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Mr Morton Science

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Full time science teacher, teaching science in the UK for 8 years at many schools and universities. Currently teaching Chemistry in Qatar.

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Full time science teacher, teaching science in the UK for 8 years at many schools and universities. Currently teaching Chemistry in Qatar.
Simplified Periodic Table
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Simplified Periodic Table

(19)
I can never seem to find the right periodic table for my students so have made one ideal for KS3/4. Relative atomic mass is only measured to 1d.p. for elements such as Chlorine. Lanthinoids and Actinoides are ignored. Elements are not given capital letters. UK spelling. Relative atomic mass is shown above the chemical symbol. Includes livermorium and flerovium, moscovium etc. Colour coded groups. Groups 1-8 labelled.
Igneous Rocks 2
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Igneous Rocks 2

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Learning Objectives Investigate how speed of cooling affects the crystal size of minerals. Link the properties of igneous rocks with where they cooled. Use particle diagrams to explain the difference between intrusive and extrusive Settler: Revision of intrusive and extrusive from previous lesson. Starter: Pupil write their own hypothesis for the practical – discuss what makes a good hypothesis. Fter pupils have done theirs they can asses themselves based on the WAGOLL in the ppt. Demonstration: Practical:/ Main 1: Pupils carry out the salol/lead iodide or stearic acid cooling practical. Main 2: Pupils write an analysis for this experiment, using the mark scheme. Pupils can then peer assess using the markscheme and the WAGOLL. AFL: Ask pupils at the end how giants causeway was made and importantly where? Photographs in ppt.
Line of Best Fit
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Line of Best Fit

(1)
Teach pupils how to draw the different lines of best fit using this simple worksheet.
Igneous Rocks 1
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Igneous Rocks 1

(0)
Learning Objectives Be able to name some igneous rocks Be able to describe how igneous rocks are formed? Explain the difference between intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks. Settler: Starter: Show pupils some igneous rocks, stress which ones they should be able to name later as examples. From the pictures pupils should identify some trends eg crystals and colour. The images can be printed and laminated to do this exercise independently. Demonstration: Practical/ Main 1: Pupils carry out analysis of the igneous rock samples, using naked eye, magnifying glasses/camera phones, porosity test and acid test. Main 2: Pupils to learn the difference between intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks using ppt. AFL: Questions from page 91 SPLAT Homework Read the geology.com article about igneous rocks and how they are formed.
Respiratory system worksheet pack
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Respiratory system worksheet pack

(12)
A series of worksheets used for teaching respiration. Including labelling the diagram ( I give the pupils page numbers in our dictionaries and they have to figure out the rest themselves). Gap fill exercises and card sorts. Observation notes for a pluck dissection. Lots of challenging resources and pupil led activities designed for an observation lesson.
KS3 Photosynthesis Resources
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KS3 Photosynthesis Resources

(9)
Includes: Gold star questions for stretching able students to apply their learning. Plant cell models homework. Keyword word search and synthesis tasks.
KS3 Science Particles Year 7 - 10 lessons!
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KS3 Science Particles Year 7 - 10 lessons!

(0)
A set of 10 lessons for teaching particles to year 6 or 7. All key behaviours explained with lots of practicals. Powerpoints including with key questions. Covers: Particles Particle model Changing state Gases Water Mixtures Filtering and evaporation Chromatography Distillation
Modern Periodic Table & Atomic Structure
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Modern Periodic Table & Atomic Structure

(8)
Includes full lesson with starter, plenary, timings and AFL. Look at the periodic table, subatomic particles, and electronic configuration. Use the PDFs to produce electron configuration whiteboards for immediate feedback from the whole class. Use the simple periodic tables and pupils can look up their own data for quickfire assessments. periodic table, electron shells, energy levels, assessment
Rock Cycle Assessed task
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Rock Cycle Assessed task

(0)
Learning Objectives Be able to describe the rock cycle as continuous process that takes place over millions of years. Relate the rock cycle as a type of recycling Revise the whole rock cycle
Quarrying
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Quarrying

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Learning Objectives ✤ Describe briefly the uses if limestone and how it is quarried. ✤ Consider and evaluate the environmental, social and economic effects of exploiting limestone and producing building materials from it. ✤ Evaluate the developments in using limestone, cement and concrete as building materials, and their advantages and disadvantages over other materials. Settler: Starter: Demonstration: Practical: Main 1: Limestone cycle folder Main 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehBKETtRImk How does cement work? AFL: Homework Take a look at this article: Worlds largest Open pit Mines (Quarrys) To add extra wow factor I found them on google maps for you: • The biggest iron mine • The deepest mine • The deadliest mine Your task after this lesson will be to prepare yourself for a debate on Quarrying - Is it good or bad? The best pupils will research both sides, and this article will give you great perspective. For example Hibbing Minnesota would not exist at all without the local mine as it provides all the jobs and income for the area. There are lots of positive and negative arguments in the text of the article. You may also want to research easier to read websites such as BBC Bitesize.
Volcanoes
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Volcanoes

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Learning Objectives State that volcanoes occur at tectonic plate boundaries. Explain why do people live near volcanoes? Contrast volcanoes predictability with those of earthquakes. Settler: What are volcanoes? Pictures and video Starter: Pupils draw and label main parts of a volcano. Demonstration: Candlewax volcano http://www.rsc.org/Education/Teachers/Resources/jesei/volcano/teachers.pdf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_sYRrpNum8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwVbqveNe6c Practical: Main 1: Where do volcanoes occur? Main 2: AFL: Practice questions in ppt Homework Homework: IN PAIRS Produce a model of a volcano. You can use your imagination, with whatever materials you have to hand. If you want your volcano to react there are lots of videos to show you how. If you are stuck for ideas you can use the if Doha had a volcano model template on the website.
Hazard Symbols
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Hazard Symbols

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All the modern hazard symbols covered by the curriculum gathered into one place. Images should be large enough for printing for displays. Check out my other resources for power points and worksheets related to these hazard symbols. display, safety, practical
Continental Drift Alfred Wegener
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Continental Drift Alfred Wegener

(0)
Learning Objectives Learn who Alfred Wegener was and state the theory of continental drift. Describe the crust as broken into pieces called tectonic plates. Explain that convection currents within the Earth’s mantle driven by heat released by natural radioactive processes because the plates to move at relative speeds of a few centimeters per year. Evaluate the evidence for continental drift and explain why it was not accepted at the time. Settler: Think pair share – Were all scientists successful? Introduce students to the storys of Mendeleevs early life, Alfred Wegeners life and/or Nikolai Tesla. Starter: Demonstration: Plate tectonic demonstration with biscuits and syrup – see video Practical: Main 1: Alfred Wegener Song https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1-cES1Ekto Explain tectonic plates and continental drift Alfred Wegener SciShow Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbU809Cyrao Main 2: Pupils answer What is the Alfred Wegener’s theory of continental drift. And what evidence did he have for it? (4) Alfred Wegener’s theory of continental drift was not accepted by the scientists at the time. Why? (2) AFL: Homework Produce a fake social media page for Alfred Wegener, what sort of things would he be posting about? Some people have already had a go, what would you post about if you were him?
AQA C2 Starter/plenary Quizzes Every Topic
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AQA C2 Starter/plenary Quizzes Every Topic

(0)
For every topic in 2 there is a small (under 5 mins) starter or plenary quiz, includes multiple choice answers to enable all pupils to access the content. Great assessment at the start of a revision lesson or ideal for tuition. Includes:
AQA C2 Progress Self Assessment forms
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AQA C2 Progress Self Assessment forms

(0)
Covers every topic in C2. These google forms are designed to allow you to either print or mail direct to you students and they can self assess what they know against the required specification. When completed either within the email or in an internet browser (works perfectly on mobile devices) the evaluation from the class is sent directly back to you where a breakdown of the responses is built into the form. (responses - summary of responses). **UPDATE** Google form versions can be accessed through the word document. Each form only takes pupils a few minutes to fill out and are much quicker than traditional Red/amber/green self assessments. Ideally complete after the lesson is taught, at the beginning of any revision period and at the end of a revision session.
Energy in the Home
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Energy in the Home

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Explain how heat is lost from the home or how heat enters the home when we don’t want it to. State ways we can reduce heat transfer in the home. Explain how cavity walls and double glazing reduce heat transfer
Weathering
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Weathering

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Learning Objectives To describe the three types of weathering, Biological, physical and chemical. To be able to give examples of all three types of weathering. To link the weathering process to the landscape. Use particle diagrams to explain weathering Settler: Starter: Demonstration/Main 1: Draw diagrams to represent the three types of weathering on the board if you are not confident use the textbook. Pupils need to be able to use particle diagrams - in this case particle means rock pieces of any size. Practical: Show the frozen rock breaking demo as an example of freeze thaw. Main 2: Link to the landscapes of Qatar, erratics etc. AFL: Show photos of different types of weathering and ask pupils to identify them
Earth's Early Atmosphere
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Earth's Early Atmosphere

(1)
Learning Objectives ✤ State the composition of clean, dry air ✤ Explain the changes in the Earth that led to oceans forming. ✤ Relate the Earths early atmosphere with that of Mars or Venus today. ✤ Explain the changes in the Earths atmosphere today.
Boiling Points & melting Points
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Boiling Points & melting Points

(0)
Be able to describe what happens to particles at a melting point for a substance Be able to draw particle diagrams for boiling and melting Be able to draw number lines for states of a substance.