AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 Fiction Walkthrough "Midwich Cuckoos" extract

AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 Fiction Walkthrough "Midwich Cuckoos" extract

Planned for my year tens as an introduction to the requirements of paper 1, this powerpoint takes them through questions 1, 2 and 3. The requirements of each question are explained and there are references to the mark scheme throughout. Question 4 is set for homework and the last slide is a self-assessment grid for the students to use for self/peer marking and target setting to improve their question 4 response.
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KS4, GCSE Unseen Poetry

KS4, GCSE Unseen Poetry

Various resources including complete lessons, homework tasks and worksheets, all useful in preparing your students for the GCSE, unseen poetry task.
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GCSE, Eng Lit, Modern Texts, "An Inspector Calls", dramatic irony, foreshadowing, Titanic, structure

GCSE, Eng Lit, Modern Texts, "An Inspector Calls", dramatic irony, foreshadowing, Titanic, structure

A lesson that I created for my mixed ability year ten class, ensuring that they embed the knowledge of what's meant by dramatic irony and then guiding them to look at how Priestley uses that dramatic irony for foreshadowing with a focus on the use of Birling's assertions about Titanic. There is a brief reference to 'Of Mice and Men' with the explanation of foreshadowing (asking the students why George is often seen to play Solitaire); this could be removed if your students haven't previously read Steinbeck's novel - and replaced with a reference to any novel or film that uses foreshadowing. At the end of the lesson, the students are asked to spend ten minutes writing to explain what the Titanic is used to foreshadow in the play.
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KS3, KS4, poetry, Romantics, dramatic monologue, Browning "The Laboratory", writer's methods, effect

KS3, KS4, poetry, Romantics, dramatic monologue, Browning "The Laboratory", writer's methods, effect

This is a lesson planned for an able year 9 class as part of a unit on poetry and developing the skills that they’ll need for GCSE. It uses Browning’s “The Laboratory” and there is a focus, through questioning, on the methods that the writer uses to suggest the character of the speaker in the poem. At the end of the lesson, the pupils are asked to focus independently on two further methods (alliteration and contrast) and explain their effect in the context of developing the character of the speaker. There is a brief mention of the fact that Browning was influenced by the Romantic poets and the homework after the study of the poem is for the pupils to write an extended paragraph (perhaps bolstered by independent research) about the attitude of the Romantics to the French Revolution.
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AQA GCSE Eng Lang, Paper 1, Question 1, Question 2, "Career of Evil", reading, exam prep

AQA GCSE Eng Lang, Paper 1, Question 1, Question 2, "Career of Evil", reading, exam prep

Created for a year 11 class in the run-up to their English Language GCSE, this looks at the first two questions on paper 1 (reading fiction) and focuses on questions 1 and 2. The focus on question 1 is pretty brief as it is the most accessible question. It asks the students to identify which of two responses is best in order to clear up any misconceptions about the demands of this question. The focus then moves to question 2 where the powerpoint requires a whole-class model that is structured to meet the bullet points of the mark scheme. The model is of the first paragraph of the response; the students are then asked to use the structure and format of that model to write the next two paragraphs of their answer.
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AQA GCSE Eng Lang Paper 2 Non Fiction Question 3 Language Analysis Effect Homework WAVE

AQA GCSE Eng Lang Paper 2 Non Fiction Question 3 Language Analysis Effect Homework WAVE

Planned for a year 11 class after a disappointing outcome in the mock, this lesson focuses on the skills tested in English Language Paper 2, question 3 (commenting on the effect of language). The lesson uses a very short (only 2 paragraphs) excerpt from an article from the ‘Financial Times’ about a surfing accident. Students are reminded of the criteria for marks and the powerpoint uses some of the comments from the report by the Chief Examiner. Students are then asked to work independently to complete their own answer after which there is an opportunity for peer assessment. There is a homework task which uses an abridged extract from a ‘Guardian’ article about a tsunami in Japan in 2011 and which asks the students to embed the skills they’ve developed in the lesson by answering a second, similar question.
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KS3 Poetry

KS3 Poetry

This is a bundle of lessons and resources (some suitable for cover and homework) all suitable for pupils at KS3. Many are also suitable for KS4, particularly for introducing those skills that are needed for the analysis of unseen poetry.
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KS4, AQA, GCSE Eng Lang, Turkey, Istanbul, Viewpoints, Perspectives, Question 4, Compare, Methods

KS4, AQA, GCSE Eng Lang, Turkey, Istanbul, Viewpoints, Perspectives, Question 4, Compare, Methods

Planned for a year 11 class, this uses a challenging non-fiction text by David George Hogarth recounting his travels in South West Turkey against Jason Godwin’s modern description of visiting Istanbul. There are two lessons. The first focuses on the methods used by a writer to convey his viewpoint and the text used is the more challenging, older text. The second lesson introduces the comparative text and takes the students through a model paragraph of comparison which is then assessed against the mark scheme before the students embark independently on the rest of the comparison. For more able students, or those who have already been introduced to this question, you may find that you can combine the two lessons into one.
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KS3, KS2 Poetry, "Rain", Shel Silverstein, symbolism - good link to "Holes" by Louis Sachar

KS3, KS2 Poetry, "Rain", Shel Silverstein, symbolism - good link to "Holes" by Louis Sachar

This is a short and simple lesson with the aim: explain the effect of rain as a symbol. Demonstrate understanding through writing. The poem used is Shel Silverstein’s “Rain”. The lesson begins with a hinge question to assess what pupils already understand about symbolism. There are then two questions (best used in a sort of pitch-pause-pounce-bounce kind of way) which ask how rain could be used as a symbol in two different contexts, that of a funeral and that of a desert. The lesson then introduces Silverstein’s poem and points out that it can be read on two levels, both as a nonsense poem for children but, with more depth, with the rain as a symbol. Pupils are asked to explain what they think the rain could symbolise, and why. I planned this to work alongside Louis Sachar’s novel “Holes” though it would work as a stand-alone lesson or as part of a unit on poetry.
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"Countdown" Grace Chua, CRR, comprehension, analysis, reading, unseen poetry, hw, cover

"Countdown" Grace Chua, CRR, comprehension, analysis, reading, unseen poetry, hw, cover

Created for a year 9 class as a homework to help them build their skills of talking about an unseen poem, this would also work at KS4, either as a scaffold for pupils to develop their ideas prior to writing an exam response, as a structure for guided reading or as a homework or cover activity. It uses Grace Chua’s poem “Countdown” and there are 11 questions focusing on the effects of language and structure. There is an exam-style question before the comprehension questions to remind the pupils of the overarching question that they need to hold in their mind.
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KS3, KS4, Unseen Poetry, "Brothers" by Andrew Forster, questioning, pair work, written response.

KS3, KS4, Unseen Poetry, "Brothers" by Andrew Forster, questioning, pair work, written response.

This is a straightforward lesson planned for a year 9 class as part of a unit about transition to GCSE. That said, it would also work as an early lesson on the response to unseen poetry for a KS4 class. The lesson uses the poem “Brothers” by Andrew Forster. The first six slides are intended for class discussion and to elicit shared ideas. When I taught this, I gave out the complete poem at slide 7 (which also serves as the printable slide to furnish you with your copy of the poem). After slide 7, the intention is that the pupils should work through the next four slides in pairs, without sharing their answers, so that they are furnished with some ideas for their written response without having been given the answers on a plate! This lesson does not provide a detailed analysis of the poem as the intention is that the pupils will come up with this themselves, using the questions as a steer.
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Andrew Marvell "To His Coy Mistress", KS3, KS4, writer's methods, purpose, analysis

Andrew Marvell "To His Coy Mistress", KS3, KS4, writer's methods, purpose, analysis

Planned for a year 9 class to introduce the skills that will be needed at KS4 and introduce them to an important poem, this lesson has 15 slides and the aim is to link the writer’s methods to the speaker’s purpose in the poem. This would work as an introduction to Marvell’s poem which, let’s face it, deserves more than one hour’s study. The lesson recaps what’s meant by a writer’s methods, focuses on Marvell’s ‘If…But…Therefore’ structure of argument, uses questioning to look closely at two lines (‘Time’s winged chariot’ and ‘skin like morning dew’). The lesson then opens out to look at the flattery used in the first part of the poem and then explores other strategies that can be used to persuade (the use of threat and logic). The lesson culminates in the pupils being asked which strategy for persuasion they consider most effective and why. To conclude, they write a P.E.E paragraph in response to that previous question.
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KS3, KS4, Poetry, unseen, "Love Song With Two Goldfish", cover, h/w, quiz, close, guided reading

KS3, KS4, Poetry, unseen, "Love Song With Two Goldfish", cover, h/w, quiz, close, guided reading

I created this for my year 11 class as a homework task to help embed and develop their skills in tackling an unseen poem. That said, it could also be used in class at KS3 or KS4. The multiple-choice quiz could provide a structure for a guided reading session or could be used ‘cold’ at the start of a session to identify gaps in pupil knowledge and understanding so that subsequent teaching can be more precisely focused and targeted. The poem itself is absolutely charming but does contain a wealth of methods that can be unpicked and analysed in some detail.
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AQA GCSE Eng Lang Paper 1 Fiction Question 3 Structure "The One Man" Questioning Discussion

AQA GCSE Eng Lang Paper 1 Fiction Question 3 Structure "The One Man" Questioning Discussion

Created for a year 11 class in the run-up to their GCSE exams this summer, this is a 13-slide powerpoint using the opening from the novel “The One Man”. The lesson begins with questioning and a recap on what we mean by the ‘effect’ on a reader. There is then a sequence of questions on the effect of various structural features at work in the first two paragraphs of the text. The text is then read in full after which the students are asked to spend a short time in paired work before tackling an exam-style question. The response is not modelled; the intention is that the students will draw on what they’ve gleaned from the questioning and discussion for their own answers. Of course, modelling the start of the answer could be a differentiation strategy with a less confident class.
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"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Oberon, Titania, supported judgement, viewpoint, use evidence, reading

"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Oberon, Titania, supported judgement, viewpoint, use evidence, reading

I created this for a year 7 class. It’s intended be taught after we’ve met Puck and the Fairy who’ve had their conversation ending, “But room, Fairy, here comes Oberon…And here my mistress. Would that he were gone!” The lesson recaps that and asks the pupils to consider what they can infer from Puck and the Fairy’s lines. The focus then moves to Oberon and Titania. Images are used to ask the children to consider their visual characterisation. The lesson then uses a short excerpt from Leon Garfield’s prose recount of the story and asks the children to look at their characterisation in the same way as they did for the images (effectively, the images are used to scaffold the reading of the Garfield extract). Having formed an impression of Oberon and Titania, there is then some questioning designed to prompt and test understanding. Finally, the children are asked to explore the dialogue between the King and Queen of the fairies where they accuse each other of adultery. Children are asked to decide which character is the WORST and to provide evidence to support that viewpoint. The powerpoint does not specify whether this response should be verbal or written as there are opportunities here for differentiation.
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KS4, KS3, Unseen Poetry, Jimmy Santiago Baca, "I am offering this poem", hw, starter, guided reading

KS4, KS3, Unseen Poetry, Jimmy Santiago Baca, "I am offering this poem", hw, starter, guided reading

This is a multiple-choice quiz on Jimmy Santiago Baca’s “I am offering this poem”. There are 18 multiple-choice questions focusing on language and the poem’s message. I originally created this as a homework task for a GCSE class who needed more exposure to a range of unseen poetry. That said, I have also used it with another class as a pre-teaching activity to identify gaps in students’ knowledge and understanding so that subsequent teaching could be more precisely focused on the needs of the students. The structuring of the multiple-choice questions is also intended to provide a structure for a guided reading session. For more able pupils, the answer options need not be given but they might be useful as support for less confident readers.
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KS3, KS2, "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Act 2 s.1, Puck, typical atypical fairy, reading, writing

KS3, KS2, "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Act 2 s.1, Puck, typical atypical fairy, reading, writing

This is a lengthy powerpoint created for a year 7 class which stretched across two hour-long lessons but which is easy to shorten or extend. The focus is on Act 2, scene 1 of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” where Puck describes himself and his pranks to another fairy. The lesson aim is to describe someone who’s typical and establish whether Puck is a typical example. The description of a typical fairy comes through the writing of a whole-class acrostic poem and then an individual cinquain (models of both are provided). The lesson then moves on to look at Puck’s conversation with the fairy and there is a multiple-choice quiz which could be completed in pairs or individually. Once the pupils have completed the quiz, the lesson then moves on to a close focus on the scene and the children are asked to compile a table explaining which aspects of Puck’s behaviour are typical of a fairy and which are less expected. There is a second multiple-choice quiz which could be set as homework to consolidate the learning of the lesson. You won’t see all the pages in the preview so please be aware that the quiz for use in the lesson is in Comic Sans and the homework quiz is in Calibri!
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AQA GCSE Eng Lang Paper 2 Question 4 compare writers' viewpoints and perspectives on betting

AQA GCSE Eng Lang Paper 2 Question 4 compare writers' viewpoints and perspectives on betting

This is a lesson planned for a year 11 class to try to help them embed understanding of what’s required for question 4 on paper 2 and to develop the reading skills that are tested through that question. The extracts used are both about gambling: Victoria Coren Mitchell writing in the “Guardian”, criticising fixed odds betting terminals and James Greenwood writing “The Wilds of London” (1874). The text from “The Guardian” is abridged but not simplified; the Greenwood text is unaltered. The lesson explores perspective and how it affects viewpoint, reminds students of what we mean when we talk of a writer’s methods and uses a double bubble graphic organiser to plan a response.
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AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 resources

AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 resources

This is a bundle of resources to support the teaching of the reading questions on paper 1 of AQA English Language. Some lessons focus on a single question; others walk through all four questions. The total value of the bundle is £17
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