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I am a teacher of English and Drama and have worked in a variety of roles - classroom teacher, whole-school G & T co-ordinator (back in the old days!) head of subject and second in faculty. I hope very much that you'll find some of these resources useful to you.

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I am a teacher of English and Drama and have worked in a variety of roles - classroom teacher, whole-school G & T co-ordinator (back in the old days!) head of subject and second in faculty. I hope very much that you'll find some of these resources useful to you.
GCSE Eng Lit, Paper 2, Unseen Poetry, AQA, "The Mower", Philip Larkin, Reading, Analysis,
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GCSE Eng Lit, Paper 2, Unseen Poetry, AQA, "The Mower", Philip Larkin, Reading, Analysis,

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This powerpoint was created for a mixed ability year 10 class to guide them through their response to unseen poetry. Using Larkin's "The Mower", the powerpoint slides have some carefully crafted questions to focus the students' attention on the poet's use of language and structure. To support them with the wording of the question (which asks about the expression of feelings) there is a word bank of feelings, not all of which are relevant, of course, but which should provide them with the vocabulary that they need to explore the poem.
KS3 poetry, KS4 GCSE Unseen Poetry, Maya Angelou, "Woman Work", writer's methods, effect, analysis
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KS3 poetry, KS4 GCSE Unseen Poetry, Maya Angelou, "Woman Work", writer's methods, effect, analysis

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I planned this for KS3 but it would also be a good introduction to the analysis of unseen poetry at GCSE. The chosen text is “Woman Work” by Maya Angelou. The lesson is a 16 slide powerpoint that goes right back to basics in terms of the ideas presented in a poem and the methods that are used to present those ideas. Pupils are asked to name methods that have already been picked out and then to work with a partner to explain the effect of one of those methods. Moving on to the second part of the poem, the pupils are asked to identify and articulate the change that takes place. There is then a focus on the use of imperative verbs and personification in the second part of the poem - and the effect of these, of course! Towards the end of the ppt is a slide which presents the pupils with two paragraphs of a response to the poem and asks them which is the better paragraph - and why. The better paragraph can then be used as a model. The intention of the lesson is to prepare the pupils for a homework task which is to answer the question: How does the writer present the speaker’s ideas about her life in the poem.
"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, the nature of Puck, Lesson 1.
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"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, the nature of Puck, Lesson 1.

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This ppt introduces Puck with a focus on his pranks and the way he describes them to another fairy. There is opportunity for discussion and a short drama activity where the pupils freeze-frame one of the pranks and can be thought-tracked (this is drama that can easily be managed within the classroom). The lesson ends with the setting of a homework which is the creation of a wanted poster for Puck (the final slide is a template for this wanted poster).
KS2, KS3, "War Horse", onomatopoeia, writing poetry, creative writing, animals at war
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KS2, KS3, "War Horse", onomatopoeia, writing poetry, creative writing, animals at war

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Planned for a year 7 class who were entering a poetry creative writing competition, this lesson focuses on writing using onomatopoeia to evoke the experience of an animal at war. The lesson begins with some discussion about the role of animals in warfare. Then the focus turns to an extract from “War Horse” and there are three questions to focus pupils on the effect of Morpurgo’s writing here. Having seen how Morpurgo uses onomatopoeia (and other strategies) to evoke the experience of war for an animal, the pupils are then given the story of Jack, a terrier who served on the Western Front during the first World War. They are then asked to write a poem about Jack’s experiences, using onomatopoeia. Though planned for KS3, this would work at KS2 and would be be effective alongside a reading of Morpurgo’s novel.
AQA, GCSE Eng Lang, Paper 1, q 4, evaluation, "The Woman in the Window", walkthrough, reading
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AQA, GCSE Eng Lang, Paper 1, q 4, evaluation, "The Woman in the Window", walkthrough, reading

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Created for my year 11 class for use before their February mock exam, this lesson is a walkthrough of question 4 (the most demanding question on the paper and worth almost half of the reading marks) which tests the skill of evaluation. The ppt provides the students with a list of evaluative adverbs with which they can structure their response if they wish and also uses the mark scheme to reinforce the message that they must use the bullet points of the question to guide them towards a complete answer. The text used is the opening of "The Woman in the Window" by A.J.Finn and the question asks the students to focus on the depiction of the story's narrator, evaluating the extent to which she is an unlikeable character. One ppt slide is a cue to model the first paragraph of the response. For more able students, the model may not be required.
KS3, War Poetry, Anthem for Doomed Youth, Wilfred Owen, PEE, analysis, reading, close reading
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KS3, War Poetry, Anthem for Doomed Youth, Wilfred Owen, PEE, analysis, reading, close reading

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Created for a mixed ability year nine class, this powerpoint takes the pupils through the poem, initially with a focus on Owen's redrafting - what is the effect of 'doomed youth' rather than the initial 'dead youth'. Throughout the lesson the pupils are asked to consider the effect of Owen's language choices. There is a multiple-choice question focusing on the simile 'who die as cattle'. In our classroom, we respond by using our arms to make the letters, YMCA-style. The question could as easily be answered using mini whiteboards. The lesson takes the pupils through a model paragraph of response focusing on the effect of the 'as cattle' simile; they're then asked to produce a further three paragraphs working independently. Useful as a reading assessment or as part of a unit of work on war poetry. The intention is that this lesson begins to embed the skills on which the pupils will be tested at GCSE.
KS3, KS2, Alex Rider, Spies, 'Scorpia', crr, comprehension, cover, hw, guided reading, analysis
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KS3, KS2, Alex Rider, Spies, 'Scorpia', crr, comprehension, cover, hw, guided reading, analysis

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Created as a homework task for a year 7 group, this could also work at the top end of KS2. It uses a short excerpt from “Scorpia” by Anthony Horowitz in which Alex Rider is fighting for his life against a sword wielding adversary. There are ten questions focusing on the effect of the writer’s methods. Useful for homework or as a cover activity, this task could also be used to structure a guided reading session.
KS3, KS4, non-fiction reading, language, structure, effect, analysis, Marathon des Sables, lesson hw
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KS3, KS4, non-fiction reading, language, structure, effect, analysis, Marathon des Sables, lesson hw

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I planned this for a year nine class as part of a unit of work on non-fiction, specifically journeys. The lesson uses a recount text by Mark Hines who has run the Marathon des Sables and guides the pupils through the spotting and then the analysis of various language and structural features. Once they have read the full text, they are then asked to provide all the elements of a P.E.E response but in grid format. Pupils who don’t need the scaffolding of the grid could be asked to write their response in prose. The homework task is a second recount of the Marathon by a female runner with some multiple choice questions intended to consolidate pupils’ reading skills. Though planned for KS3, this could also be used with KS4 students who are in need of practice when it comes to their reading of non-fiction.
"The Flowers", Alice Walker, Short Story, Comprehension, CRR, Genre, Analysis, Homework, Cover
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"The Flowers", Alice Walker, Short Story, Comprehension, CRR, Genre, Analysis, Homework, Cover

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I've used this for both year 9 and year 10 classes. This worksheet uses a complete short story by Alice Walker, "The Flowers", which is really useful for teaching in conjunction with "Strange Fruit", "Still I Rise" and "Of Mice and Men". Briefly, the story tells of a young girl, Myop, who stumbles across a dead body and gradually comes to the realisation that the dead man was the victim of a lynching. The questions are intended to make the pupils aware of the story's message and the metaphor of the summer ending at the end of the story. Questions also focus on the genre (fairy tale) of the story and the effect of Walker having written in this genre. Useful as a pre-reading homework so that pupils' responses can be discussed and understanding clarified in the lesson. An incredibly powerful story, this, which has never failed me and which is brilliant for helping the children develop their skills both of analysis and of inference.
KS3, Roald Dahl, "The Landlady", Reading Skills, Inference, Prediction
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KS3, Roald Dahl, "The Landlady", Reading Skills, Inference, Prediction

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Planned for my year 9, mixed ability class the aim of the lesson is: to use structure, language and genre to infer. The third slide gives a link to a pdf, printable version of the story in case you do not have a copy of it in your school. The lesson guides the pupils through the reading of the story, stopping at various points for discussion and for consolidation of ideas so far about character, leading to prediction. Good for developing reading skills, particularly those of inference. Also good to remind the pupils to support their ideas with references to the text.
KS3 reading skills, analysis, explaining effect of language, PEE, creepy writing, commenting, impact
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KS3 reading skills, analysis, explaining effect of language, PEE, creepy writing, commenting, impact

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Planned for my year 7 class after their in-school exam had revealed that while they can select writing that is creepy and, in most cases, name the specific language feature that makes the writing creepy, they find it very difficult to explain WHY the writing is creepy, commenting on the impact on the reader. This lesson takes them through and is intended to build their skills of explaining. First, they're asked to explain why a picture is creepy, next, they're asked to find the evidence while an extract is read to them and then they have to complete a PEE grid. The lesson then asks them to write up their thinking from the grid in PEE paragraphs. For the most able, there is a final slide encouraging them to use specific words (like 'connotation') in their response. When I used this with my own year 7 group, it did provide responses that significantly improved on their exam answers.
KS4, AQA GCSE Eng Lang, paper 2, question 2, question 3, CHILDHOOD, inference, synthesis, language
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KS4, AQA GCSE Eng Lang, paper 2, question 2, question 3, CHILDHOOD, inference, synthesis, language

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Planned for my year 11 class, whose mock exam had revealed weaknesses in their approach to English Language paper 2, this lesson uses two texts about childhood - Henry Mayhew’s description of the watercress girl and an abridged extract from the Guardian - ‘Living Dolls’ about child beauty pageants. The lesson begins by using images to help the students hone their skills of inference and synthesis. Moving onto question 3, the lesson uses the mark criteria to reinforce for the students the shape and content of their response. The intention is that the students will write their response to question 2 in class and will work on the response to question 3 for homework.