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Documenting change in British society and politics. Learning resources based on our primary source material, mainly on reform and records of social and political history from the late nineteenth to the early twenty-first centuries.

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Documenting change in British society and politics. Learning resources based on our primary source material, mainly on reform and records of social and political history from the late nineteenth to the early twenty-first centuries.
The War and the Flu
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The War and the Flu

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Four lessons about the end of the First World War and the influenza pandemic in 1918-19. The lessons here are a prelude to a project to record the experiences, opinions and feelings of children during the coronavirus pandemic a pilot project run by LSE. These four lessons introduce an historical epidemic and thinking about how we remember it as a way in to explore and allow expression of children’s experiences of the coronavirus. However, they can also be used as individual lessons just to look at the end of the war and the epidemic. Outcomes: • Learn about the 1918-20 Influenza Epidemic to understand that similar epidemics have happened before. • To understand that people were emotionally affected by events, such as the influenza epidemic, in history. • To introduce forms of remembering around loss, e.g. war memorials, and historic events, e.g. plaques. • To reassure children that worries and anxious feelings are shared and normal
The Welfare State 1900-1948 KS3
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The Welfare State 1900-1948 KS3

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These notes and lesson presentations /plans are informed by the London School of Economics and Political Science Library exhibition on the Welfare State in 2018 that marked the 75th anniversary of the Beveridge Report. In December 1942 the government released a report authored by Sir William Beveridge in which he wrote “A revolutionary moment in the world's history is a time for revolutions, not for patching”. His report laid the foundations for Britain’s post war welfare state while the world was still at war. The exhibition took the Beveridge Report as its starting point but looked at how welfare provision has been shaped and changed through the ages. Images and textual evidence are mainly taken from the heritage collections in the London School of Politics and Economics (LSE). Links or image information are provided when different archival sources are used. This is an open access resource under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any non-commercial medium, provided the original work is properly cited. These notes and powerpoint presentations, including slides that can be turned into class worksheets or activities, are written to support key stage 3 History. They follow topics in the National Curriculum section: Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day They can be taught together for an in-depth topic around social reform and the ‘Creation of the Welfare State’. Or taught separately to cover (A) social reform in the 1900s, (B) the Great Depression and the impact on Britain, and (C) the creation of the Welfare State.
William Beveridge, Unemployment and Broadcasting in the 1930s
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William Beveridge, Unemployment and Broadcasting in the 1930s

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Primary Sources to understand responses in the period to unemployment and the development of broadcast media in Britain for AS / A-Level History. Curriculum Links: AQA History – Wars and Welfare: Britain in Transition, 1906 – 1957 (Social and cultural impact of the Depression and radio in the 1930s) and Challenge and Transformation: Britain 1851-1964 (Growth of Media, Depression, and Condition of the working classes). Pearson Edexcel History – Route H: Democracies in Change: Britain and the USA in the twentieth century- changing quality of life and Paper 3 Option 34.2: Poverty, public health and the state in Britain, c 1780 – 1939. Depression and the Dole. A presentation and teachers notes with more information with original sources and background information: archival sources from LSE Collections: pointers can be given on using historical evidence and evaluating it for more depth background information is provided in the notes can recap on what they have learnt on unemployment in the UK in the 1930s links to changing role of women in society Can use to introduce Beveridge and some of the motivations behind The Beveridge Report, 1942
The Beveridge Report and the Creation of the Welfare State
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The Beveridge Report and the Creation of the Welfare State

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In December 1942 the government released a report authored by Sir William Beveridge in which he wrote “A revolutionary moment in the world’s history is a time for revolutions, not for patching”. His report laid the foundations for Britain’s post war welfare state while the world was still at war. This resource is based on an exhibition that was held in the Library Gallery at the London School of Politics and Economics in January – April 2018 to mark the 75th anniversary of the publication of the Beveridge Report and the 70th anniversary of the Welfare State. Images and textual evidence for this resource are taken from the heritage collections in the Library of the London School of Politics and Economics (LSE). William Beveridge’s papers are held in LSE Library as are papers belonging to numerous politicians, activists and campaigning groups. Transcripts and images of original documents are provided on the powerpoint slides and the teachers’ notes provide support contextual and background information. These resources can assist with learning activities around the understanding of causes and consequences, making links between different perspectives and awareness of the roles of different individuals, ideologies groups and ideas. References are made to the perspectives of historians writing on this area and finish with different historiographic approaches. Supports aspects of the schemes of work for: • Edexcel Paper 1, Option 1 H: Britain Transformed, 1918 – 1997. Theme 2: Creating a Welfare State • AQA 1G Challenge and Transformation: Britain c. 1851 – 1964. The impact of the Second World War on British politics – The Labour Landslide of 1945 and Developments in social policy – the Beveridge Report • AQA 2M Wars and Welfare: Britain in Transition, 1906 – 1957. Part Two. The Emergence of the affluent society; Section 2: the People’s War and Peace, 1939-1951. The social and cultural impact of ‘total’ war – the Blitz and plans for reconstruction.
Significant People: William Beveridge  Or ‘Why don’t we pay to see a doctor?
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Significant People: William Beveridge Or ‘Why don’t we pay to see a doctor?

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A look at the life of William Beveridge, Baron Beveridge (1879-1963) who was a social reformer and architect of the Beveridge Report, which led to the National Health Service and welfare state. Includes a powerpoint, teachers notes with ideas for activities and flashcards and a telegram template. Curriculum links for Key Stage One History: Significant People and Events, aspects of change in national life, events within living memory, World War II and post 1945 to the present. Literacy: Learning new words and meanings, writing short sentences. PSHE: healthcare, understanding society, British values The sources used in this resource are taken from the Beveridge collection of papers and photographs in the archives of the Library at the London School of Economics, with the exception of the Pathe film footage (available for free on youtube) and photograph of the bombed house. The sources can be used to illustrate the person and events you are talking about but could also be used to think about chronology and cause in history. Importantly the sources can be used to get students to think about how we know about the past through primary evidence. Questions of inquiry around the source can be used to draw out information about the photograph or document and add to the knowledge about this event or person.
Streets of London 1870-1900
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Streets of London 1870-1900

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Mapping life in Victorian Covent Garden Curriculum links: KS3 History – Industry, Empire and Social Change 1745-1901: Social Pyramid, Leisure time, Streets, Philanthropy (Charles Booth) KS3 Geography – Human Environment: Urban Change This resource includes primary source documents - photographs and maps - that can be used to support historical enquiry. They can be used to ask and answer questions about poverty, philanthropy and leisure in the Victorian period.
EPQ: Topic Sources, Searches and Referencing
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EPQ: Topic Sources, Searches and Referencing

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This Presentation is for students in the first few weeks or month or two of an Extended Project Qualification or extended essay. It covers: Defining a topic for an extended project (essay / presentation) Breaking it down into keywords / concepts Applying key words into search engines (online, catalogues) Understanding different types of resources Briefly introduces referencing (Harvard) There is a video of the presentation, a powerpoint presentation and a student worksheet.
Women, Murder and Poverty in 1880s Whitechapel
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Women, Murder and Poverty in 1880s Whitechapel

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The notes cover the background and context of the murders of five women in Whitechapel in 1888, usually known as the ‘Ripper Murders’. However, drawing on Hallie Rubenhold’s book The Five, these notes offer a focus on the women who were murdered rather than the murderer as well as contextual information about Whitechapel in the 1880s. These notes give further information to teachers / people supporting learning on the primary source documents - photographs, posters and maps - in the powerpoint. The documents can be used to support historical enquiry into poverty, social structures, women and crime in the late Victorian period. Discussion questions and some activities are provided. The primary evidence includes photographs by John Thomson and descriptions by Adolphe Smith from their 1877 Street Life in London and the maps produced by Charles Booth in 1898-99. It refers to notebooks of interviews made by Booth’s volunteers in the collections of the Library of the London School of Economics (LSE) – for more information see https://booth.lse.ac.uk. It also draws on archives from the Campaign Against the Contagious Diseases Act.
Mrs Dalloway, Woolf and Women’s Magazines
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Mrs Dalloway, Woolf and Women’s Magazines

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Historicist and feminist approaches are introduced through placing Mrs Dalloway in the context of women’s magazines to show how context can assist in determining the meaning in the book and expand on the theme of women in literature and society. This resource assists students to: • show knowledge and understanding of the ways that texts can be grouped and compared to inform interpretation • show knowledge and understanding of the contexts in which texts have been produced and received, and understanding of how these contexts influence meaning • understand the ways in which texts relate to one another and to literary traditions, movements and genres • understand the significance of cultural and contextual influences on readers and writers This resource has been developed in association with the AHRC-funded project ‘Time and Tide: Connections and Legacies’ directed by Catherine Clay, Associate Professor in Feminist and Literary Studies at Nottingham Trent University, UK. For more information about the project, visit the project website: https://www.timeandtidemagazine.org This project aims to introduce the history of Time and Tide and related interwar women’s periodicals to a wider public through a host of centenary celebrations including: a Souvenir Edition of Time and Tide, a Festival of Women Writers and Journalists, and an Exhibition of Interwar Women’s Magazines at the Women’s Library, LSE. This is an open access resource under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any non-commercial medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Women and Politics: Interwar British History
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Women and Politics: Interwar British History

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Articles and letters in the centenary issue of the political and literary magazine Time and Tide are useful material for British domestic politics in the interwar period, particularly on the changing role of women (including the 1928 franchise act) and reactions to the international situation in the 1930s. These notes concern a few of the articles and letters reprinted in the centenary issue of Time and Tide, which is available here. These notes give teachers more information, while students are given some context to enable them to position the evidence, have some understanding of cause and effect and use their own knowledge / carry out research. These notes and the student worksheets can be used to support A / AS Level History Edexcel Route H: Democracies in Change – Britain Transformed 1918 – 1997, AQA 2M: Wars and Welfare: Britain in Transition and OCR Britain c. 1918 – 1951.
Eye Witnesses to Peace 1918-20: Forming the League of Nations
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Eye Witnesses to Peace 1918-20: Forming the League of Nations

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An education resource for one or two lessons focusing on individuals who witnessed the aftermath of the First World War in Britain and Europe and tried to improve the fragile peace through documents from LSE Archives, including the Women’s Library Collection. These notes and presentation cover ‘Peace-making’ and the formation of The League of Nations for the early part of the ‘inter-war years 1918-1939’ topic at GCSE level, with extra content that can be adapted for A Level. A Level and / or Citizenship sections are marked in orange. Presented within contextual information about the background of the armistice, the Paris Peace Treaty and the formation of the League of Nations, primary sources are presented alongside the story of the person whose archive it belongs to: Beatrice Webb, Eglantyne Jebb, Charles Kingsley Webster, Catherine Marshall and Rachel Crowdy. These five eye witnesses were all involved either in witnessing the painstaking process of agreeing a settlement for the war in the peace conferences, attempting to improve conditions for people after the war or trying to ensure that this was the ‘war to end all wars’ through a lasting peace. It draws on documents within LSE Archives to provide source work materials and exercises around reading primary sources. The resource is linked to sections on the League of Nations in the Giving Peace a Chance: From the League of Nations to Greenham Common exhibition at LSE Library 4 January – 17 April 2019, which were curated by Professor David Stevenson, LSE International History.
What’s in a Wall: Signs and Symbols of peace, gender, protest and hope
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What’s in a Wall: Signs and Symbols of peace, gender, protest and hope

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Powerpoint and videos to plan an active workshop that combines making with thinking about symbolism. This workshop draws on the peace image, protest, making your voice heard and creative art. The idea is to make a wall of debate, hope and working together to combine different ideas. Walls built to exclude people can be subverted and have been (and are) used for protest art. This workshop could be done over the course of a day or over 2-3 afternoons. It incorporates archive material from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and related personal archives held at the Library of the London School of Economics (LSE). The videos are made by artist Becci Kenning and based on a project we carried out in primary schools during 2019. Who is it for: Upper Key Stage 2 – Year 5 or 6. Year 4 can do this but may need more help with the first section. Cross-Curriculum Links & Learning Outcomes: ● Retrieve information from text, widen reading, understand and make slogans, distinguish between fact and opinion, gives justifications for decisions made (English) ● Understanding symbols and how to use them – encouraging participation in politics and thinking critically and debate (Citizenship). ● Making connections from the ancient world (Egypt) to the modern (History) ● Working individually and then together (PSE). ● Practical task of constructing a wall, using tools and understanding function and aesthetic qualities (Design and Technology). ● Using different materials (Art and Design) This lesson has been developed in conjunction with a European Research Council grant titled Gendered Peace, located in the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security. This grant takes an interdisciplinary approach to provide new understandings of the spectrum of peace and conflict, while centring a gender analysis.
Votes for Women: Suffrage Oral Histories
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Votes for Women: Suffrage Oral Histories

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These videos of short audio clips and images of related suffrage materials from the Women’s Library focus on the role of the Pankhursts, The Women’s Social and Political Union and increased militancy from 1912-14. They are particularly suitable for A Level Edexcel History: Protest, agitation and parliamentary reform in Britain, c. 1780 – 1928, topic 3.6 The Women’s Social and Political Union, 1903-14. They can also be used for the Votes for Women topic in Key Stage 3 History and the development of the political system of government in Key Stage 3 Citizenship. They could be used for the Equality and Rights module in GCSE History AQA & OCR. They could be used with younger students but please be aware of the description of violence and force feeding in some of the films. All these educational resources are open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any non-commercial medium, provided the original work is properly cited
Fading Rainbows - COVID19: Experiencing and Remembering the Pandemic
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Fading Rainbows - COVID19: Experiencing and Remembering the Pandemic

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These lessons draw on an historical epidemic and think about how we remember it as a way to explore and allow expression of children’s experiences of the coronavirus. They draw on a historical scrapbook in the LSE Library and recorded conversations with academics on peoples’ experiences of the pandemic from around the world. It is part of a project with a pilot school and the LSE Festival. The lessons embed Recovery Curriculum principles through encouraging discussion and reflection – these could be expanded in live online sessions or in the classroom when children return to school. It is an interdisciplinary mix of history, visual literacy, art / craft and PSHE. It is aimed at upper Key Stage 2 – Years 5 & 6 – but could be adapted for early KS3 Year 7. Includes 3 videos to explain art techniques in scrapbooking - collage, text, mapping - along with some examples. Outcomes: • Learn about the 1918-20 Influenza Epidemic and understand that epidemics happened in history • To understand that people were emotionally affected by events, such as influenza, in the past. • To introduce forms of remembering around loss, e.g. war memorials, and historic events • To enable the children to express their feelings about change in routine and freedom during the lockdown through art • To recognise attachment and the importance of relationships, whether in a family, in a class, with friends or more short-term ones, like with health care providers or people doing deliveries • To reassure children that worries and anxious feelings are shared and normal • To individually and as a community, remember what is happening and create a message of hope for the future • To build resilience. There are resources and links listed at the end of these notes, plus a worksheet produced by an artist for each lesson to help children record their experiences of lockdown and the pandemic. This is a pilot project so any feedback in the review section would be welcome.
Campaigning for Change: LGBT+ Activism 1970s & 80s
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Campaigning for Change: LGBT+ Activism 1970s & 80s

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The resource uses campaign material from the 1970s and 1980s in the Hall Carpenter Archives at LSE Library. The primary material is used to help explain terminology and introduce different forms of activism that helped change legislation as well as social and religious attitudes towards sexuality and same-sex relationships in Britain. This draws on material from activism carried out by members of The Campaign for Homosexual Equality (CHE), the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), OutRage! and the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement in the 1970s and 80s. A list of further reading and links to further resources, including digitised content, is available at the end of these notes. It covers the following curriculum topics and areas: RSE – Same Sex Relationships and Sexuality: tolerance towards others, how freedoms have come about in the UK, freedom of expression, campaigns for equality, positive relationships and an understanding of stereotypes. Citizenship – British Values: this reinforces tolerance around sexuality, how people form identity and how LGBTQIA people won rights in Britain. GCSE Religious Studies (AQA & OCR) – Relationships and Families: sexuality, homosexual relationships, same-sex marriage and co-habitation, same-sex parents. A Christian faith perspective that is positive around same-sex marriage and relationships.
The politics of walls, borders and barriers
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The politics of walls, borders and barriers

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This set of lessons designed for key stage 3 geography and history teachers explores the concepts of walls, borders and barriers, focusing on contemporary China. Key concepts covered include: borders, walls, barriers, flows, gateways, globalisation and urbanisation. The lessons, and multimedia throughout, feature comparative case studies of three famous walls: The Great Wall of China, the US/Mexico border and the Berlin Wall. The lessons draw on contemporary academic research on the politics of walls and research-based documentary films (which can be found at https://sensiblepolitics.net/filmmaking). Pupils will be encouraged to think critically about walls, both as sites of exclusion/inclusion - as well as gateways to personal experience and ideology. Curriculum links: Key Stage 3 Geography (Locational Knowledge, Human and Physical Geography) Key Stage 3 History These learning resources were produced through funding from The London School of Economics’ Knowledge Exchange and Impact (KEI) Fund awarded to Professor William Callahan in the Department of International Relations at the LSE, as part of his ongoing research. Further reading and outreach is available at Professor Callahan’s website: https://sensiblepolitics.net/publications Resource creation: Curriculum development: Laura Price Project management: Sara Wong With special thanks to Debbie Challis.
Sunbeams: Valuing Children & their Voices
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Sunbeams: Valuing Children & their Voices

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A brief history of the history of childhood, or how children were valued, from the 1800s to now, explains the concept of rights and human rights, looks at why the Declaration in 1924 and the Convention in 1989 was made and the impact of them. The last lesson brings Children’s Rights to date with new articles that have been ratified by the United Nations on children’s digital rights and covers security and good practice online. These lessons ask how did a message of hope for children come out of war, disease and famine? What can we learn from this? Can we do something similar after the COVID-19 pandemic? What do children think they and we (as adults, communities, schools, families etc) should do to create a happier future for them? The activities at the end of the lesson can be used to lead into an art project in which students make their raised arm and hand a sunbeam and write on it their hopes for the future. These can be put together collectively as a class. The project is based on the principles of the Recovery Curriculum, which stresses mental wellness, and is designed to give students their own agency. It aims to help children develop their voice and express themselves through words and art. It is for Upper Key Stage 2 (years 5/6) but could be adapted for Key Stage 3 Year 7/8. Lessons: One – Protecting Children Two – Saving Children Three – Declaring Children’s Rights Four – Children’s Rights in a Digital World Five – Declaring Your Rights (Art / Writing Activity) Curriculum Links: • History – Great People, Topic after 1066 – World War One and aftermath • Citizenship / British Values – Children’s Rights, Tolerance, International Relations • Art and Design – understanding symbols, imagery in art, new techniques • Literacy and Writing – understanding and writing demands, using and writing poetry • ICT – Understanding the possibilities of collaboration and awareness of safety online. • RSE – Mental wellbeing, understanding range of emotions and managing relationships / activities online. Learning Outcomes: • An understanding of Eglantyne Jebb, Dorothy Buxton, their work and their shared childhood • An understanding of how ideas around protecting and valuing children have changed. • The ability to discuss the concept of rights and consider how a concept is put into practice. • To listen to each other respectfully, express feelings and to share ideas. • Understanding and being able to recognise rights for children. • To understand the image and use of Sunbeams – what it means visually in art, nature etc.
At Last: Votes for Women 1908-1918 Presentation & Notes
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At Last: Votes for Women 1908-1918 Presentation & Notes

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These notes and powerpoint presentation are based on LSE Library’s At Last! Votes for Women exhibition, which concentrates on the campaign for women to have the vote from 1908 to 1918: They can be adapted for the Votes for Women topic in Key Stage 3 History and the development of the political system of - government in Key stage 3 Citizenship. They can be adapted for the Equality and Rights module in GCSE History AQA & OCR. They contain primary sources from the Women’s Library Collection. They include activity ideas, primary source comprehensions and a timeline All of these educational resources produced are open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any non-commercial medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Women in World War One: Endell Street Military Hospital
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Women in World War One: Endell Street Military Hospital

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Th PowerPoint presentation is based on the Endell Street – Women’s Military Hospital Project, which concentrates on the changing role of women from the 1900s to 1920, with a particular emphasis on women’s contribution to medicine and work in World War One. They contain primary sources from the Women’s Library. Aimed at Key stage 3 students but can be adapted for Key Stage 4. Produced by Digital Drama.
The Changing Role of Women: 1920s
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The Changing Role of Women: 1920s

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A timeline of the main legal changes affecting women from 1918 to 1929 is available to download as a PowerPoint The Changing Role of Women 1918-1929. This can be used in topics around the changing role of women in British society, particularly between the wars, in History, Sociology and Religious Studies. Download a ‘newspaper’ of case studies of women (Helena Normanton, Mithan Tata, Mary Stott, Maude Royden) featured in the exhibition from law, journalism and the Church as well as contextual information. This can be used for comprehension exercises or topic information for the ‘changing role’ of women in British Society. Please note it prints at A3 but can be sized down.