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KS2, KS3 "The Call of the Wild" fiction extract, crr, comprehension, cover activity, hw, reading
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KS2, KS3 "The Call of the Wild" fiction extract, crr, comprehension, cover activity, hw, reading

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Created for a year 7 class as a homework to go alongside our class reader of 'Love That Dog', this is a comprehension (close reading and response) activity based on the segment from "The Call of the Wild" in which Buck fights Spitz to become top dog. There are 14 questions in total, focusing on vocabulary, inference and the effects of language. This would be a good cover activity or the questions could be used to structure a guided reading session.
AQA GCSE English Literature Power and Conflict Poetry Revision
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AQA GCSE English Literature Power and Conflict Poetry Revision

(11)
My students' mock revealed that they were not planning their answers - and that they hadn't got to grips with the need to compare. This ppt was planned to address both of those weaknesses, asking them to think about the most effective choice of poem for the comparison and trying to encourage them to use a double bubble map as part of their planning.
"An Inspector Calls" Act 1, Stage Directions, close reading, effect, GCSE English Literature
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"An Inspector Calls" Act 1, Stage Directions, close reading, effect, GCSE English Literature

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Prior to using this lesson, my class had watched the BBC adaptation of “An Inspector Calls” so already had knowledge of the plot and a basic understanding of the roles of the characters in terms of Priestley’s intentions. Watching the adaptation first worked really well in my 4/5 target group. This is a short lesson (only 8 slides on the ppt) together with a multiple-choice quiz focusing the students on Priestley’s use of stage directions in “An Inspector Calls”. The aim of the lesson is to draw inferences from Priestley’s stage directions. For more able classes, the multiple-choice quiz could be used prior to the lesson to identify gaps in the students’ understanding so that subsequent teaching can be very precisely focused. With my own class (targets 4 and 5), I used the powerpoint first and then set the quiz as homework for consolidation and a little extension of knowledge. If you find either aspect of this resource useful, I would very much appreciate you taking the time to leave a review.
KS3 "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" Lesson 1, opening, deduce and infer, language and structure
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KS3 "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" Lesson 1, opening, deduce and infer, language and structure

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A powerpoint lesson on the opening of “The Speckled Band”, planned for a middle-ability year 8 class but suitable at any point in KS3. The lesson begins with a settler activity looking at the word ‘axiom’ and drawing an inference about Sherlock Holmes from his maxim. Pupils are then guided through Watson’s opening narration, making inferences from selected evidence. The focus then turns to Helen Stoner whereupon the inference is developed into deduction and pupils’ attention is turned to what can be inferred and deduced from the simile - and how that simile can be linked to other aspects of the description. Finally, pupils are asked to draw an inference from the way in which two paragraphs of the story have been structured.
KS3, KS4, "Mysteries of Udolpho", gothic horror, reading, analysis, CRR, comprehension, cover, hw
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KS3, KS4, "Mysteries of Udolpho", gothic horror, reading, analysis, CRR, comprehension, cover, hw

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Created as a homework task as part of a unit on gothic horror, this would also work as a cover activity. It uses a short extract from “The Mysteries of Udolpho” by Ann Radcliffe and there are 8 questions, most requiring a more extended answer, focusing on analysis. Useful for honing the reading skills that will be tested at GCSE and for exploring a less common text from the genre of gothic horror.
"The Adventure of the Speckled Band" Lesson 2, Characterisation, Evidence, Exploding quotations
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"The Adventure of the Speckled Band" Lesson 2, Characterisation, Evidence, Exploding quotations

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Lesson 2 of a sequence planned for a year 8 class. This lesson focuses on looking closely at evidence to explain characterisation. The lesson is intended to get the pupils to zoom in more closely as the lesson progresses. The focus in the text is the part of the story where Helen Stoner is telling Sherlock Holmes about her family history and introduces information about her stepfather, Dr Roylott. There are prompts (in the form of questions) for the explosion of one quotation; students are then asked to work more independently to explode a second quotation, using the first as a model.
KS3, Charles Dickens, "Great Expectations", Characterisation, Appearance, Symbolism, Close reading
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KS3, Charles Dickens, "Great Expectations", Characterisation, Appearance, Symbolism, Close reading

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Planned as part of a SOW for year 8 - a unit on Charles Dickens with a focus on characterisation - this lesson looks at Pip’s first visit to Satis House (chapter 8 of ‘Great Expectations’) and the first description of Miss Havisham. The aim of the lesson is to infer and deduce from description. Pupils are asked to explore the symbolism of colour, looking at the connotations of the colour used in the description of Miss Havisham. Their attention is drawn to the noun ‘lustre’ - this is used later to model a paragraph of analysis. Teaching strategies used are questioning, paired discussion and modelling.
"An Inspector Calls" - the role of Gerald.
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"An Inspector Calls" - the role of Gerald.

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Planned for a year 10 group all of whom have targets of a grade 5, this ppt leads the students through the presentation of Gerald Croft, up to the exploration of his affair with Daisy Renton. Students are encouraged to think about the method Priestley uses to link Gerald to Mr Birling, one way in which the theme of hypocrisy is explored and the way in which Gerald is used to explore the idea of different attitudes and values across generations.
KS2, KS3, "The Call of the Wild" Jack London, Buck's kidnap, comprehension, crr, reading, hw, cover
knapsterknapster

KS2, KS3, "The Call of the Wild" Jack London, Buck's kidnap, comprehension, crr, reading, hw, cover

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I created this short comprehension activity for my year 7 class to be used alongside their class reader, "Love That Dog". It uses an excerpt from "The Call of the Wild" describing Buck's kidnap. Alongside the extract are ten questions focusing on vocabulary and understanding. This works as a homework but could also be used as a cover activity. Alternatively, the questions could be used to structure a guided reading session.
KS3, KS4, Wordsworth, "Upon Westminster Bridge", close reading, analysis, lesson plus homework
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KS3, KS4, Wordsworth, "Upon Westminster Bridge", close reading, analysis, lesson plus homework

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Created for a year 9 class, this is a lesson on Wordsworth’s “Upon Westminster Bridge” which asks the students to identify the viewpoint expressed in the poem and then explore features of language and structure that help to convey that viewpoint. Also attached here is a multiple-choice quiz that I originally created as a homework to be used after the lesson in order to consolidate the learning.
KS3, Charles Dickens, "Hard Times", Gradgrind, viewpoint, analysis, close reading, using evidence
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KS3, Charles Dickens, "Hard Times", Gradgrind, viewpoint, analysis, close reading, using evidence

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Created for a more able year 8 class, this is a lesson on the description of Gradgrind from the start of “Hard Times”. The aim is to link Dickens’s use of language and structural features to his viewpoint. The lesson is scaffolded so that there is a grid for the pupils to complete explaining what they can infer about Gradgrind from the language used to describe him (there’s also a little bit on the Victorians’ belief that character could be gauged from facial features). After having completed the grid, the pupils then look at the longer excerpt and work more independently on an extended answer - though they can use the structure of their response in the grid to plan and guide that answer.
KS3, KS2, John Masefield, "Sea Fever", poetry, analysis, lang, reading, personification, viewpoint
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KS3, KS2, John Masefield, "Sea Fever", poetry, analysis, lang, reading, personification, viewpoint

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Created for a year 7 class as part of a unit of work on “Treasure Island”, this lesson invites the children to explore Masefield’s poem, “Sea Fever”, identifying the speaker’s attitude towards the sea and focusing on the use of personification and other language features. The lesson uses hinge questions at key points, requiring all children to feed back with one from a choice of answers. In my classroom we use our arms to make letter shapes; you could use mini-whiteboards. At the end of the lesson, the children are asked to produce a written response focusing on Masefield’s use of personification and two other language features of their choice, explaining what’s revealed about the speaker’s attitude towards the sea (and here you could introduce or embed the idea of viewpoint). There is a separate homework available for this lesson which is a series of multiple-choice questions about the poem.
KS3, Charles Dickens, "Oliver Twist" detecting the writer's viewpoint, close reading, baby farming
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KS3, Charles Dickens, "Oliver Twist" detecting the writer's viewpoint, close reading, baby farming

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Planned for a year 8 class but also suitable for year 9, this is a lesson as part of a SOW on Charles Dickens. It asks the pupils to focus on establishing the writer’s viewpoint and begins with some context on the deplorable practice of baby farming. There is an image to generate understanding and ideas, followed by a non-fiction text from Benjamin Waugh (the founder of the NSPCC) in which he exposes and denounces baby farms. This text is studied in two sections. Once the pupils have worked through these texts and got an understanding of context and of viewpoint (Waugh’s writing is highly emotive and very scathing) they are then given an excerpt from “Oliver Twist” describing the parish farm run by Mrs Mann. The lesson culminates with the pupils being asked to identify Dickens’s viewpoint and then explain how the methods that he uses help to communicate that viewpoint. There is paired work and questioning along the way to get the pupils to this point.
KS3, Charles Dickens, "Oliver Twist", Slum, Detecting writer's viewpoint, methods, analysis
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KS3, Charles Dickens, "Oliver Twist", Slum, Detecting writer's viewpoint, methods, analysis

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Planned for a year 8 class, this lesson looks at Dickens’s viewpoint on slums and the methods that he uses to communicate this viewpoint. The lesson begins with a discussion about a modern slum, an introduction to the idea that vocabulary gives an indication about viewpoint and questioning intended to ensure that all pupils have a secure understanding of viewpoint before they begin to look at the extract. The extract used is from “Oliver Twist” as Oliver and his employer (‘owner’), Mr Sowerberry, go into the slums to collect the corpse of a woman. The lesson uses several hinge questions to check crucial points of understanding. Wherever a question is used, the answer is given on the subsequent slide, just for clarity. For some reason, the ppt preview does not appear in the correct order. I will try to get TES to rectify this.
KS3 Charles Dickens, characterisation through setting, "Great Expectations", Miss Havisham, analysis
knapsterknapster

KS3 Charles Dickens, characterisation through setting, "Great Expectations", Miss Havisham, analysis

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Planned for a year 8 class as part of a unit of work on Charles Dickens, this lesson focuses on Dickens’s use of setting for characterisation. The extract used (a short one; printable is on slide 11); prior to that, the pupils are asked to look at the description of the Chocolate Room from ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’, explaining how Dahl’s use of colour suggests the character of Willy Wonka. There is then a focus on concrete nouns and pupils are asked what these suggest about Willy Wonka - what aspect of his personality they might reflect. Having built confidence in this skill, the focus then shifts to the more challenging text - from ‘Great Expectations’. Having gone through some text marking, pupils are then asked to share what they think the setting suggests about Miss Havisham - then pick one aspect of that setting and write up an analytical paragraph. For homework, pupils are asked to describe a room that gives the reader clues as to their own character - describing the room’s colour, temperature, listing at least 3 concrete nouns and mentioning the view from the window.
KS3, "The Adventure of the Speckled Band", ending, writing to express a viewpoint, emotive
knapsterknapster

KS3, "The Adventure of the Speckled Band", ending, writing to express a viewpoint, emotive

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Planned for a year 8 class, this lesson takes as its central idea Holmes’s comment at the end of “The Adventure of the Speckled Band” that, ‘I am no doubt indirectly responsible for Dr. Grimesby Roylott’s death, and I cannot say that it is likely to weigh very heavily upon my conscience.’ After a recap of what’s meant by a noun phrase, pupils are directed to choose adjectives to develop nouns from the story into emotive noun phrases, thereby building a word bank. They then use their word bank in developing Holmes’s sentence into a speech to Watson in which he expands and develops his viewpoint.