AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 Fiction Walkthrough "Midwich Cuckoos" extract

AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 Fiction Walkthrough "Midwich Cuckoos" extract

Planned for my year tens as an introduction to the requirements of paper 1, this powerpoint takes them through questions 1, 2 and 3. The requirements of each question are explained and there are references to the mark scheme throughout. Question 4 is set for homework and the last slide is a self-assessment grid for the students to use for self/peer marking and target setting to improve their question 4 response.
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KS4, GCSE Unseen Poetry

KS4, GCSE Unseen Poetry

Various resources including complete lessons, homework tasks and worksheets, all useful in preparing your students for the GCSE, unseen poetry task.
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GCSE, Eng Lit, Modern Texts, "An Inspector Calls", dramatic irony, foreshadowing, Titanic, structure

GCSE, Eng Lit, Modern Texts, "An Inspector Calls", dramatic irony, foreshadowing, Titanic, structure

A lesson that I created for my mixed ability year ten class, ensuring that they embed the knowledge of what's meant by dramatic irony and then guiding them to look at how Priestley uses that dramatic irony for foreshadowing with a focus on the use of Birling's assertions about Titanic. There is a brief reference to 'Of Mice and Men' with the explanation of foreshadowing (asking the students why George is often seen to play Solitaire); this could be removed if your students haven't previously read Steinbeck's novel - and replaced with a reference to any novel or film that uses foreshadowing. At the end of the lesson, the students are asked to spend ten minutes writing to explain what the Titanic is used to foreshadow in the play.
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KS4, GCSE, AQA English Language Paper 1, Fiction, Question 2 Language, Question 3 Structure

KS4, GCSE, AQA English Language Paper 1, Fiction, Question 2 Language, Question 3 Structure

Created for a year 11 class after a disappointing performance in an early mock exam, this lesson uses a short extract (shorter than they'd get in the 'real thing' ) and takes the students through question 2, analysing the effects of language features and question 3, analysing the effects of structural features. It is very much a walk-through intended to focus the students very precisely on what's required for each question. The lesson should take about an hour and there are two opportunities for the students to spend ten minutes or just over writing their own, independent responses to questions 2 and 3. For less able students, the differentiation could take the form of extending the time allowed to complete the questions or asking for some paired writing in response.
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KS3, KS4, reading, fiction, "Goldfinger", connotation, semantic field, analysis, effect of feature

KS3, KS4, reading, fiction, "Goldfinger", connotation, semantic field, analysis, effect of feature

Planned for a year 9 literacy class to introduce some of the key skills that they will need at GCSE, this lesson uses an excerpt from Ian Fleming's "Goldfinger" and the lesson guides the pupils through an exploration of connotation which is then developed into the idea of the semantic field and the effect of this structural feature on a reader. The pupils are given sentence stems to help develop the skill of analysis though of course the slide with the sentence stems could easily be removed to add a greater level of challenge (or the sentence stem slide could be printed out and given only to those children who require more differentiation). This lesson could also be used with less able KS4 pupils at the start of their GCSE course.
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AQA English Language Paper 2 question 4, non fic, viewpoints perspectives, 2 lesson walkthrough,

AQA English Language Paper 2 question 4, non fic, viewpoints perspectives, 2 lesson walkthrough,

Here are two ppt lessons and two non-fiction texts. The two texts are both travel writing, one pre-twentieth century in which David George Hogarth (1862-1927) describes Eastern hospitality as demonstrated by some Yuruk nomads at Patara in South West Turkey. The companion text is from "The Guardian" and it's the novelist Jason Godwin describing the attractions of Istanbul. The first lesson is based on the Hogarth text and the focus is on identifying the writer's viewpoint and linking that to the methods used to communicate that viewpoint. The first lesson culminates in an exam-style task which uses much of the wording from question 4 but which doesn't yet require the comparison. The second lesson aims to consolidate and build on the first. It introduces the modern text, recaps some of the learning about methods and then guides the students through a model of the first paragraph of comparison, reintroducing the Hogarth text from the previous lesson. The idea is that the teacher will elicit the model answer from students via questioning and will write the paragraph on the board. The penultimate slide is the top band of the mark scheme against which the students should check the model. Assuming that they then have the criteria from the mark scheme at the forefront of their minds, the students then use the modelled first paragraph to write a further two paragraphs of the comparison.
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"Macbeth" Act 1, scene 7, GCSE, English Literature, homework, cover, multi-choice quiz, pre-reading

"Macbeth" Act 1, scene 7, GCSE, English Literature, homework, cover, multi-choice quiz, pre-reading

I created this as a homework task for my GCSE class. It focuses on Act 1, scene 7 of "Macbeth" and there are sixteen multiple-choice questions focusing on language and theme. This could be used to embed knowledge after the scene has been covered in class or, for more able children, could be used as a pre-reading activity to enable the teacher to steer the lesson so that it focuses on any gaps.
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KS4, GCSE, Shakespeare, "Romeo and Juliet", entire teaching sequence, 27 planned teaching hours

KS4, GCSE, Shakespeare, "Romeo and Juliet", entire teaching sequence, 27 planned teaching hours

This is my SOW on "Romeo and Juliet". It is intended that the teaching sequence will begin with your showing, in its entirety, a film version of the play. The powerpoints here comprise at least 27 teaching hours (one or two of the ppts, though planned for an hour's lesson, were extended over two) and cover every scene of the play, though not every word. The lessons are numbered as part of the ppt names, though they have not uploaded in the correct order - sorry about this! I planned this for a mixed-ability class though without any high flyers (the top target in the group is a six; overall, targets range from 3 to 6). The lessons use recapping and hinge questions and try to ensure that each scene is seen as part of the whole text. You'll notice there are some multiple-choice, hinge questions. In my classroom, the children create the letters, YMCA-style, but you can elicit their ideas in your own way! The ppts are intentionally plain so that they're easily editable for differentiation up and down. Some of the ppts mention multiple-choice quizzes for homework. These will be available separately when I've uploaded them (hopefully before Christmas).
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KS3, KS4, structure, close reading, "The Damned United", analysis.

KS3, KS4, structure, close reading, "The Damned United", analysis.

I created this for a year nine literacy group as part of a scheme of work to introduce and embed the skills that they will need for AQA GCSE English Language. It focuses on the opening extract of David Peace's "The Damned United" and the main focus for the analysis is on the structural features of repetition and contrast. The lesson concludes with a grid for the pupils to complete - just to help them to structure their answer. This grid won't be necessary for students who have already done some work on structure but it is a useful way in if this is an early lesson on the skill. The ppt is very plan and unadorned so that it will be easy for you to edit and tweak to suit the needs of your own class. The ppt mentions showing the class the opening of the film - the link is not on the ppt but the link to the clip is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeNG-cj52rg (It's a montage of Leeds in their 70's glory days).
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AQA, GCSE English Language, Paper 2, writers' viewpoints and perspectives, question 2, inference

AQA, GCSE English Language, Paper 2, writers' viewpoints and perspectives, question 2, inference

Planned for my year 11 class after their mock exam had revealed that they hadn't remembered that the key skill tested on this question is inference rather than summary, this powerpoint takes them right back to basics, starting with the mark scheme, developing the skills of inference and contrasting via a look at two images (images chosen to chime with the texts) and then looking at drawing inferences from two texts about poverty. The first (19th century) text is an excerpt from George R.Sims' "How the Poor Live" and the second is from a modern blog by Kathleen Kerridge.
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KS3, KS4, Wordsworth, "Upon Westminster Bridge", close reading, analysis, lesson plus homework

KS3, KS4, Wordsworth, "Upon Westminster Bridge", close reading, analysis, lesson plus homework

Created for a year 9 class, this is a lesson on Wordsworth's "Upon Westminster Bridge" which asks the students to identify the viewpoint expressed in the poem and then explore features of language and structure that help to convey that viewpoint. Also attached here is a multiple-choice quiz that I originally created as a homework to be used after the lesson in order to consolidate the learning.
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KS4, GCSE, writer's viewpoint, exploring tone and other methods, "Boy with the Top Knot", analysis

KS4, GCSE, writer's viewpoint, exploring tone and other methods, "Boy with the Top Knot", analysis

I created this for a GCSE class studying AQA English Language. It's intended as preparation for paper 2, question 4, although this focuses only on one text. The focus of the lesson is on identifying the writer's viewpoint and then explaining how that viewpoint is conveyed, first of all by identifying the writer's tone and then by looking at other methods used in the writing. The text used is "The Boy with the Top Knot" by Sathnam Sanghera.
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KS3, KS4, war poetry, Sassoon, "Attack", reading, analysis, declaration, context, viewpoint. Inc h/w

KS3, KS4, war poetry, Sassoon, "Attack", reading, analysis, declaration, context, viewpoint. Inc h/w

Created for a year nine class, this lesson takes the pupils through Sassoon's declaration with a focus on viewpoint and then, knowing his viewpoint, the pupils are invited to explore the poem "Attack". The ppt utilises the g & t strategy of asking the pupils to formulate questions to match answers that they are given. They then have to work independently to select another language feature or structural feature used in the poem and compare this to the writer's viewpoint as conveyed in the declaration. There is a Word document which is a multiple-choice quiz handy for homework, for consolidating the learning of the lesson.
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Pirates, CRR, comprehension, guided reading, KS3, zombies, scary, horror, tension, fear, cover, hw

Pirates, CRR, comprehension, guided reading, KS3, zombies, scary, horror, tension, fear, cover, hw

I made this as a homework task for my year 7 class to sit alongside the work that we were doing in class on Stevenson's "Treasure Island". It might also be suitable for KS2 (though it is a little gory in its prediction of what the zombies will do to Karim once they break though the door; you might wish to abridge that paragraph for more sensitive readers). There are six reading questions, focusing on inference and the seventh task asks the children to write the next six sentences of the story - with a focus on varying their openers. This task is suitable for homework (which was its original function) but would also work as a cover activity.
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KS4, GCSE, AQA, English Language, Paper 2, reading, walkthrough of questions 1, 2, 3, 4, revision

KS4, GCSE, AQA, English Language, Paper 2, reading, walkthrough of questions 1, 2, 3, 4, revision

I created this for my current year 11 class (targets between 3 and 6) as a walkthrough prior to their mock exams. It uses two texts about homelessness - a really inspiring story (from "The Guardian" about a Big Issue seller and an extract from Dickens's "The Uncommercial Traveller". It's a lengthy powerpoint and if you want to teach it as I did - getting the students to work independently on each question - then it will take more than one lesson. The ppt provides a model answer for question 2 and a couple of sample paragraphs for question 3, inviting the students to discuss them and decide which is the better response and why. In my teaching, having outlined the requirements for question 4, we completed a whole-class model of the first paragraph on the board and I set the rest for homework, though of course it could all be finished in class, depending on how much time you have available. I hope that you and your students will find this useful. NB. For some reason, the preview seems to be showing the slides in the wrong order! The ppt takes the students through the questions chronologically so why the mark scheme for question 4 appears before the model for question 2, I do not know. This doesn't happen when you view the whole ppt.
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KS3, Dickens, structural features, analysis of effect, "Nicholas Nickleby", saving Smike, GCSE skill

KS3, Dickens, structural features, analysis of effect, "Nicholas Nickleby", saving Smike, GCSE skill

I created this for a more able year 8 class as an introduction to the GCSE skill of analysing structural features. The lesson uses a lengthy extract from "Nicholas Nickleby" in which Squeers begins to beat Smike and Nicholas comes to the rescue. The lesson is scaffolded so that the pupils are asked to identify close-up in the text, guided towards noticing repetition and then asked to spot contrast. The lesson culminates in a writing task in which the pupils are asked to explore the effect of each of these features; the extension is for them to select a further structural feature.
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GCSE Eng Lit, Unseen Poetry, Blake, "The Sick Rose", walkthrough of answer, exam prep, reading

GCSE Eng Lit, Unseen Poetry, Blake, "The Sick Rose", walkthrough of answer, exam prep, reading

Created for a mid to low ability, this lesson asks the students to explore Blake's "The Sick Rose" as a poem presenting ideas about love. Before the students are asked to write an independent response to an exam-style question, they are given three minutes and a list of very specific questions focusing on the writer's methods. The idea is that they have a fast and focused discussion and try to answer as many of the questions as possible. This will furnish them with a starting point for their own answer. With a weaker class, the questions could be used for whole-class discussion - or the answers could be used as a scaffold for a model, whole-class answer. In my own teaching, I found that this works well for students who are still tentative when it comes to approaching the unseen poetry task. For those schools embedding the skills for GCSE in year 9, this lesson is also suitable for embedding those skills of poetry analysis at KS3.
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KS4, AQA, paper 2, writers' viewpoints and perspectives, non-fiction, qu.3, effect of lang, analysis

KS4, AQA, paper 2, writers' viewpoints and perspectives, non-fiction, qu.3, effect of lang, analysis

Created for my year 11 class, this lesson uses an extract from Rory Stewart's "The Places In Between" and has a close focus on question 3 - the "How does the writer use language to ..." question. The lesson is fundamentally a walk-through, linking the requirements of the students' answers very closely to the mark scheme. The lesson ends by asking the students to work independently in order to write their own response to the question. There is a homework available separately which is a multiple-choice quiz on a second extract from Rory Stewart's book.
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KS3 KS4 non-fiction, close reading, analysis, language features, homework, cover, identifying gaps.

KS3 KS4 non-fiction, close reading, analysis, language features, homework, cover, identifying gaps.

I created this for a key stage 4 class to go alongside a lesson where the text was an excerpt from Rory Stewart's book "The Places in Between". This was originally intended as a homework activity to ask the students to read a second excerpt and have a brief look at features of language and structure. It could also be used as a starter to identify gaps in key knowledge before exploring the text (or a different section from the book, which is well worth reading) in more depth and detail. This resource has the extract from the book as well as 11 multiple-choice quiz questions.
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"Great Expectations" opening, multi-choice quiz, homework, starter, cover, analysis, naming features

"Great Expectations" opening, multi-choice quiz, homework, starter, cover, analysis, naming features

Created for a year 8 class as a homework activity, this uses the segment very near the start of 'Great Expectations' where Pip is in the churchyard and Magwitch appears. There are 18 multiple-choice questions intended to focus the pupils on Dickens's use of language features and structural features, embedding their use of subject-specific vocabulary and encouraging them to begin to think about the effect of these features. This could be used as a long starter to identify gaps in pupils' knowledge, as a homework or cover activity or for close reading. The questions could even be used to scaffold a group-reading activity.
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"Midsummer Night's Dream", Leon Garfield, prose, close reading, quiz, homework, cover

"Midsummer Night's Dream", Leon Garfield, prose, close reading, quiz, homework, cover

Created for my year 7 class as a homework to form part of their work on Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream", this uses a very brief excerpt from Leon Garfield's prose version of the story, reproduced below. There are 14 multiple choice questions with a focus on language features (though there is a question on the structural feature of repetition, too) and this could form a scaffold for guided reading - once the features have been identified the children could then be asked to explore in more depth the effect of these features - a starter to identify gaps in knowledge or (as originally intended) a homework. The short extract is here: "It was a strange wood, as huge, dark and mysterious as a man's mind. It was haunted - and by more than spinning spiders, beetles, hedgehogs and softly gliding, spotted snakes. There were other personages who flickered among the shadows, darted across moonbeams, hung in the beating air and pursued mysterious affairs of their own."
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