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MandyEnglish

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Moderator and associate examiner for Edexcel. Previous examiner for AQA. Lecturer of GCSE English for 6 years.

Moderator and associate examiner for Edexcel. Previous examiner for AQA. Lecturer of GCSE English for 6 years.
GCSE English QR Code Poster
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GCSE English QR Code Poster

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Learners can download a QR code reader app on an iPad/smart phone and read the codes. The codes link to Youtube videos, BBC Bitesize and quizzes. The topics include: 25 facts you didn't know about the English Language Descriptive writing Features of a short story Language features Punctuation Similes and metaphors Spelling Story structure Opinion Compare and contrast Spelling and grammar games Writing to argue Writing to persuade Show don't tell Figurative language Literary devices 20th Century texts Analysing literature Comparing 20th and 21st century texts Technology
Edexcel Revision Leaflet
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Edexcel Revision Leaflet

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This is a breakdown of the new Edexcel Spec Paper 1 & 2. The leaflet offers a breakdown of what each question is asking them to do, what to look for and how many marks each question carries.
AQA GCSE English Language Revision Leaflet
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AQA GCSE English Language Revision Leaflet

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AQA GCSE English Language revision leaflet with a breakdown of each question which includes the key points from the mark scheme, marks awarded and amount of time spent for each question. It also includes a language features glossary, QR codes with links to revision sites and videos, a SPaG revision section and much more.
Edexcel GCSE English Week 6
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Edexcel GCSE English Week 6

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Lesson one: "The lesson begins with having the learners provide the titles of their stories that they are to write this week. The idea is that these titles were to have been formed as part of their homework from the previous week. Following this, the word of the day is to be displayed and copied into the books of the students. Next is the starter task. That is to write an example or definition of a list of language features that have been placed on the board. Again, these are to be written at the back of the learners’ books to help form their glossary of terms. Next is the task on tension. This consists of playing the youtube clip and having the students answer the question in the form of a summary. Once this has been completed, the students must then be handed the writing checklist that they must then peruse. Finally, the rest of the lesson should be spent planning their final piece of writing. " Lesson two: "The lesson begins with recalling the previous lesson, word of the day and starter task. The starter task is to complete the ‘replace the word’ task, as shown on the presentation. Students are to replace words in the sentences provided but thre sentences must retain the same meaning. Once this is completed, the students then have the rest of the lesson to complete the writing task that the last six weeks has been building to. " Lesson three: “Once the aims and objectives and word of the day has been explained by the lecturer, students should then complete the starter task, which is a simple ‘replace the words’ task. After this, learners should take their checklist provided in the previous lesson and look back through their work. They now have the opportunity to self assess and reflect upon their writing. Once they have finished reading through their work and making any adjustments necessary, they should then hand in their work to the lecturer for marking. Finally, the students are to be given the 19th century text from Crime and Punishment. They should then explain to what extent the writer has achieved the goal expressed on the powerpoint. Students should be given their weekly task of finding a new word for next week. ”
Edexcel GCSE English Week 5
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Edexcel GCSE English Week 5

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Lesson one: "Language and Structure:The task begins by reiterating the aims and objectives provided.The lesson continues with the lecturer commencing with a fill in the blanks starter task. We then move in to the word of the day. This is to be written at the back of students’ books as part of an ongoing glossary of terms and new words that are to be inserted into their writing over the course of the academic year. Lecturers should then follow the presentation and explain the structural features that are outlined. After this point, students will then be provided with the Oliver Twist hand out and split into four seperate groups and answering the following questions: Who are the main characters from your paragraph? What is happening to them? Which structural features are at work? Is there any unusual language? Provide examples from the text on post-it notes and place on the wall. After this, students should gather all of the information around the room and collate it in their books. Following this, the lecturer should provide the students with the sentence starters provided on the board and have them summarise the key structural and language features from the text as a whole. " Lesson two: "The task begins by reiterating the aims and objectives provided. The class continues with the word of the day starter task, which involves the students writing the word of the day into the back of their books. Learners are then to watch the video provided and answer the questions that are on the board. After this, the learners will do a similar task, but this time, they must read the modern text and answer the questions provided. Now students will expand upon their text analysis by reading the 19th century text provided and answering key questions provided by using PEA paragraphs. " Lesson three: “The task begins by reiterating the aims and objectives provided. This is followed by the word of the day starter task, where students are to write the new word into the back of their books to help build their glossary of terms. Then, there is a short formative task, the scores of which are to be recorded on etracker. Lecturers are then to explain the common mistakes as outlined on the powerpoint presentation. Once this is completed, students are to then read the charles Dickens 19th century text and answer the question that relates to Q4 on paper 1. The homework for this lesson is for students to plan a piece of writing for week 8, as outlined on the slides. ”
Edexcel GCSE English Week 1
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Edexcel GCSE English Week 1

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I have planned a term with the theme of Crime. Within these lessons, students will meet all of the assessment objectives they will face in their exams. Lesson one: Lesson Objectives: To identify what constitutes as crime To analyse a 19th Century style clip To explain and construct a mug shot drawing and create a Facebook profile Lesson two: Lesson Objectives: To identify the characters in a murder mystery To formulate a plan To resolve the murder mystery Lesson three: Lesson Objectives: To describe a famous criminal To identify and discuss outdated crimes Construct a comparison of a law that has changed Create your own law
Full Lesson on Travel Writing
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Full Lesson on Travel Writing

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A full lesson on travel writing, including videos and activities. Q) Write a short piece  of  travel writing explaining how you coped with an emergency. Remember to: write a short piece of travel writing use language to explain.
Edexcel GCSE English Week 4
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Edexcel GCSE English Week 4

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Lesson one: “Starter - Picture on each table. Students in groups to answer the following - What do you think could be going on in the picture? What 21st Century crime is being committed? How long has this been a crime? How much is it reported in the media? Introduce prostitution as a crime. Discuss Holbeck in Leeds where they have legalised prostitution. Why have they done this? Introduce Jack the Ripper. What do the students know about the murders? How do the women, crimes, soliciting and drugs differ? How is the Ripper text different from today’s articles? Are there any sources quoted? Are there any words or phrases that identify it as 19th century?” Lesson two: "Writers’ viewpoint and perspectives of two video clips. How has crime reporting changed in the last 40 years? Is there a difference in the way people speak? The sources they use? The camera angles? Summarise these differences providing examples from the videos as reference. Now, in groups, read through the two articles from the Jack the Ripper murders published in 1888. How do these differ from the two reports you have watched from 1981 and 2016? How does the language and structure of the reports influence the audience? " Lesson three: “Starter - word jumble Split into group and hand out the pack on Modern Day Slavery Students to read through front sheet and case study and complete crib sheets Feedback to class Class discussion on the effect and any experiences”
Edexcel GCSE English Week 2
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Edexcel GCSE English Week 2

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Lesson one: "Crime Role Play. Students to get into groups of 4. Each person has a role and needs to argue their point with evidence and clear argument. Intro to famous trials. In pairs, learners to name as many celebrities they can who have committed crimes. What crime did they commit? Were they found guilty? In pairs, list as many famous trials they can think of. Choose one and summarise everything that you know about the trial. Use a spider diagram to get all the points together then students to summarise in sentences. " Lesson two: Michelle Carter case. Picture - who is the girl? What did she do? Looking at messages she sent to her boyfriend - what type of language is being used? Was she manipulative? Looking at second picture wearing pink. How does she feel? How do you know? Encourage inference. What could be going through her mind? If you were her friend, would you support her? Class discussion on the evidence and dangers of using social media and text messages in that way. Should you say something because your friends are doing so? Look at message Michelle sent to friend a couple of months after her boyfriend’s death. What does it tell you about Michelle? How did she feel? Look at language used. Lesson three: Looking at the influence of social media in the London Riots. Watch video clip on riots - class to discuss their views. In groups, give three articles on the riots - students to summarise each article and list reasons for riots happening. Discuss what crimes were committed. Discuss impact of social media on riots - what was the role? Find statements and evidence.
AO4 AO1 Oxfam
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AO4 AO1 Oxfam

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This resource looks at both AO4 and AO1 in two Oxfam texts. The first being an open letter written by the Chief Exec regarding the recent Oxfam scandal, the other being an article reporting on the same topic. Students will analyse both texts using a guided resource and answer questions on both.
Edexcel GCSE English Week 3
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Edexcel GCSE English Week 3

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Lesson one: "The lesson begins with the lecturer explaining the meaning of inference. Students are then split into groups and given a series of tweets, from which, they have to decipher who would be behind a story like this? What would they have to gain? What can we infer? Students are then asked to create two fake news tweets/facebook posts of their own. Finally, students will be asked to answer write a brief summary outlining their views on the point: There are two opposing views of whether hand guns should be outlawed. Some believe they cause crime, others believe they prevent it. Write a brief summary of why you believe hand guns should be legal or illegal, depending on your viewpoint. Remember to mention the opposite argument and disprove it with your own. " Lesson two: Students must first read the decription from The Maltese Falcon and draw the character as described. Students should then watch the video and answer the questions provided on screen. An extract from The Girl With The Dragon Tatoo will then be dislpayed. Learners should then search the text to answer the questions provided on the board. Students are the given an individual task to use descriptive language to provide a vivid description of a criminal that the learners have just witnessed that could easily be translated by an artist – thinking about age, height, weight, hair colour, eye colour, facial features, clothing and anything else that may be useful. Lesson three: The lessons starts with reading the text from the board and answering the questions provided. Students should then turn to a blank page in their books and write on each line ABABABA. Learners have to imagine they were in a bank and three masked men walked in to rob it. They should then write a brief account for police about being in the bank as it happened and describe in as much detail as possible. Students should only write their account on the A lines. The youtube video should then be played and students should take notes throughout this. Now, lecturers should then explain to the learners the definitions of metaphors, similes and alliteration. Students should then, on all the ‘B’ lines, set about replacing their description with language features and extended vocabulary. Lecturers can then mark the learners’ improvements.