Hero image

EduCare's Safeguarding and Duty of Care Resources

Average Rating5.00
(based on 1 reviews)

EduCare's simple to use online learning service provides all staff, volunteers and governors with the opportunity to expand and strengthen their knowledge in over 40 areas of duty of care – covering safeguarding, compliance, health and safety, and wellbeing. Written in partnership with leading experts, these free resources are excerpts taken from EduCare's broad portfolio of courses and online resources and are not designed as teaching resources, but for you to support children and young people

EduCare's simple to use online learning service provides all staff, volunteers and governors with the opportunity to expand and strengthen their knowledge in over 40 areas of duty of care – covering safeguarding, compliance, health and safety, and wellbeing. Written in partnership with leading experts, these free resources are excerpts taken from EduCare's broad portfolio of courses and online resources and are not designed as teaching resources, but for you to support children and young people
What is Mental Health?
educarefreeresourceseducarefreeresources

What is Mental Health?

(0)
Often when we talk about mental health, people immediately think of the negative aspects of certain mental health disorders, such as depression or self-harm. But just like physical health, people can have good mental health or have problems that they need help to overcome. It is important to remember that EVERYONE has mental health; we may be at different places on the continuum but we all have mental health. When working with children and young people, we will recognise that some young people are better able to stick to the positive end of the continuum than others. In this resource we look at the different types of mental health problems and disorders and the common issues faced by children and young people.
What is Self Harm?
educarefreeresourceseducarefreeresources

What is Self Harm?

(0)
Self-harm is when somebody intentionally damages or injures their body. One in 12 young people self-harm and it is usually in response to emotional distress. A person may use physical pain as a way of distracting themselves from emotional pain, giving them temporary relief. Self-harm can become habit-forming and a familiar and normal way to respond to life’s difficulties. The individual may have initially felt temporary relief when they self-harmed because they felt in control of the situation, but this is often followed by shame and guilt which causes the cycle to begin again. This guide will help you to understand why a person self-harms and discover ways to support them
What are the signs and symptoms of poor mental health?
educarefreeresourceseducarefreeresources

What are the signs and symptoms of poor mental health?

(0)
There are many signs and symptoms to look out for that may indicate a child or young person is struggling with their mental health. Every young person is different so it is important to think about each as an individual. This resource looks at how to spot the signs that a young person is struggling with mental health and also includes some guidance about how to make a difference
Supporting children and young people with anxiety
educarefreeresourceseducarefreeresources

Supporting children and young people with anxiety

(1)
Anxiety disorders are the most commonly diagnosed mental health condition. When a young person is feeling anxious there are a number of signs and symptoms which they may experience both physically and psychologically. It is not surprising that the Coronavirus epidemic is causing increased levels of anxiety in children and young people, particularly those who already struggle with their own mental health. In this resource we look at different types of anxiety, signs and symptoms to help find ways to support children if they are experiencing anxiety.
Digital Resilience
educarefreeresourceseducarefreeresources

Digital Resilience

(0)
Digital resilience is understanding when you may be at risk online, knowing what to do if something goes wrong, learning from your experiences of being online, and being able to recover from any difficulties or upsets. This resource looks at how social media use can impact on children and young peoples’ wellbeing and mental health and provides some guidance on how you can help.
Supporting children and young people with loneliness
educarefreeresourceseducarefreeresources

Supporting children and young people with loneliness

(0)
Loneliness is not always visible, but there can be wide-ranging effects on both physical and mental health. It is perfectly possible to be on your own and not feel lonely, and equally possible to be surrounded by people and feel very lonely. People from any background can feel lonely at any time of their lives. We often associate it with the elderly, but children and young people can also become lonely and isolated. In this resource we look at what loneliness means and how it can affect children and young people; we also look at ways to help overcome loneliness.
Prioritising Mental Wellbeing Around Pupils
educarefreeresourceseducarefreeresources

Prioritising Mental Wellbeing Around Pupils

(0)
Now, more than ever before, young people are highly prone to experiencing a mental health disorder. This was confirmed by a recent NHS digital report into the mental health of young people in the UK, which uncovered significant mental health challenges in young people. As an educator you may have an important role in identifying the signs and symptoms of poor mental health in your students and helping them to find the support they need. If you suspect a student has mental health issues, it’s important to reach out and offer support as soon as possible. This resource will help you recognise some of signs and symptoms of mental health in young people and give you some guidance on how to help them.