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I am a teacher of English and Drama and have worked in a variety of roles - classroom teacher, whole-school G & T co-ordinator (back in the old days!) head of subject and second in faculty. I hope very much that you'll find some of these resources useful to you.

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I am a teacher of English and Drama and have worked in a variety of roles - classroom teacher, whole-school G & T co-ordinator (back in the old days!) head of subject and second in faculty. I hope very much that you'll find some of these resources useful to you.
KS3, Charles Dickens, "Bleak House", reading, analysis, multi-choice quiz, h/w, cover, lang features
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KS3, Charles Dickens, "Bleak House", reading, analysis, multi-choice quiz, h/w, cover, lang features

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Created for my year 8 class as a homework activity to tie in with a SOW on Charles Dickens (extract based) this takes the opening of "Bleak House" and asks 15 multiple-choice questions focusing on vocabulary and the effect of language features (there's one question on the structural feature of repetition). Could be used as a pre-reading homework prior to a lesson in which Dickens' style is explored in greater depth or as a homework intended to get the pupils to read a greater range of Dickens' writing.
KS3, "The Tempest", Act 1, scene 2, Prospero and Caliban, inference, langauge, close reading, P.E.E
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KS3, "The Tempest", Act 1, scene 2, Prospero and Caliban, inference, langauge, close reading, P.E.E

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Created for a mixed-ability year 8 class, this lesson focuses on Prospero's confrontation with Caliban and uses two, short speeches: Caliban's "When thou camest here first..." and Prospero's "Hag-seed, hence!" The key focus is on inference and the lesson begins by asking the pupils to write three similes based on what they've been able to infer from an image. Hopefully, this will embed their understanding of what's meant by the skill of inference which they then go on to apply to the two, short excerpts from the play. Caliban's speech is analysed verbally (though slide 7 can be printed off and stuck into exercise books if this part of the lesson needs to be formalised). The focus then switches to Prospero's speech. The pupils are guided through a verbal analysis of the effect of Prospero's imperatives and repetition and are then asked to write four paragraphs in response to this question: What do Shakespeare’s language and structural features reveal about Prospero’s relationship with Caliban? With my class, the expectation was that the pupils would write their first two paragraphs on the effect of the imperatives and repetition, having had the verbal model, and then go on to write more independently. With weaker groups, the verbal modal could instead be written on the board. For greater challenge, the modelling could be omitted altogether.
GCSE Eng Lang, Reading, Susan Hill, "The Mist in the Mirror", Analysis, Language Features, Effect
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GCSE Eng Lang, Reading, Susan Hill, "The Mist in the Mirror", Analysis, Language Features, Effect

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Created for my year 10 mixed ability set for homework, this uses an early extract from "The Mist in the Mirror". There are three tasks and each one has a section of differentiation beneath it. Of course, the differentiation sections are intended to be deleted for more able students. The first task asks the students to name language features (the differentiation is that the definition of each feature is provided); the second task asks the students to identify the mood created by each feature, looking at connotations in each case (the differentiation is an explanation of connotation) and the third task asks the students to comment on the effect of the repetition in the first three paragraphs (the differentiation is an explanation of the kind of thing they might explore when talking about 'effect'). This task did seem to help my lot make progress on their work towards paper 1 of the AQA English Language exam.
GCSE Eng Lit, Unseen Poetry, Blake, "The Sick Rose", walkthrough of answer, exam prep, reading
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GCSE Eng Lit, Unseen Poetry, Blake, "The Sick Rose", walkthrough of answer, exam prep, reading

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Created for a mid to low ability, this lesson asks the students to explore Blake's "The Sick Rose" as a poem presenting ideas about love. Before the students are asked to write an independent response to an exam-style question, they are given three minutes and a list of very specific questions focusing on the writer's methods. The idea is that they have a fast and focused discussion and try to answer as many of the questions as possible. This will furnish them with a starting point for their own answer. With a weaker class, the questions could be used for whole-class discussion - or the answers could be used as a scaffold for a model, whole-class answer. In my own teaching, I found that this works well for students who are still tentative when it comes to approaching the unseen poetry task. For those schools embedding the skills for GCSE in year 9, this lesson is also suitable for embedding those skills of poetry analysis at KS3.
KS3, KS4, Sensory Writing, Quiz, Nigel Slater, Winter, Food, multiple-choice, pre-reading, homework
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KS3, KS4, Sensory Writing, Quiz, Nigel Slater, Winter, Food, multiple-choice, pre-reading, homework

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Created for my KS4 class (who don't read enough non-fiction independently) the multiple-choice quiz at the end is intended to ensure that they've read the text! It could also be used for a cover activity or as a pre-reading homework to embed knowledge of language features. The text itself is a superb example of sensory writing so once the quiz has been completed it could be used as a model for the students to complete their own writing about a favourite season and its associated food. The text is also accessible for pupils at KS3.
"Goosebumps" Halloween bundle!
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"Goosebumps" Halloween bundle!

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As we approach Halloween and children start getting tired, what better than a bundle of “Goosebumps” tasks to inspire independent reading, structure guided reading tasks, encourage prediction and further creative writing or dig down into text and focus on some world-level analysis. These are comprehension based but could be extended into a range of less old-school activities! Useful if you want to plan a sequence focusing on one writer or genre.
KS3, KS4, non fiction, Steinbeck, "Harvest Gypsies", comprehension, crr, cover, homework.
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KS3, KS4, non fiction, Steinbeck, "Harvest Gypsies", comprehension, crr, cover, homework.

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Created for a group to read alongside their study of “Of Mice and Men”, this is an excerpt from John Steinbeck’s “Harvest Gypsies” newspaper articles, published in the thirties. There are ten questions, focusing on the writer’s methods and their effect. The task could be used in class, for a cover lesson, set as homework or the questions could help to structure a guided reading activity.
KS3, KS4, "Hound of the Baskervilles", Conan Doyle, reading, crr, comprehension, cover, homework
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KS3, KS4, "Hound of the Baskervilles", Conan Doyle, reading, crr, comprehension, cover, homework

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This is a short and simple worksheet focusing on the scene from “The Hound of the Baskervilles” in which Holmes, Watson and Sir Henry Baskerville approach Baskerville Hall. There are four (short) sets of questions on vocabulary, information retrieval, inference and explanation of the writer’s methods. I created this as a cover activity but it would work for homework or even to structure a guided reading session.
KS3, Roald Dahl, "The Landlady", Reading Skills, Inference, Prediction
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KS3, Roald Dahl, "The Landlady", Reading Skills, Inference, Prediction

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Planned for my year 9, mixed ability class the aim of the lesson is: to use structure, language and genre to infer. The third slide gives a link to a pdf, printable version of the story in case you do not have a copy of it in your school. The lesson guides the pupils through the reading of the story, stopping at various points for discussion and for consolidation of ideas so far about character, leading to prediction. Good for developing reading skills, particularly those of inference. Also good to remind the pupils to support their ideas with references to the text.
"The Flowers", Alice Walker, Short Story, Comprehension, CRR, Genre, Analysis, Homework, Cover
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"The Flowers", Alice Walker, Short Story, Comprehension, CRR, Genre, Analysis, Homework, Cover

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I've used this for both year 9 and year 10 classes. This worksheet uses a complete short story by Alice Walker, "The Flowers", which is really useful for teaching in conjunction with "Strange Fruit", "Still I Rise" and "Of Mice and Men". Briefly, the story tells of a young girl, Myop, who stumbles across a dead body and gradually comes to the realisation that the dead man was the victim of a lynching. The questions are intended to make the pupils aware of the story's message and the metaphor of the summer ending at the end of the story. Questions also focus on the genre (fairy tale) of the story and the effect of Walker having written in this genre. Useful as a pre-reading homework so that pupils' responses can be discussed and understanding clarified in the lesson. An incredibly powerful story, this, which has never failed me and which is brilliant for helping the children develop their skills both of analysis and of inference.
"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, the nature of Puck, Lesson 1.
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"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, the nature of Puck, Lesson 1.

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This ppt introduces Puck with a focus on his pranks and the way he describes them to another fairy. There is opportunity for discussion and a short drama activity where the pupils freeze-frame one of the pranks and can be thought-tracked (this is drama that can easily be managed within the classroom). The lesson ends with the setting of a homework which is the creation of a wanted poster for Puck (the final slide is a template for this wanted poster).
KS3 reading skills, analysis, explaining effect of language, PEE, creepy writing, commenting, impact
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KS3 reading skills, analysis, explaining effect of language, PEE, creepy writing, commenting, impact

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Planned for my year 7 class after their in-school exam had revealed that while they can select writing that is creepy and, in most cases, name the specific language feature that makes the writing creepy, they find it very difficult to explain WHY the writing is creepy, commenting on the impact on the reader. This lesson takes them through and is intended to build their skills of explaining. First, they're asked to explain why a picture is creepy, next, they're asked to find the evidence while an extract is read to them and then they have to complete a PEE grid. The lesson then asks them to write up their thinking from the grid in PEE paragraphs. For the most able, there is a final slide encouraging them to use specific words (like 'connotation') in their response. When I used this with my own year 7 group, it did provide responses that significantly improved on their exam answers.