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Science Resources by Anna Duncan

Science resources for the Scottish curriculum from National 4 to Advanced Higher.

Science resources for the Scottish curriculum from National 4 to Advanced Higher.
Worksheet - Fertilisers - National 5 Chemistry
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Worksheet - Fertilisers - National 5 Chemistry

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Worksheet (30-45 min) This activity can be completed individually, in pairs or in small groups. Curriculum This activity is based on Unit 3.4 Fertilisers from “Chemistry in Society”. The key skills which are assessed in this activity are: Distinguishing natural and synthetic fertilisers; Expressing the physical state of species using symbols; Writing a word equation of the Haber Process; Converting the word equation into a chemical equation; Balancing the chemical equation; Justifying why nitrogen in the air cannot be absorbed by plants; Recalling the conditions of the Haber Process; Understanding the challenges of Haber Process; Using a catalyst to increase the rate of reaction; Recalling previous knowledge of mixture separation techniques to explain that liquid ammonia is easier to separate from a gaseous mixture than gaseous ammonia; Justifying the use of synthetic fertilisers; Understanding the causes and effects of eutrophication; Introducing changes to the process conditions to maximise the yield while minimising the costs. Numeracy: Balancing a chemical equation; Understanding low, moderate and high temperatures; Making the connection between large fields and large amounts of fertiliser needed; Linking high pressure to high operating costs; Using recycling to minimise waste and maximise the yield. Differentiation The Century Gothic font is one of those recommended by the British Dyslexia Association. The first tasks have a simple layout to encourage the weaker pupils and build up their confidence to tackle the harder tasks ahead. Pupils can complete this activity independently and work at their own pace. It can also be completed on a laptop or a tablet by pupils with dyspraxia.
Murder Mystery - Nuclear Chemistry - National 5 Chemistry
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Murder Mystery - Nuclear Chemistry - National 5 Chemistry

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Based on a true story! This activity is based on Unit 3.5 Nuclear Chemistry from “Chemistry in Society” although some questions can also be linked to Unit 1.2 Atomic Structure from “Chemical Changes and Structure”. The key skills which are assessed in this activity are: • Manipulating equations involving half-life, time, and # of half-lives; • Representing the amount left after a # of half-lives as a fraction; • Solving decay equations; • Comparing the penetration of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation; • Expressing isotopes using nuclide notation; • Recognising the information given in mass and atomic numbers; • Describing the properties of protons, neutrons, and electrons.   Numeracy: • Manipulating equations involving half-life, time, and # of half-lives; • Converting percentages to fractions; • Using multiplication and division to calculate the # of half-lives; • Using addition and subtraction to solve decay equations; • Adding the days between 1 November and 3 August. Literacy: • Collecting information from the story and the list of suspects; • Solving the crossword puzzle; • Converting Greek alphabet into Latin alphabet. • Making the connection between Mendeleev and Russia, Mr Vladimir and Vladimir Putin, and Maria Sklodowska-Curie and polonium. How to use it in the classroom? This activity can be completed individually, in pairs or in small groups. Murder Mystery (30-45 min) The number of tasks and the range of topics covered allows pupils to distribute the tasks (Clues) according to their preferred topics. After completing each task, they can exchange information within the group to eliminate the innocent suspects and gradually find out more details about the murderer and the radioactive isotope. Murder Mystery – Extended Version (45-60 min) Each pupil or group is initially given the story, the list of suspects and Clue 1. They need to successfully complete Clue 1 and ‘pay’ before they are given the next task, i.e. Clue 2. The ‘payment’ could be anything from singing a song, telling a joke (maybe a bonus for a chemistry pun?) to answering a short question e.g. “What is the charge of an electron?”. As a teacher you can select a few appropriate ‘payment methods’ knowing the personality of your pupils and potential risks (inappropriate jokes, sectarian songs etc). Some of them may find singing in the classroom childish while others may genuinely enjoy it. You are in control because you select the options they can choose from while they benefit from Blended Learning and do not feel forced into doing something they are not comfortable with. It is also an opportunity for you to get to know them better based on their choices (and jokes).
Problem Solving - Fertilisers - National 5 Chemistry
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Problem Solving - Fertilisers - National 5 Chemistry

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How to use it in the classroom? Problem Solving (10 min) This activity can be completed individually, in pairs or in small groups. Pupils are given a list of 8 problems and 8 solutions (table or flashcards). They need to match each problem with the appropriate solution. All the problems and solutions are related to fertilisers and the Haber Process. Should you choose to use the flashcards, please consider laminating them after printing and reusing them to reduce the amount of paper waste. Curriculum This activity is based on Unit 3.4 Fertilisers from “Chemistry in Society”. The key skills which are assessed in this activity are: Solving previously unseen problems; Understanding the challenges of Haber Process; Using a catalyst to increase the rate of reaction; Recalling previous knowledge of mixture separation techniques to explain that liquid ammonia is easier to separate from a gaseous mixture than gaseous ammonia; Justifying why nitrogen in the air cannot be absorbed by plants; Justifying the use of synthetic fertilisers; Introducing changes to the process conditions to maximise the yield while minimising the costs. Numeracy: Understanding low, moderate and high temperatures; Making the connection between large fields and large amounts of fertiliser needed; Linking high pressure to high operating costs; Using recycling to minimise waste and maximise the yield. Differentiation The Century Gothic font is one of those recommended by the British Dyslexia Association. Pupils can complete this activity independently of others and work at their own pace. The activity can be carried out individually to suit the pupils who prefer to work on their own. It can also be completed on a laptop or a tablet by pupils with dyspraxia.