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Truependous Science

Science resources to teach the objectives as set out in the National Curriculum. The resources focus on getting children actively engaged in their learning and scientific enquiry.

Science resources to teach the objectives as set out in the National Curriculum. The resources focus on getting children actively engaged in their learning and scientific enquiry.
Living things and their habitats - Classification (grouping of plants) for KS2 and KS3 science
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Living things and their habitats - Classification (grouping of plants) for KS2 and KS3 science

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In this fourth lesson pupils should be taught to: Explore possible ways of grouping flowering plants and non-flowering plants. Recognise plants can be grouped into categories such as flowering plants (including grasses) and non-flowering plants, such as ferns and mosses Identify different trees by observing differences in their leaves. Use simple keys to identify leaves from local trees. The following summary is based on notes and guidance from the National Curriculum. The pupils will be classifying living things and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions, discussing their findings with peers and the staff. The teaching method ‘snowball fight’ could be used to gain an understanding of the students current knowledge about different plant species. The pupils have the opportunity to group and classifying living things, carrying out simple comparisons using a simple table and fact sheet and by investigating a local wildlife area / forrest school area. The students can then use the facts in their tables to complete the Venn diagrams. They can also be given the chance to work independently by finding out more facts using secondary sources of information. In this lesson students were split into small groups to investigate the outdoor area / plant species. Each group was either led by a teacher / TA or by an able student to make the activity more engaging and to make sure the table contains all the facts needed for the next activity. The table named indentifying different plants and the plants themselves can be used as a stimulus to talk about criteria for grouping, sorting and classifying. They should begin to look for naturally occurring patterns and relationships between plants that share similar features. Pupils should explore possible ways of grouping a wide selection of living things that include plants. The students can use their plant identification tables or the fact sheets to complete the Venn diagrams and classification keys. They have been designed to allow pupils to identify differences between plant groups easily and the activities should flow, the differences between plant groups written in the Venn diagrams can be used in the boxes of the ‘yes’ / ‘no’ identification keys. The Venn diagrams are a resource to assess the pupils knowledge and for them to record the similarities and differences between different plant groups. The activities have been specifically designed to provide the scaffolding needed for pupils to put plants into groups Pupils are given scientific words to read and opportunities to spell scientific vocabulary correctly to build their confidence and to use their growing spelling knowledge in a scientific context. The word list, phonetic sounds and definitions have been provided which could be used during their weekly spelling test. The students will record their findings using simple scientific language and by completing keys and tables.
Living things - Classification (grouping of animals / vertebrates) for KS2 and KS3 science
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Living things - Classification (grouping of animals / vertebrates) for KS2 and KS3 science

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In this first lesson pupils should be taught to: • Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways • Use a keys, tables and diagrams to help group animals • Identify and name a variety of living things from their local and wider environment The following summary is based on notes and guidance from the National Curriculum. The pupils will be classifying living things and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions, discussing their findings with peers and the staff. Instead of using written methods discussion could also be assessed through an activity like question, feeling, learning. The pupils have the opportunity to group and classifying living things, carrying out simple comparisons using Carroll diagrams and Venn diagrams. They can also be given the chance to work independently by finding out more facts using secondary sources of information. In this lesson sweets have been used to make the activity more engaging. I also like to make use of secondary resources with more information such as top trumps cards including deadliest predators, creatures of the deep and deadly 60. The resources can be used as a stimulus to talk about criteria for grouping, sorting and classifying. They should begin to look for naturally occurring patterns and relationships between animals that share similar features. Pupils should explore possible ways of grouping a wide selection of living things that include animals. The Carroll diagrams, classification key and Venn diagrams has been designed to allow pupils to identify differences between vertebrate groups. The Venn diagrams are a resource to assess the pupils knowledge and for them to record the similarities and differences between different vertebrate groups. The activities have been specifically designed to provide the scaffolding needed for pupils to put vertebrate animals into groups such as fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Pupils are given scientific words to read and opportunities to spell scientific vocabulary correctly to build their confidence and to use their growing spelling knowledge in a scientific context. The word list, phonetic sounds and definitions have been provided which could be used during their weekly spelling test. The students will record their findings using simple scientific language and by completing keys and tables.
Reproduction - becoming pregnant for KS3 and KS4 Biology (Science)
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Reproduction - becoming pregnant for KS3 and KS4 Biology (Science)

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The lesson is designed to teach fertilisation, implantation and structures of the foetus to students in KS3 and KS4 following guidance from the National Curriculum. The first activity is designed to gauge the current knowledge and understanding of the students from KS2. Some students may be able to identify the egg is fertilised in the oviduct. Students may be able to identify the umbilical cord and placenta. If students have completed the lessons about reproducton - reproductive organs some students may be able to identify the egg is fertilised in the oviduct. The objectives have been separated in to three tiers developing, securing and exceeding. The objective sheet can be used by the student and teacher to monitor the performance against each objective as a learning outcome. The National Curriculum states that reproduction in humans (as an example of a mammal) must be taught to students and needs to include fertilisation, gestation and birth, also to include the effect of maternal lifestyle on the foetus through the placenta. A worksheet has been provided and the students can be given the diagrams of the stages of fertilisation through to implantation. An activity like peer discussion can be used, where the students work in pairs to check and discuss whether the other student has ordered the diagrams in the same way. Students can complete the missing words to describe the stages. If printing is an issues the activity can be used with white boards. The students write down the numbers 1 to 6 and then order the pictures using the letters A to F. Using white boards, students can be given immediate feedback and their misconceptions can be addressed straight away. Activities have been included to build scientific literacy by making the students complete the keywords to describe the process of fertilisation. A low order cognitive thinking skills activity has been produced where the students use the images provided to produce a model of the foetus and the key structures in the uterus. The students can use the model to identify the different structures surrounding the embryo. The higher order thinking skills activity allows the students to make links between the feature and its function developing the foetus. The securing activities are designed to build the foundations for knowledge required for the GCSE course. The activity about the fertilised egg dividing is a precursor to the knowledge required for normal cell division (mitosis) in GCSE Biology. One activity answers the questions students usually have about the difference between identical and non-identical twins. A venn diagram could be used to clearly show the similarities and differences between the two processes.
Living things and their habitats -Classification (grouping of invertebrates) for KS2 and KS3 science
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Living things and their habitats -Classification (grouping of invertebrates) for KS2 and KS3 science

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In this first lesson pupils should be taught to: • Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways • Use a keys, tables and diagrams to help group animals • Identify and name a variety of living things from their local and wider environment The following summary is based on notes and guidance from the National Curriculum. The pupils will be classifying living things and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions, discussing their findings with peers and the staff. Instead of using written methods, discussion could also be assessed whilst the students complete the grouping of invertebrate and vertebrate table to gain an understanding of their knowledge. A snowball activity could be used where one pupil remains by their work and the other moves around the room. The student that stays can discuss why they have placed each animal either in the vertebrate column or the invertebrate column. The pupils have the opportunity to group and classifying invertebrate species by observing and recording the features of a range of invertebrate species. I like to take the students to an area on the school grounds where they can collect and observe living organisms. The students can use pooters to prevent harm to the organisms and use small containers with holes to collect them for their observations in the classroom. Magnifying glasses are another good resource to use, so the students can observe the organisms in more detail. They can complete the garden detectives sheet and the fact files sheet during the investigation or when they return to the classroom. The students can also be given the chance to work independently by finding out more facts using secondary sources of information which have been provided. The resources can be used as a stimulus to talk about criteria for grouping, sorting and classifying. They should begin to look for naturally occurring patterns and relationships between animals that share similar features. Pupils should explore possible ways of grouping a wide selection of vertebrate species using the classification key. The Venn diagrams are a resource to assess the pupils knowledge and for them to record the similarities and differences between different invertebrate groups. There is one for a summary that gets the students to compare invertebrates and vertebrates. The activities have been specifically designed to provide the scaffolding needed for pupils to discover invertebrate groups such as snails, slugs, worms, spiders and insects The students will record their findings using simple scientific language and by completing keys and tables.
A model of human teeth for the unit animals including humans KS2 science
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A model of human teeth for the unit animals including humans KS2 science

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This activity has been made to accompany a lesson for the unit animals including humans. It can be used to produce a model of the human teeth and identify the different teeth found in the human mouth. It can also be used to provide the basic idea of the shapes of each tooth to produce a model out of modeling clay or plasticine. This model is quick to make and only requires scissors and glue. The model is anatomically correct and based on a real set of teeth.
Reproduction - Reproductive organs and gametes for KS3 and KS4 Biology (Science)
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Reproduction - Reproductive organs and gametes for KS3 and KS4 Biology (Science)

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The lesson is designed to teach reproductive organs and gametes to students in KS3 and KS4 following guidance from the National Curriculum. The first activity is designed to gauge the current knowledge and understanding of the students from KS2. Some students may be able to identify the egg cell, sperm cell and name the process of fertilisation. If students have completed the lessons about cells, they may be able to identify the cells are all specialised cells found in the human body. The objectives have been separated in to three tiers developing, securing and exceeding. The objective sheet can be used by the student and teacher to monitor the performance against each objective as a learning outcome. The National Curriculum states that reproduction in humans (as an example of a mammal) must be taught to students and needs to include the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems. A worksheet has been provided and the students can be given the diagrams of the male and female anatomy and use the arrows to identify the different structures. An activity like snowballing can be used, where the students walk around the room from station to station and see whether other students have labeled the diagrams in the same way. Students can leave feedback on post it notes to help address misconceptions or simply correct the errors by moving the arrows. The students must also be able to identify the structure and function of gametes. A low order cognitive thinking skills activity has been produced where the students identify the different parts of the male and female gametes. The higher order cognitive thinking skills activity allows the students to make links between the feature (adaptation) of the cell and its function. Activities have been included to build scientific literacy by making the students define the keywords and use them in sentences. A video has been embedded which describes the process of fertilisation and the questions can be used alongside the clip to maintain focus on the key points. After the clip the activity ‘define the keywords’ could be used to summarise the process of ejaculation to implantation of the fertilised egg. The higher order thinking skills (exceeding objectives) include causes of reproduction problems, reasons between different specialised cells from different organsims and suggesting functions of specialised cells based on their appearance and adaptations. The activity adapations of animal cells links well to this unit and the students should predict the function based on special features. It also gives the opportunity to recap knowledge from the cells topic. The process of re-visiting the work from a previous unit helps the students to recall more facts over time as seen by the research by Ebbinghaus learning curve. The following lesson will detail the process of fertilisation and becoming pregnant and include the effect of maternal lifestyle on the foetus through the placenta.
Living things and their habitats - producing simple Identification keys for KS2 and KS3 science
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Living things and their habitats - producing simple Identification keys for KS2 and KS3 science

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In lesson five pupils should be taught to: Re-cap ways to compare and contrast vertebrate groups Explore possible ways of grouping animals by making simple keys The following summary is based on notes and guidance from the National Curriculum. The pupils will be classifying living things and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions, discussing their findings with peers and the staff. The teaching activity ‘tabletennis’ could be used to allow students to discuss scientific terminology before comparing and contrasting using the Venn diagram. The students decide on two animals or are given two pictures of animals, they then state a key word / feature of the animal in turns until one person can’t go. The person who spoke last gains a point or wins the table tennis rally. The pupils have the opportunity to group and classifying living things, carrying out simple comparisons using Haribo Phantasia sweets or the pictures provided. The students can then use the sweets to complete the Venn diagrams and recap their knowledge from the previous lesssons. Covering the same material more than once but in a slightly different way, will enhance learning / retention and is based on work by Ebbinghaus on learning curves. The students can also be given the chance to work independently by finding out more facts using secondary sources of information. In this lesson students were given the Haribo Phantasia sweets and allowed time to group the sweets into different categories based on the knowledge gained in the previous lessons. The sweet sort activity, identifying different animals features and adaptations can be used as a stimulus to talk about criteria for grouping, sorting and classifying. They should begin to look for naturally occurring patterns and relationships between plants that share similar features. Pupils should explore possible ways of grouping a wide selection of living things that include animals. The students can use their work from Venn diagrams and classification keys. They have been designed to allow pupils to identify differences between plant groups easily and the activities should flow, the differences between plant groups written in the Venn diagrams can be used in the boxes of the ‘yes’ / ‘no’ identification keys. The Venn diagrams are a resource to assess the pupils knowledge and for them to record the similarities and differences between different plant groups. The activities have been specifically designed to provide the scaffolding needed for pupils to put plants into groups Pupils are given scientific words to read and opportunities to spell scientific vocabulary correctly to build their confidence and to use their growing spelling knowledge in a scientific context. The word list, phonetic sounds and definitions have been provided which could be used during their weekly spelling test. The students will record their findings using simple scientific language and by completing keys and tables.
Living things - Adaptations of animals (identifying features of vertebrates) for KS2 and KS3
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Living things - Adaptations of animals (identifying features of vertebrates) for KS2 and KS3

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In this second lesson pupils should be taught to: • Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways • Use a keys, tables and diagrams to help group animals • Identify and name a variety of living things from their local and wider environment The following summary is based on notes and guidance from the National Curriculum. The pupils will be classifying living things and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions, discussing their findings with peers and the staff. Instead of using written methods discussion could also be assessed through a snowballing activity, one student stays at the station and describes their ideas to other students as they rotate around the classroom. The pupils can use the animal adaptation card sort to classifying vertebrate groups focusing on their features. The pupils can use the card sort activity if their knowledge of animals is limited, alternatively be provided with the blank table and prompts if there knowledge is more in depth. The pupils carry out simple comparisons using Venn diagrams to compare and contrast different animals with certain features. This builds upon the knowledge learned in lesson one and will reinforce how classification of different animals with backbones can be performed. This uses Ebbinghaus pedagogy theory about memory and current scientific research that repetition of the material in a different context or activity will aid memory retention. The resources can be used as a stimulus to talk about criteria for grouping, sorting and classifying. They should begin to look for naturally occurring patterns and relationships between animals that share similar features. The animal habitats activity can be used in conjunction with the animal cards. The students decided where the animals would live based on their features (adaptations). The activity gives the opportunity to describe / justify why they have decided each animal would be found in that habitat based on its features. The last activity involves the use of Venn diagrams, they have been designed to allow pupils to compare and contrast animals based on their adaptations. These diagrams focus on the features of animals and the pupils can place the animal cards or animal pictures in the different regions. To save printing this activity can be used on the board and pupils simply copy the activity int their books. The Venn diagrams are a resource to assess the pupils knowledge and for them to record the similarities and differences and see which animals share certain features.