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The RS and P4C Specialist

Average Rating2.97
(based on 40 reviews)

I am curreny teaching across the Key Stages as the Head of Religious Studies in a comprehensive secondary school. Previously I have led a RS department in an inner-city school and also taught Humanities including experience of teaching Geography at KS3, as well as History at KS3 and KS4 and Sociology at KS5. I'm a Religious Studies and Philosophy specialist, having studied Philosophy at university and taught RS at KS3, KS4 and KS5.

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I am curreny teaching across the Key Stages as the Head of Religious Studies in a comprehensive secondary school. Previously I have led a RS department in an inner-city school and also taught Humanities including experience of teaching Geography at KS3, as well as History at KS3 and KS4 and Sociology at KS5. I'm a Religious Studies and Philosophy specialist, having studied Philosophy at university and taught RS at KS3, KS4 and KS5.
The Chartists
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The Chartists

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NEW KS3 History curriculum on British Reforms following the NEW 1-9 grading criteria. This lesson focuses on the Reform Act of 1832 and how this led to the People's Charter in 1838. Students explore the divergent attitudes of Moral Force Chartism and Physical Force Chartism and have the opportunity to write a speech from either viewpoint to support an equal society. This lesson builds analytical skills and allows students a creative way of investigating the changes to voting laws in the UK through the use of De Bono's hats as the platform for deeper questioning. All tasks are clearly differentiated and this lesson is suitable for all abilities.
Do ghosts exist?
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Do ghosts exist?

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A KS3 Religious Studies lesson, using an enquiry based approach to learning and based on beliefs in the paranormal as a way to explore belief in the afterlife. Following the 2018 Berkshire SACRE agreed syllabus with a focus on exploring the principles of ‘believing, belonging and behaving’ in a religious and secular context. This is lesson 1 of the topic ‘Do you only live once?’ Students start by considering why some people believe in an afterlife and use the stimuli of several video clips to consider what evidence there might be for life after death. Students then complete a diamond 9 activity about reasons why people might believe in ghosts, followed by applying the belief in ghosts to theist, atheist and agnostic belief systems.
Voting Reforms between 1850 and 1900
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Voting Reforms between 1850 and 1900

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NEW KS3 History curriculum on British Reforms following the NEW 1-9 grading criteria. This lesson focuses on four key voting Reforms from 1850 to 1900 and asks students to compare these to the People's Charter. The Reforms Acts covered are from 1867, 1872, 1884, 1885 and students get a chance to analyse and evaluate how far each Reform made an impact on gaining more equality for men and how they link to the campaign for universal suffrage outlined in the People's Charter of 1938. The plenary is designed to stretch and challenge students of all abilities, by asking them to create 5 quiz questions about Reforms and then swap with a partner and take someone else's quiz. All tasks are clearly differentiated and this lesson is suitable for all abilities.
Who is God?
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Who is God?

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A KS3 Religious Studies lesson, using an enquiry based approach to learning and based on Christianity as a way to explore belief in God. Following the 2018 Berkshire SACRE agreed syllabus with a focus on exploring the principles of ‘believing, belonging and behaving’ in a religious context and secular context. This is lesson 2 of the topic ‘What do I believe’. Students are hooked into the lesson by listening to Joan Osborne’s ‘What if God was one of us’ and then explore the Christian belief about the nature of God. The key question for this lesson is’ What is God’s most important characteristic?’
Where did we come from?
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Where did we come from?

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A KS3 Religious Studies lesson, using an enquiry based approach to learning and based on Christianity as a way to explore belief in God. Following the 2018 Berkshire SACRE agreed syllabus with a focus on exploring the principles of ‘believing, belonging and behaving’ in a religious and secular context. This is lesson 4 of the topic ‘What do I believe’. Students engage with the Christian creation story and comparing it to the Big Bang theory and evolution. The key question for this lesson is; ‘Are science and religion compatible?’ leading to a discussion about why science makes people question belief in God.
Jeremy Bentham's Utilitarianism
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Jeremy Bentham's Utilitarianism

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A lesson suitable for GCSE or A-level Philosophy and Ethics to introduce Jeremy Bentham and his concept of Hedonism in moral decision making. Includes an introduction to the notions of Teleology, Utility and happiness in Utilitarian morality. Includes a 'peer teach' activity which always goes down extremely well with students - I usually choose the most able students in a class to become 'teachers' and ask them to relate the information to the rest of the class in groups, which then rotate from teacher to teacher every few minutes. (NOTE: at GCSE this PPT will take 2 lessons of 60 minutes, whereas A-level students normally manage in 1). There are also 3 moral dilemmas for students to apply Bentham's ideas to which engages even the most dis-disillusioned students.
The origin and value of human life
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The origin and value of human life

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NEW GCSE Edexcel Religious Studies specification lesson on the origin and value of human life. A Diamond 9 task starter introduces students to the evidence for the theory of evolution. Two video clips, one from the Simpsons and one from the film Noah to compare and contrast evolution to the Christian creation story. Sources of wisdom and authority allow students to suggest the value and origin of human life as presented in Genesis. This lesson includes an information sheet with Creationist, Conformist and Non-conformist Christian perspectives on creation and the problems posed by evolution linked to an exam style question with a mark scheme for self-or peer assessment.
Comparing Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism
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Comparing Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism

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NEW 2018 AQA Religious Studies Specification ‘A’ lesson on ‘Buddhist Beliefs and Teachings’ following the 1-9 grading criteria. The lesson includes differentiated tasks for every activity, designed to stretch and challenge all students. Students investigate and compare some of the main features of Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism including differences regarding; sunyata, Buddhahood, the five aggregates, kamma and nibbana. This can be done through a carousel task, or peer teaching, with students being asked to take notes from the information sheet. Students then use their knowledge to create a poster outlining the key differences between the two types of Buddhism, with particular emphasis on the concept of 'self' and 'enlightenment'. The spinning plenary wheel, allows for a random plenary from a selection of 8.
Where does evil come from
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Where does evil come from

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A Philosophy for Children lesson focusing on the nature of evil and suffering, including the concept of both moral and natural evil and evaluating the Christian concept of God as omni-benevolent.
The purpose of worship and prayer for Christians
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The purpose of worship and prayer for Christians

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NEW 2016 Religious Studies KS3 curriculum lesson on the purpose of worship and prayer for Christians. The lesson is based around the Lord's prayer as a source of wisdom and authority and introduces the concepts of liturgical and non-liturgical worship. Students are also introduced to the difference between worship and prayer through video clips from 'Chuck knows Church' which offer an engaging and student friendly introduction to the two. Quotes from the Bible ask students to suggest what kind of relationship Christians hope to achieve with God through worship and prayer. This allows a fantastic opportunity to stretch and challenge the more able students.
The nature and importance of Church for Christians
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The nature and importance of Church for Christians

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NEW 2016 Religious Studies KS3 curriculum lesson focusing on the nature and importance of Church in Christianity. A lesson based around visual stimulus with plenty of video clips from www.request.org.uk and exploring the concept of Church as a community of Christian. Excellent modern examples of what Church could be for young Christians, with an opportunity for students to use sources of wisdom and authority and reflect on SMSC. A piece of extended writing and peer assessment is used for students to apply their knowledge. Has gone down a storm with all ranges of ability, who have responded well to the videos.
Christian views on gender prejudice and discrimination
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Christian views on gender prejudice and discrimination

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NEW GCSE Edexcel RS specification. A lesson focusing on Christian attitudes to prejudice and discrimination, leading into a discussion on divergent Christian denominations and their views on women playing a leading role in the Church. There is a practice exam question built in at the end of the lesson for students to examine both sides of the argument for women as Church leaders.
Hinduism Revision Quiz
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Hinduism Revision Quiz

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A quiz about Hinduism with 5 rounds of 6 questions each, covering; history, religion, culture, worship and deities. A fantastic visual and competitive revision tool for all Key Stages covering the main aspects of the religion to engage and stimulate all learners. Can also be used as a refresher activity or an introduction to the topic. With KS3 this should take a full 60 minute lesson. With KS4 and KS5 plan for 20-30 minutes max.
Introduction to Morality and Ethics
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Introduction to Morality and Ethics

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An introductory lesson to morality and ethics revolving around 5 contentious moral issues, which students are asked to respond to through discussion. A very engaging lesson that motivates all students to participate and promotes debating skills. In my experience, this works best when students can discuss each issue in groups before feeding back to the class and allowing different groups to go into short 'head-to-head' debates. Alternatively, this works very well in a P4C format, where each student is given a set amount of contribution tokens for the lesson and has to 'pay' for every contribution and can then no longer contribute when they are out of tokens. This really forces students to consider when to put forward their view.
The Pesach (Passover) festival
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The Pesach (Passover) festival

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A KS3 lesson investigating the history behind the Jewish festival of Pesach (Passover) and asking students to explore why it is still central in Judaism today. The main task is a peer-teach, with student teachers teaching groups of students who circle from teacher to teacher. I usually choose high ability students to be peer teachers (five are needed for this lesson). There is a work sheet for the students to fill in as they visit each peer teacher. The lesson also introduced the Seder plate and finishes with a creative De Bono task of writing a diary entry from the perspective of a modern day Jew.
The Buddha's Enlightenment
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The Buddha's Enlightenment

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NEW 2018 AQA Religious Studies Specification ‘A’ lesson on ‘Buddhist Beliefs and Teachings’ following the 1-9 grading criteria. The lesson includes differentiated tasks for every activity, designed to stretch and challenge all students. Students are asked to interpret the meaning of sacred writing from Jataka vol. 1, p.71 and consider how the Buddha used meditation to reach enlightenment. They then explore the significance of the 'three watches' before applying their learning to a GCSE type exam question, with scaffolding provided, as well as a student friendly mark scheme, which can be used for self- or peer-assessment.
What is a belief?
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What is a belief?

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A KS3 Religious Studies lesson, using an enquiry based approach to learning and based on Christianity as a way to explore belief in God. Following the 2018 Berkshire SACRE agreed syllabus with a focus on exploring the principles of ‘believing, belonging and behaving’ in a religious context and secular context. This is lesson 1 of the topic ‘What do I believe’ and asks students to differentiate between fact, opinion and belief and apply this to a discussion about theism, atheism and agnosticism. The key question for the lesson is; ‘Is it reasonable to believe in God in the 21st Century?’.
The Teachings of Jesus
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The Teachings of Jesus

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GCSE lesson on the teachings of Jesus, including focus on the 'Sermon on the Mount' and the importance of Jesus' sacrifice. Follows the 'NEW' Edexcel GCSE specification.
PEEL writing structure
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PEEL writing structure

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Excellent revision tool to use with GCSE and A-level students to stretch them in their written work and improve paragraph fluency, particularly in Humanities subjects.
Did God make the world
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Did God make the world

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A Philosophy for Children lesson suitable for KS3, exploring the concept of philosophy and facilitating independent thinking about the origins of the universe. Key words: God, Looking for God, who is God, did God make the world, philosophy, what is philosophy, the universe, who created the universe, the nature of God, KS3, RE, beliefs and values,