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The Teachers Squire

Do you sometimes feel every term is an uphill battle, juggling 100 things at once? Want a sustainable work life balance without compromising on the quality of your teaching? Let your squire share your workload with classroom ready resources made for busy teachers. #38hrworkingweek #workingtogether

Do you sometimes feel every term is an uphill battle, juggling 100 things at once? Want a sustainable work life balance without compromising on the quality of your teaching? Let your squire share your workload with classroom ready resources made for busy teachers. #38hrworkingweek #workingtogether
Identifying Primary and Secondary Sources: For Beginners
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Identifying Primary and Secondary Sources: For Beginners

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Overview: This resource for younger aged students (approximately ages 10-13 years) provides a solid foundation for studying history by engaging students with a variety of source material which outlines why we study history, what historians do on a day to day basis and how to identify primary and secondary source material. About the resource: This resource includes over thirty pages of content including: Detailed lesson plans that follow the GANAG instructional model with embedded HITS & Historical Thinking concepts, Additional ‘teacher note pages’ which outline the pedagogical choices made for each activity, APK (introductory activities) that can be projected onto a whiteboard or printed, A 3 page detailed worksheet that explains the reason we study history, what historians do on a day to day basis and which examines how to identify primary and secondary source material (with examples), this includes clear definitions and embedded activities that gradually increase in complexity, A brainstorm activity in printable or projected format which will allow you to quickly identify student knowledge, including any misconceptions they may hold about sources, A game which asks students to identify a variety of sources as either primary or secondary: 30 task cards included with detailed instructions on how to play the game, also includes modified versions of the game, A formative writing task to be given to students after the two lessons which assesses their understanding of the content, Information sheets for Historical Thinking concepts, HITS & GANAG. On Curriculum: Each resource I design directly links to a variety of curriculum contexts including: Common Core standards (USA), Key Stages (UK), Victorian curriculum (AUS) and the Australian curriculum (see disclaimer[link]). This resource in particular links to the following standards: Common Core Standards: [CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1] [CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.4]: Australian Curriculum Standards: [ACHHS206] [ACHHS149] [ACHHS208] [ACHHS152] Victorian Curriculum Standards: [VCHHC083] Key Stages (based on The Historical Association guidelines - non statutory): KS2 - Develop the appropriate use of historical terms & Understand how knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources. Embedded Historical Thinking Concepts & High Impact Teaching Strategies (HITS): Collaborative Learning Explicit Teaching Setting Goals Questioning Structuring Lessons Use Historical Sources as Evidence For more detail on the above elements please read my Historical Thinking guide & High Impact Teaching Strategies guide found on my website. Be sure to follow The Teacher’s Squire on Pinterest. Also sign up to my newsletter from my website to view new product releases, classroom tips, summaries of new research and more!
Primary and Secondary Sources: Advanced Level
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Primary and Secondary Sources: Advanced Level

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Overview: This resource is designed for students approximately 13-16 years of age, it engages students of History by revealing more complex concepts and definitions that are understood and used by historians. For instance, this resource goes into detail on the complexity of identifying primary and secondary source material, it includes a variety of sources and complex subject specific vocabulary. This resource includes over thirty pages of content including: A 2 page lesson plan with clear step by step instructions, references to scholarly material and strategies used within the lesson, Additional ‘teacher note pages’ which outline the pedagogical choices made for each activity, APK (introductory activities) that are in both projected and printable format, A 5 page detailed worksheet that examines the complexity of identifying primary and secondary source material (with examples), this includes the ‘exceptions’ to the common definitions used by historians, A 2 page activity asking students to categorise six sources on Julius Caesar using their new knowledge on source types, A 2 page activity asking students to not only categorise a further 5 sources (this time on WWI) but to identify a common theme between these sources with their peers, All activities are also differentiated for English as an additional language (EAL) audiences, A mini-lesson is included for teachers who need to teach accurate citation of sources to their students, Information sheets for Historical Thinking concepts, HITS & GANAG. **On Curriculum: ** Each resource I design directly links to a variety of curriculum contexts including: Common Core standards (USA), Key Stages (UK), Victorian curriculum (AUS) and the Australian curriculum (see disclaimer). This resource in particular links to the following standards (click on the code for a link to the content descriptor): Common Core Standards: [CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1] [CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.4]: Australian Curriculum Standards: [ACHHS206] [ACHHS149][ACHHS208] [ACHHS152] [ACHHS207] [ACHSS150] Victorian Curriculum Standards: [VCHHC083][VCHHC099] Key Stages (based on The Historical Association guidelines – non statutory): [KS2][KS3] Embedded Historical Thinking Concepts & High Impact Teaching Strategies (HITS): Collaborative Learning Explicit Teaching Setting Goals Questioning Structuring Lessons Use Historical Sources as Evidence For more detail on the above elements please read my Historical Thinking guide & High Impact Teaching Strategies guide found on my website. Be sure to follow The Teacher’s Squire on Pinterest. Also sign up to my newsletter from my website to view new product releases, classroom tips, summaries of new research and more!
Differentiated Source Analysis Template Bundle
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Differentiated Source Analysis Template Bundle

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Four Source Analysis Templates for Students of History **Overview: ** These source analysis templates were designed with the latest pedagogical research on historical thinking in mind as each template provides students with the ability to understand not only the importance of source material when studying history but a variety of skills that must be used when doing so (such as identification, contextualisation and corroboration). About the templates: Wineburg Method of Primary Source Analysis: Designed from Sam Wineburg’s research this template asks students to go through the steps historians use when researching (sourcing, contextualising, close reading and corroboration) by answering a series of questions. VanSledright’s Method of Primary Source Analysis: Designed from Bruce VanSledright’s research this template asks students to answer a series of questions allocated to the four stages of source analysis as identified by VanSledright in his research (identification, attribution, judging perspectives and reliability assessment). The 7 C’s Method (modified from the ubiquitous 6 C’s method): This method was designed so that students methodically unpack the key components of a source through a series of themed questions. The 7 C’s include: Content, Citation, Context, Connections, Communication, Contribution & Corroboration. The O.R.I Method: Designed from my use in the classroom for historical inquiry this method examines three stages of source analysis common in the classroom: Observation (focusing on close analysis of the source), Reflection (focusing on generating hypotheses about the source), Identification (focusing on identifying key aspects of the source). Why four templates? Each template differs due to the varying level of analysis required for particular activities and due to the differing learning styles of our students. **Can I use them for assessment? ** Each template also comes with a list of curriculum content descriptors from the US, UK, Australian and Victorian curriculum’s for easy reporting. **Anything else? ** Instructions on how to use each template as well as the pedagogy behind each template can be found in each document. For a more detailed explanation check out my blog post #2. Embedded Historical Thinking Concepts & High Impact Teaching Strategies (HITS): Chronology Historical Significance Sources as Evidence Historical Perspectives Collaborative Learning Explicit Teaching Questioning For more detail on the above elements please read my Historical Thinking guide & High Impact Teaching Strategies guide on my website. Be sure to follow The Teacher’s Squire on Pinterest! Also sign up to my newsletter from my website to view new product releases, classroom tips, summaries of new research and more!
Historical Inquiry: Contextualising Clues Activity
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Historical Inquiry: Contextualising Clues Activity

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Need to reinvent how you use primary sources in the classroom? Want to encourage students to go on a journey to understand a source? This freebie is for you! The activities in this resource give students the opportunity to unpack the complexity of primary source images by investigating its smaller components individually and in groups. A fantastic activity for any History classroom as an APK task or Application task. Be sure to follow The Teacher’s Squire on Pinterest. Also sign up to my newsletter from my website to view new product releases, classroom tips, summaries of new research and more!
Portraying the Other During the Crusading Era
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Portraying the Other During the Crusading Era

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**Overview: ** This assessment resource is designed for students studying the crusades in a Medieval Europe unit of work. Using best practice through a historical inquiry task students are asked to answer the question, ‘To what extent did the perspectives of Christians and Muslims towards each other change over time during the Crusading Era’. **This resource has over forty pages of content and includes: ** Seven pages of teacher notes, explaining the pedagogy behind the varying elements of the assessment task, incuding direct curriculum links to the US, UK, Australian and Victorian curricula, 12 Primary sources from the crusading era (translated into English) with definitions of content specific words, and numbered lines for easy analysis. A student assessment task booklet with all planning documentation, worksheets and sources, all you have to do is print! Four templates of source analysis to encourage student agency in historical inquiry, A list of additional supplementary source material to use specific to your cohort, A detailed skills based rubric that can be used for any historical inquiry task, editable for your class and linked directly to the US, UK, Australian and Victorian curricula, Information sheets for Historical Thinking concepts & High Impact Teaching Strategies. On Curriculum: Each resource I design directly links to a variety of curriculum contexts including: Common Core standards (USA), Key Stages (UK), Victorian curriculum (Aus) and the Australian curriculum. This resource in particular links to several elements - in fact its too many to place on here. It meets 7 content descriptors in the Victorian Curriculum, 20 from the UK curriculum, 19 in the Australian curriculum and a whopping 45 content descriptors for the Common Core! For more information and to view the various curriculum descriptors look at the preview where this information is available. Embedded Historical Thinking Concepts & High Impact Teaching Strategies (HITS): Questioning Differentiated Learning Feedback Setting Goals Sources as Evidence Cause & Consequence Continuity & Change Chronology Historical Significance Historical Perspectives For more detail on the above elements please read my Historical Thinking guide & High Impact Teaching Strategies guide found on my website. Be sure to follow The Teacher’s Squire on Pinterest. Also sign up to my newsletter from my website to view new product releases, classroom tips, summaries of new research and more!
On the Origins of the Medieval Knight: Understanding their Historical Significance
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On the Origins of the Medieval Knight: Understanding their Historical Significance

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Overview: This resource is designed for students studying Medieval Europe through a variety of activities students will be able to identify how knights emerged as an influential element of 12th century Medieval society. They will also learn about the broader social context of Medieval society by examining feudalism and the three orders. They will do this by utilising their historical skills by evaluating events in terms of their historical significance, identifying cause and consequence, as well as change and continuity, completing source analysis tasks and creating historical arguments based on evidence. This resource also includes formative and summative assessment you can set in class and use for reporting purposes. This resource includes over sixty pages of content including: A 6 page lesson plan for five one hour lessons with clear step by step instructions, references to scholarly material and strategies used within the lesson and links to the US, UK & Australian curriculums, Additional ‘teacher note pages’ which outline the pedagogical choices made for each activity, APK (introductory activities) for each lesson that are in both projected and printable format, such as quizzes, fill in the gap tasks and more! A 5 page detailed information sheet that examines the origins of knights from the Iron Ages all the way up to the 12th century, with a 2 page comprehension & analysis worksheet. A 2 page information sheet on feudalism and how it relates to knights, and an associated compass task activity to get students up out of their chairs and engaged in the class, Collaborative Learning Card Activity that you can use for any lesson, breaking down new information in an engaging way, Detailed answer sheets for EVERY activity, this includes paragraph exemplar responses, short answer responses and timeline activities, A historical significance timeline task, which encourages students to not only take a historical perspective but to practice justifying such a perspective with evidence, includes an extension task for your accelerated learners, An in depth primary source activity, using the ORI method of The Teacher’s Squire, A fun wordsearch and crossword for key vocabulary learnt over all of the lessons (with answer sheets), One Formative Assessment Task with a feedback sheet AND One Summative Assessment Task with a feedback sheet, so you can be able to show a students progress easily in your reporting, Information sheets for Historical Thinking concepts, HITS & GANAG.