their mock), meaning you can be confident that even the most computer-illiterate can use.
Marking/ Assessment/ exam feedback: AQA 9-1 GCSE 2019: Unit 2 Section B - ACCURATE
Otter2010Otter2010

Marking/ Assessment/ exam feedback: AQA 9-1 GCSE 2019: Unit 2 Section B - ACCURATE

(0)
AQA 9-1 GCSE for 2019. A COMBINED assessment and feedback sheet that can be used to mark each question on this section ofthe exam. They saved our department HUGE amounts of time!! (it is literally a box-ticking exercise…) Assessment and feedback are made easy as each assessment level for each question is described in plain English for the teacher and student. You simply tick what the student has achieved - s/he can see at a glance what needs to be done next time to improve the grade. These descriptions were developed in association with the curriculum leader at AQA, and have been checked for accuracy, so you can feel confident that your colleagues and students are assessing themselves in line with exam board standards. They are up to date with the small changes to questions for 2019 and beyond. The mark sheets can be used to assess individual practice questions or an entire practice paper. They have been sized to print out on A4 paper. The spreadsheet will also calculate the student’s overall percentage and grade for you (you are welcome to adapt grade boundaries in the “Settings” tab). The file also contains detailed instructions for how to use the spreadsheet to generate multiple marksheets (so that, for example, you can have an electronic record of each student’s achievement on their mock), meaning you can be confident that even the most computer-illiterate can use.