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Tes Research series: volume one
TES_EditorialTES_Editorial

Tes Research series: volume one

(2)
The Tes Research series: volume one - 60 pages of interviews with acclaimed academics - providing you with the information you need to know about: Being a research-informed professional: Dylan William, emeritus professor of educational assessment at UCL Institute of Education, talks about the usefulness of the research that’s out there and how teachers are currently consuming it. How memory works: World-renowned memory researchers Professors Robert and Elizabeth Bjork explain how to match teaching to what we know about how memory works, and why linking learning to a student’s interests and group work is key. Dyslexia: Professor Margaret Snowling, president of St John’s College Oxford, is one of the world’s leading dyslexia researchers. Here, she addresses myths around the condition and warns that education is still missing opportunities to help support students at an earlier stage. Growth Mindset: Carol Dweck, Lewis and Virginia Eaton professor of psychology at Stanford University, is the creator of the highly popular growth mindset theory. Here she embraces the intense scrutiny that the theory has been subjected to and delves headfirst into the questions behind its validity. The use of play in education: Dr Sara Baker is trying to change perceptions of play in the classroom with her work at Cambridge’s Play in Education, Development and Learning (PEDAL) Centre. She conducts research into the use of play in schools and believes that we might have been getting it wrong. How we learn to read: Daniel Willingham, professor of psychology at the University of Virginia and one of the world’s leading experts on research into reading, talks through the three processes children need to get right to become successful readers and why teachers need to overcome the fact that phonics resources tend to be ‘boring’. Autism: Uta Frith is one of the world’s leading experts on autism and emeritus professor of cognitive development at UCL. She began studying autism in 1966 when it was an emerging field of research, and says we’re now a much more autistic-aware society, but that myths and misunderstandings still remain, particularly in schools.
Tes Research series: volume two
TES_EditorialTES_Editorial

Tes Research series: volume two

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The Tes Research series: volume two will provide you with the information you need to know about: Spotting research myths Tackling literacy problems in secondary The role of genetics in education How to judge teacher and school effectiveness Why you’re probably not making the most of your teaching assistants What every teacher needs to know about setting Gender stereotyping in schools – its damaging effects and how to prevent it Understanding race in education
Tes Guide to Your First Year In Teaching
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Tes Guide to Your First Year In Teaching

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The Tes Guide to Your First Year In Teaching is the definitive handbook to your NQT year. It will equip you with all you need to know for your first year on the job, with informative articles planned and written by experienced teachers – just for you! The guide will help you thrive in those exciting first 12 months, with all the answers, research and tips you need to be the best teacher you can be. What’s inside? What to expect in your NQT year and how to deal with common problems – by school leader Mark Roberts A fail safe way to learn 30 names in 5 minutes – by Jo Baker How to make your planning more efficient – by Department head Rebecca Foster Pedagogy – get the right balance between research and your natural style – by research lead Megan Dixon Retrieval practice – why you should think of it as your handbag – by headteacher Clare Sealey The psychology behind good behaviour management – by executive headteacher Jarlath O’Brien What I wish I had known about research and marking – by research lead Mark Enser A brief guide to dealing with parents – by Tes columnist Nancy Gedge How to use your Sendco wisely – by Tes columnist Gemma Corby The art of a good explanation – by head of department Emily Seeber How to use research to help you improve and find answers – by research lead Megan Mansworth
Tes Research series: volume three
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Tes Research series: volume three

(0)
The Tes Research series: volume three will provide you with the information you need to know about: Character: All schools strive to instil or develop ‘character’ in their pupils. Professor Angela Duckworth explores whether character can actually be taught, and if so, just how that might be done in schools. Language development support: Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) impacts – on average – two children in every classroom. Professor Courtenay Norbury explains what we know about DLD and offers advice on how to support children who have a DLD diagnosis. Executive function: Executive functioning issues are weaknesses in a set of important mental skills that are key to learning. When kids struggle with executive skills, it impacts them in school and in everyday life. Professor Lucy Cragg explains how executive function skills underpin learning, and so need to be better understood in schools. Teacher talk: Professor Neil Mercer is emeritus professor of education at the University of Cambridge and director of Oracy Cambridge. He is a leading expert on the role of spoken language in the classroom. He discusses the evidence for, and practical strategies to implement, both teacher and pupil talk. **EAL interventions: ** Victoria Murphy is professor of applied linguistics at the University of Oxford. She is an expert in EAL and bilingualism, and has conducted extensive research into both areas. She explains what the research can tell teachers about the best ways of supporting EAL learners. Limits of research: Professor Steve Higgins was one of the creators of the EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit and is one of the leading education researchers in the UK. He discusses whether we will ever really know exactly what works in education. Direct instruction: Professor Paul Kirschner details what exactly direct instruction is and why the research suggests it is the best approach to teaching