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The Efficient Science Teacher

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Bringing you quality resources to save you time in and out of the classroom.
bioMAGNIFIED (Mercury and DDT) - History of STEM practicals - Card Simulation
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bioMAGNIFIED (Mercury and DDT) - History of STEM practicals - Card Simulation

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Practical 12 in the History in STEM practical series. In practical 12 we take a closer look at the history of biomagnifcation, by taking a trip through history to look at the impact of mercury over the years. With examples from the ancient Rome all the way to modern Japan, it gives the students a good idea of the human impact on the environment through the release of toxins. After that, we turn our attention to more modern times, by playing “bioMAGNIFIED” a card game simulation of bioaccumulation in the ocean food web. All cards are provided, with instructions and include mini and maxi cards, as well as coloured backs to help the students quickly sort the cards at the end of a game. More about the History in STEM practical Series This series is designed to bring quality cross-curricula material to STEM subjects, that help students to explore and discover phenomena normally taught, while getting a glimpse into the history of its development. In addition, a number of the practicals give the students the opportunity to play “Mythbusters”, looking at a number of different methods and having to reason why one or the other was the more likely or useful method. From Ancient Greece to Vikings, China to the Golden age of the Muslim empire and beyond to India, the series takes a look at some of the most important STEM achievements throughout history. There is a plan for 40 of these such practicals in this series, so, if you liked this one, consider looking at some of the others, or check out some of the bundles available. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Comment and Email Generator - Excel
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Comment and Email Generator - Excel

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Easily generate unique comments for each of your students with this straight forward, easy to use excel sheet. Use the comments already loaded or input your own to quick and easily generate report comments that are individualised. See steps below for how to use. Go to Grades Tab and Insert student names and gender (use capital F or M to indicate which pronouns will be used in the comment) Go to Sentences. I have provided you with some examples of what you can use. You can alter what is there, and there is space for your to add more. If you need more sentence ideas, there is plenty available online which you can use as a template. Just google, “Report Comment examples” and you should come up with thousand of options. When inputting the sentences, you should see the key to the right for inputting pronouns or other data. For example, “%name% has shown that while heshe is capable, heshe has work to do to meet expectations.” will replace %name% with the name of the student and “heshe” will change to he or she based on the gender input. Before you begin creating your individualised comments, you should print off the “Sentences” sheet. It will make it easier to see all the options you have available. Now you are ready to create your comments. Go to the input tab and for each section insert a number between 1 and 25. This will insert the corresponding sentence that you created in the Sentences sheet. If you want to mention an assignment, then place the name of the assignment in the assignment column and it will insert it into the comment for you. When you are done, go back to the Grades tab and you should be able to see an overview of the comments for your students. If you prefer a cleaner view, you can go to the “Individual Student View Report Card” and type the number of each student in individually to have a closer look and check that you are happy. The final step is to copy the cells over to a Word document or wherever else you want the writing to go and you are done. If you don’t want to use my comments, there is a little time to be taken in the initial set up, but once you have the sentences in place, comment writing takes a matter of minutes rather than hours. I would even recommend having a separate list of sentence for each year level, however, that is something that you can work on with time. I have also attached an Email generator as a bonus. It has space for up to 15 preset emails that you can set. I have again left some examples, but you can alter them and create your own. When making your own emails, don’t forget to use the key to the right for anything you want replaced.
Ocean Acidification - A Card Game Simulation - Climate Change
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Ocean Acidification - A Card Game Simulation - Climate Change

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Instructions for Teachers The pages are set so that, when printed double sided, they have a back and front, enabling for easy sorting. Before you print the whole deck, test your settings by printing the first two pages of cards, to check alignment. If it doesn’t match, then its likely to do with how the printer flips the page (either long end or short end), so make sure it is on the flipped on the long end. If you don’t want backs, then print every second page. There are two sizes of cards, mini and large, so have a look at both before you print. Contents: 8x Hydrogen Cards, 8x Hydrogen Carbonate Cards, 19x Calcium Cards, 19x Carbonate Cards, 1x Information Card This card game works in 4 rounds. This works best in groups of 4, but can work with less or if necessary, up to 5 players per deck. Each player is role playing as a crab. Round one: The game starts by placing all of the Calcium and Carbonate Ion Cards face down on the table, as well as two hydrogen and two hydrogen carbonate cards. Each person picks up 4 positive ion cards and 4 negative ion cards. The goal is to match Calcium with Carbonate. If you have 4 pairs, your shell grows. 3 pairs means enough minerals have been gathered to repair their shell. 2 pairs means damage cannot be repaired, but doesn’t worsen and 1 pair means the shell gets further damage and cannot be repaired. Record the scores on a tally card. Round two-four: At the end of the first round and each round after, all the cards are returned to the table, face down and an additional two hydrogen and two hydrogen carbonate cards are added, symbolising the acidification of the ocean through the dissolving of more CO2. Same rules for shell repair apply. Person with the most points at the end wins (pairs). Enjoy. The Efficient Science Teacher If you liked this game, don’t forget to check out my other games: The Biology Bandit - A Biology Escape Room Revision Activity - Human Impact - A Biological Card Game - Ecology, Climate Change + Sustainability or if you need some practicals, check out my Bundle of practicals focusing on the History of STEM: Bundle - History of STEM Practicals - Science, Mathematics and History
Alan Turing - Diorama/Cutout - Scientists Through The Ages
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Alan Turing - Diorama/Cutout - Scientists Through The Ages

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A great activity to do on a cover lesson, or as an intro to a new maths topic, this prepared diorama just needs to be cut out and stuck together, to create a 3D picture of the famous Alan Turing, the famous mathematician known for building the machine that ended up breaking the enigma code. This includes both a pre-coloured file, as well as a black and white image that the students can colour themselves, giving you plenty of options to keep the students entertained and informed. Please note: This file ONLY contains Alan Turing. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Build a Microscope - History of STEM practicals - History of Microscopes
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Build a Microscope - History of STEM practicals - History of Microscopes

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Practical 25 in the History in STEM practical series. In this practical the students will be able to build their own microscopes using equipment available in most labs. They will be even able to make their own lenses, using methods that might have been used in the early days of the invention of microscopes. This package includes a printout with an introduction, including a history of microscopes, as well as a printout template which students can use to build their microscopes with. The practical can be done in a 90 minute lesson and the microscope can be used in conjunction with their phones to take images of the slides they observe, adding a modern touch to this old instrument. The practical takes in the history, while also giving students a hands on experiment to explore a concept that is difficult to grasp. They can even take the microscope home with them and all the material is recyclable, making this a good practical for the environmentally conscientious school. This is definitely a practical they won’t forget. More about the History in STEM practical Series This series is designed to bring quality cross-curricula material to STEM subjects, that help students to explore and discover phenomena normally taught, while getting a glimpse into the history of its development. In addition, a number of the practicals give the students the opportunity to play “Mythbusters”, looking at a number of different methods and having to reason why one or the other was the more likely or useful method. From Ancient Greece to Vikings, China to the Golden age of the Muslim empire and beyond to India, the series takes a look at some of the most important STEM achievements throughout history. There is a plan for about 40 of these such practicals in this series, so, if you liked this one, consider looking at some of the others, or check out some of the bundles available. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Mummification Practical - History of STEM practicals - Oh Mummy!
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Mummification Practical - History of STEM practicals - Oh Mummy!

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Practical 22 in the History in STEM practical series. This practical, “Oh Mummy” is a great biology/history cross over, as students test various methods to mummify a piece of apple. Easy to set up, this practical is great for generating discussions in a number of areas of biology, ranging from human anatomy, looking into how food is broken down, or even cultural practices (due to the introduction covering mummification practices of multiple nations), just to name a few. You can even encourage the students to brainstorm on additional theories to test, allowing the students to go through the scientific method. A real all-rounder, interesting practical that the students will remember for years to come. More about the History in STEM practical Series This series is designed to bring quality cross-curricula material to STEM subjects, that help students to explore and discover phenomena normally taught, while getting a glimpse into the history of its development. In addition, a number of the practicals give the students the opportunity to play “Mythbusters”, looking at a number of different methods and having to reason why one or the other was the more likely or useful method. From Ancient Greece to Vikings, China to the Golden age of the Muslim empire and beyond to India, the series takes a look at some of the most important STEM achievements throughout history. There is a plan for 40 of these such practicals in this series, so, if you liked this one, consider looking at some of the others, or check out some of the bundles available. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Katherine Johnson - Diorama/Cutout - Scientists Through The Ages
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Katherine Johnson - Diorama/Cutout - Scientists Through The Ages

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A great activity to do on a cover lesson, or as an intro to a new physics or maths topic, this prepare diorama just needs to be cut out and stuck together, to create a 3D picture of the famous Katherine Johnson, the NASA Mathematician. This includes both a pre-coloured file, as well as a black and white image that the students can colour themselves, giving you plenty of options to keep the students entertained and informed. Please note: This file ONLY contains Katherine Johnson Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Photosynthesis Bingo - Great for Review and Cover Lessons
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Photosynthesis Bingo - Great for Review and Cover Lessons

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Excellent for review lessons, cover lessons or as formative assessment, to see what they remember from previous years. Contains 30 randomised cards, ready to print out for a fun game of vocabulary bingo. Students can work individually, or in pairs to cross out terms as you pull them out of a jar (teacher sheet provided). When a card has a straight line of called out terms, either horizontally, vertically or diagonally, then the participant/s calls out “Bingo”. First participant/s to have an accurate filled out score card with a straight line is the winner. As a follow up, students can take the key vocabulary used in the bingo and write out definitions in their books for later use as a reference guide for upcoming lessons. Comes as a pdf file, ready to print. Liked this one? Check out the others! Copyright © 2022 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Electric Circuits Bingo - Great for Review and Cover Lessons
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Electric Circuits Bingo - Great for Review and Cover Lessons

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Excellent for review lessons, cover lessons or as formative assessement, to see what they remember from previous years. Contains 30 randomised cards, ready to print out for a fun game of vocabulary bingo. Students can work individually, or in pairs to cross out terms as you pull them out of a jar (teacher sheet provided). When a card has a straight line of called out terms, either horizontally, vertically or diagonally, then the participant/s calls out “Bingo”. First participant/s to have an accurate filled out score card with a straight line is the winner. As a follow up, students can take the key vocabulary used in the bingo and write out definitions in their books for later use as a reference guide for upcoming lessons. Comes as a pdf file, ready to print. Liked this one? Check out the others! Copyright © 2022 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Ionic Bonding Bingo - Great for Review and Cover Lessons
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Ionic Bonding Bingo - Great for Review and Cover Lessons

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Excellent for review lessons, cover lessons or as formative assessment, to see what they remember from previous years. Contains 30 randomised cards, ready to print out for a fun game of vocabulary bingo. Students can work individually, or in pairs to cross out terms as you pull them out of a jar (teacher sheet provided). When a card has a straight line of called out terms, either horizontally, vertically or diagonally, then the participant/s calls out “Bingo”. First participant/s to have an accurate filled out score card with a straight line is the winner. As a follow up, students can take the key vocabulary used in the bingo and write out definitions in their books for later use as a reference guide for upcoming lessons. Comes as a pdf file, ready to print. Liked this one? Check out the others! Copyright © 2022 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Alfred Wallace Fact Poster - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File
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Alfred Wallace Fact Poster - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File

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Have your students explore scientists throughout history with this colourful, interesting poster of Alfred Wallace. The file can be printed on paper up to A3 size, without any worries about losing quality of the image. Perfect for decorating the lab and reminding your students of the diverse group of people that gave us the knowledge to get where we are today. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Katherine Johnson Fact Poster - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File
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Katherine Johnson Fact Poster - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File

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Have your students explore scientists throughout history with this colourful, interesting poster of Katherine Johnson, the NASA Mathematician. The file can be printed on paper up to A3 size, without any worries about losing quality of the image. Perfect for decorating the lab and reminding your students of the diverse group of people that gave us the knowledge to get where we are today. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Moped - Writing Practice/Colouring Page Vehicles
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Moped - Writing Practice/Colouring Page Vehicles

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Get students engaged with this colouring in picture/writing practice exercise of vehicles. Each vehicle has it’s name up the top of the page, with space down the bottom giving plenty of room and structure for students to try and write the name out themselves. Once they have done that, they can then go ahead and grab out the coloured pencils and let their imagination run wild. Great for cover lessons. Want more? Check out the rest of the vehicles in the series! Copyright © 2022 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Edited image from https://publicdomainvectors.org/ Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only
Human Impact - A Biological Card Game - Ecology, Climate Change + Sustainability
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Human Impact - A Biological Card Game - Ecology, Climate Change + Sustainability

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A simple card game for groups of four, it is quick to print, quick to set up and easy to run. It is a great tool for creating discussions on the topics of human impact on the environment, food webs, ecology, sustainable living and a jumping point for the students to delve deeper, to begin their own research into their habits and what they can do to make a difference. Simply print the the pages double sided, cut them out and you are ready to go. It is possible to have bigger or smaller groups, as there are seven included location cards, however, for balance of scores at the end, I have had most success with four students. Teacher Instructions The pages are set so that, when printed double sided, they have a back and front, enabling for easy sorting. There are location cards with different habitats, scenario cards which give instructions for the students to add or take tokens away and lifeline cards, which can be used once in a game to protect against the effect of a scenario card. Before you print the whole deck, test your settings by printing the first two pages of cards, to check alignment. If it doesn’t match, then its likely to do with how the printer flips the page (either long end or short end), so make sure it is on the flipped on the long end. If you don’t want backs, then print every second page. There are two sizes of cards, mini and large, so have a look at both before you print. You will need some tokens, but if you can’t find some, having the students keep track of their points on a piece of paper should suffice. At the start of each game, the decks are shuffled and the students each pick 1 lifeline and 1 habitat card at random. Then, they take turns drawing scenario cards and either add or remove points/tokens as instructed. At the end the points are tallied and a winner is determined. They can check the score card for extra reference and discussion points. An extension activity, might be to discuss the cards and what could be added to them. Then, as homework, the students could be set to design 7 more scenario cards to add to the deck. The point is that this game, while fun, should be used as a starting point to jump into a discussion of the impact of human activity on earth. Enjoy. The Efficient Science Teacher
Chemical Reactions - History of STEM practicals - Invisible Ink Practical
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Chemical Reactions - History of STEM practicals - Invisible Ink Practical

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Practical 7 in the History in STEM practical series. In this practical, you will be looking at the illusive history of invisible ink and the chemical reactions behind them. Have a look at the different methods used, beginning in Ancient Greece and continuing through history all the way through to modern times. Test their effectiveness in application, invisibility and ease of development, and decide for yourself, which of the methods you would choose. Finally, take your knowledge and apply it to working out the teachers secret message. Which method did they use? Use observations and clues to make your deductions and then test your hypothesis. More about the History in STEM practical Series This series is designed to bring quality cross-curricula material to STEM subjects, that help students to explore and discover phenomena normally taught, while getting a glimpse into the history of its development. In addition, a number of the practicals give the students the opportunity to play “Mythbusters”, looking at a number of different methods and having to reason why one or the other was the more likely or useful method. From Ancient Greece to Vikings, China to the Golden age of the Muslim empire and beyond to India, the series takes a look at some of the most important STEM achievements throughout history. There is a plan for 40 of these such practicals in this series, so, if you liked this one, consider looking at some of the others, or check out some of the bundles available. Other practicals in the series: Similar Triangles - History of STEM practicals - How Far Is That Boat? Water Alarm Clock - History of STEM practicals - Pressure and Displacement Viking Sunstones - History of STEM practicals - Refraction and Birefringence Pythagoras’ Cup - History of STEM practicals - Siphon Archimedes’ Eureka - History of STEM practicals - Density Measuring the World - History of STEM Practicals - Circumference of Circles
Water Alarm Clock - History of STEM practicals - Pressure and Displacement
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Water Alarm Clock - History of STEM practicals - Pressure and Displacement

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Note: This would be a great followup practical after completing your Pythagoras Cup. Practical 5 in the History in STEM practical series. In this practical we are looking at the humble beginnings of the alarm clock. This version is based on a design believed to be used by Plato, to make sure he got up on time. It teaches a number of concepts, such as siphons, as well as displacement and air pressure. It takes the principle of the cup and applies it in a new way. When the water siphons into the vessel, it displaces the air out, forcing it through a whistle, causing it to sound. You can tweak the practical to have the time it takes for the alarm to go off, to suit whatever purpose you like. This is probably more than a single lesson practical, but might be a good collaborative project. Bring the Arts department in to get some cool decorations for the clock. Get the history team to talk about Plato and the philosophers of ancient Greece and turn this practical into a real cross curriculum event. More about the History in STEM practical Series This series is designed to bring quality cross-curricula material to STEM subjects, that help students to explore and discover phenomena normally taught, while getting a glimpse into the history of its development. In addition, a number of the practicals give the students the opportunity to play “Mythbusters”, looking at a number of different methods and having to reason why one or the other was the more likely or useful method. From Ancient Greece to Vikings, China to the Golden age of the Muslim empire and beyond to India, the series takes a look at some of the most important STEM achievements throughout history. There is a plan for 40 of these such practicals in this series, so, if you liked this one, consider looking at some of the others, or check out some of the bundles available. Other practicals in the series: Similar Triangles - History of STEM practicals - How Far Is That Boat? Water Alarm Clock - History of STEM practicals - Pressure and Displacement Viking Sunstones - History of STEM practicals - Refraction and Birefringence Pythagoras’ Cup - History of STEM practicals - Siphon Archimedes’ Eureka - History of STEM practicals - Density Measuring the World - History of STEM Practicals - Circumference of Circles
Budget Tracker - Head of Department
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Budget Tracker - Head of Department

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Easily keep track of faculty spending with this easy to use, straight forward budget tracker. Produces graphs, reports and tables giving a clear view of where your budget is going and how much is left. Step 1 Go to the “Overall” sheet and in the total budget cell, input your allocated budget. Step 2 As orders come in, click on the appropriate subject tab, and list the resource, where it is from, who ordered it, the cost, how many are required and if there are any shipping costs. The results will update on the “Overall” both in the table, and graphically, giving you a visual of exactly where the money is being spent. Furthermore a short report is generated, that can be copied and pasted into an email, should you need to notify someone of the progress with the budget. Step 3 It should be noted, that although this excel sheet has been set up for a Head of Science Position, it could be easily adapted to suit other Faculties by changing the name of the sheets and the labels on the graph. To alter the report, simply click on the cell, and in the formula, wherever a faculty is listed, rewrite it with the appropriate replacement. pw to unlock cells is “schoolsoutforsummer”
Marie Curie - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File
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Marie Curie - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File

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Have your students explore scientists throughout history with this colourful, interesting poster of Marie Curie. The file can be printed on paper up to A3 size, without any worries about losing quality of the image. Perfect for decorating the lab and reminding your students of the diverse group of people that gave us the knowledge to get where we are today. Want the set? Get the bundle and save! The 12 figures in the bundle include: Physics: Albert Einstein - Famous for his theories on relatively. Marie Curie - A pioneer in radioactive material research Nikola Tesla - A driving force in the field of electronics. Chemistry: Mendeleev - Responsible for the periodic table we recognise today. Cai Lun - Attributed with creating the first true paper in China. Jabir Ibn-Hayyan - The legendary figure, known as the “Father of Chemistry”, reportedly responsible for producing the “aqua regis”. Biology Charles Darwin - The famous author of “Origins of Species”. Alfred Wallace - Co-creator of the theory of Evolution. Jane Goodall - A famous scientist who, working with chimpanzees, gained a whole knew understanding of interaction between organisms. Mathematics Pythagoras - Famous for his theory on Triangles, as well as not liking beans. Mary Jackson - The first female African-American engineer for NASA, as seen in the recent movie, “Hidden Figures”. Brahmagupta - An Indian mathematician, credited with creating the rules governing the use of “0” as a number in calculations. If you like this resource, keep an eye out for bundle 2 coming out very soon with another 12 scientists. Like something a little more interactive? Get these 12 scientists as cut and build dioramas as a quick to prepare cover lesson or for when you have a difficult afternoon lesson. Can’t get enough of the History of STEM? Check out my bundle of science experiments replicating famous experiments throughout history. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Alfred Wallace - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File
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Alfred Wallace - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File

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Have your students explore scientists throughout history with this colourful, interesting poster of Alfred Wallace. The file can be printed on paper up to A3 size, without any worries about losing quality of the image. Perfect for decorating the lab and reminding your students of the diverse group of people that gave us the knowledge to get where we are today. Want the set? Get the bundle and save! The 12 figures in the bundle include: Physics: Albert Einstein - Famous for his theories on relatively. Marie Curie - A pioneer in radioactive material research Nikola Tesla - A driving force in the field of electronics. Chemistry: Mendeleev - Responsible for the periodic table we recognise today. Cai Lun - Attributed with creating the first true paper in China. Jabir Ibn-Hayyan - The legendary figure, known as the “Father of Chemistry”, reportedly responsible for producing the “aqua regis”. Biology Charles Darwin - The famous author of “Origins of Species”. Alfred Wallace - Co-creator of the theory of Evolution. Jane Goodall - A famous scientist who, working with chimpanzees, gained a whole knew understanding of interaction between organisms. Mathematics Pythagoras - Famous for his theory on Triangles, as well as not liking beans. Mary Jackson - The first female African-American engineer for NASA, as seen in the recent movie, “Hidden Figures”. Brahmagupta - An Indian mathematician, credited with creating the rules governing the use of “0” as a number in calculations. If you like this resource, keep an eye out for bundle 2 coming out very soon with another 12 scientists. Like something a little more interactive? Get these 12 scientists as cut and build dioramas as a quick to prepare cover lesson or for when you have a difficult afternoon lesson. Can’t get enough of the History of STEM? Check out my bundle of science experiments replicating famous experiments throughout history. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Charles Darwin - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File
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Charles Darwin - Scientists Throughout The Ages A3 Poster File

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Have your students explore scientists throughout history with this colourful, interesting poster of Charles Darwin. The file can be printed on paper up to A3 size, without any worries about losing quality of the image. Perfect for decorating the lab and reminding your students of the diverse group of people that gave us the knowledge to get where we are today. Want the set? Get the bundle and save! The 12 figures in the bundle include: Physics: Albert Einstein - Famous for his theories on relatively. Marie Curie - A pioneer in radioactive material research Nikola Tesla - A driving force in the field of electronics. Chemistry: Mendeleev - Responsible for the periodic table we recognise today. Cai Lun - Attributed with creating the first true paper in China. Jabir Ibn-Hayyan - The legendary figure, known as the “Father of Chemistry”, reportedly responsible for producing the “aqua regis”. Biology Charles Darwin - The famous author of “Origins of Species”. Alfred Wallace - Co-creator of the theory of Evolution. Jane Goodall - A famous scientist who, working with chimpanzees, gained a whole knew understanding of interaction between organisms. Mathematics Pythagoras - Famous for his theory on Triangles, as well as not liking beans. Mary Jackson - The first female African-American engineer for NASA, as seen in the recent movie, “Hidden Figures”. Brahmagupta - An Indian mathematician, credited with creating the rules governing the use of “0” as a number in calculations. If you like this resource, keep an eye out for bundle 2 coming out very soon with another 12 scientists. Like something a little more interactive? Get these 12 scientists as cut and build dioramas as a quick to prepare cover lesson or for when you have a difficult afternoon lesson. Can’t get enough of the History of STEM? Check out my bundle of science experiments replicating famous experiments throughout history. Copyright © 2020 The Efficient Science Teacher All rights reserved by author. Permission to copy for single classroom use only. Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.