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I am a teacher of English and Drama and have worked in a variety of roles - classroom teacher, whole-school G & T co-ordinator (back in the old days!) head of subject and second in faculty. I hope very much that you'll find some of these resources useful to you.

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I am a teacher of English and Drama and have worked in a variety of roles - classroom teacher, whole-school G & T co-ordinator (back in the old days!) head of subject and second in faculty. I hope very much that you'll find some of these resources useful to you.
KS3, KS2, "The Glass Cupboard", parable, fairy tale, close reading, moral, quiz, hw, cover
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KS3, KS2, "The Glass Cupboard", parable, fairy tale, close reading, moral, quiz, hw, cover

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I made this as a homework task for a year 8 class to be read and completed before a study in class of Dickens's "Prince Bull". It features Terry Jones' "The Glass Cupboard" which is a fairytale parable about environmental responsibility. There are 12 questions which focus on the genre, the idea of a parable, the difference between a parable and a fable and some of the language used in the story. Although this is a simple story, it's a great introduction to the idea of morality tales/parables and could form the basis for a deeper study (as in our classroom, with Dickens). The lesson plan for Prince Bull is also available.
"Beowulf", Seamus Heaney, Fighting Sea Monsters, CRR, multiple-choice quiz, hw, starter, cover
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"Beowulf", Seamus Heaney, Fighting Sea Monsters, CRR, multiple-choice quiz, hw, starter, cover

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This uses a short extract from Seamus Heaney’s “Beowulf” in which Beowulf recounts his battle with sea-monsters. There are then 15 multiple-choice questions. I created this for use with my year 7 class as a homework. However, the questions could be used to steer a guided reading session or as a starter to identify gaps in knowledge so that subsequent teaching can be more precisely focused.
KS3, KS2, "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Act 2 s.1, Puck, typical atypical fairy, reading, writing
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KS3, KS2, "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Act 2 s.1, Puck, typical atypical fairy, reading, writing

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This is a lengthy powerpoint created for a year 7 class which stretched across two hour-long lessons but which is easy to shorten or extend. The focus is on Act 2, scene 1 of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” where Puck describes himself and his pranks to another fairy. The lesson aim is to describe someone who’s typical and establish whether Puck is a typical example. The description of a typical fairy comes through the writing of a whole-class acrostic poem and then an individual cinquain (models of both are provided). The lesson then moves on to look at Puck’s conversation with the fairy and there is a multiple-choice quiz which could be completed in pairs or individually. Once the pupils have completed the quiz, the lesson then moves on to a close focus on the scene and the children are asked to compile a table explaining which aspects of Puck’s behaviour are typical of a fairy and which are less expected. There is a second multiple-choice quiz which could be set as homework to consolidate the learning of the lesson. You won’t see all the pages in the preview so please be aware that the quiz for use in the lesson is in Comic Sans and the homework quiz is in Calibri!
KS3, "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Hermia and Helena, Fight, Analysis, Reading skills
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KS3, "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Hermia and Helena, Fight, Analysis, Reading skills

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Planned for a mixed ability year 7 class, this lesson uses a prose version of the plot and asks the pupils to identify specific features of language and comment on their effect. This lesson develops P.E.E into the R.T.B model (root, trunk, branches - the idea of the branches is that the 'explanation' part of P.E.E is developed and extended). The lesson aim is: comment on the impact of a writer’s language choices on the reader.
KS3, "Wind", Ted Hughes, Poetry, Analysis, PEE, Language, KS4, Unseen Poetry, English Literature
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KS3, "Wind", Ted Hughes, Poetry, Analysis, PEE, Language, KS4, Unseen Poetry, English Literature

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I made this lesson for my lower ability year 8 class. The aim of the lesson is to pinpoint specific words that communicate power and danger and explain why they suggest these ideas. The lesson is intended to enable them to tackle a demanding poem via a more accessible route. They're guided through an exploration of some of Hughes's language when describing the wind with a specific focus on 'flung' and 'wielded'. The pupils are asked to record their idea about the effect of the language in a table and are then asked to respond to this question: In “Wind”, how does Ted Hughes present the wind to the reader? The success criteria for this task are given at the very start of the lesson and then again at the end of the lesson so that the pupils can complete some self-assessment either before handing in the work as a form of proof-reading or instead of teacher marking. This lesson could also be used at KS4 with weaker students who are intimidated by the unseen poetry question for English Literature; it's a gentle way in which will make the students feel as though they have achieved some success.
KS4, GCSE, AQA, Paper 2, question 4, viewpoints, compare, reading, PRISONS.
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KS4, GCSE, AQA, Paper 2, question 4, viewpoints, compare, reading, PRISONS.

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This lesson was planned to introduce the skills for Paper 2, question 4. The lesson uses two short texts on prisons: one from the “Daily Mail” which conveys a (typically) strong point of view; the second is a description from Henry Mayhew, writing in the nineteenth century. Pupils are led step by step through the skills that are tested in paper 2. A grid is used to scaffold the response on the short texts. The idea is that then the longer texts (Alex Cavendish writing in his blog about the experience of visiting prison as an ex-prisoner and Charles Dickens describing Newgate prison) are tackled in the same way, using a grid to ensure that all aspects of the question are tackled in the response. In short, the lesson on the ppt is an extended model after which the students should be using the longer texts (which are of equivalent length to those that’ll be used in the exam) to write their own, independent response.
AQA GCSE English Literature Power and Conflict Poetry Revision
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AQA GCSE English Literature Power and Conflict Poetry Revision

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My students' mock revealed that they were not planning their answers - and that they hadn't got to grips with the need to compare. This ppt was planned to address both of those weaknesses, asking them to think about the most effective choice of poem for the comparison and trying to encourage them to use a double bubble map as part of their planning.
KS3, "The Tempest", Shakespeare, Act 3, scene 1, reading, understanding, love, PEE, card sort
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KS3, "The Tempest", Shakespeare, Act 3, scene 1, reading, understanding, love, PEE, card sort

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For teaching after Act 3, scene 1 has been read through (possibly in pairs, depending on the ability of your pupils). I originally planned this for, and taught it to, a mixed ability year 8 as part of a SOW on "The Tempest". This lesson focuses on explaining how the language shows that Ferdinand and Miranda are in love. Once the scene has been read, there are a few multiple-choice questions to ensure the pupils' understanding. In our classroom, all students respond simultaneously to these, making the letter shape with their arms, YMCA-style. However, mini-whiteboards could be used just as well. The pupils are then asked to zoom in on specific language features. For this lesson, language features include things like compliments as well as exaggeration and question. To support the understanding of the format of their answer, there is then a card sort (the Word document) so that the pupils can set out their own, model answer. The card sort also features an extension activity so that the more able can be stretched by extending their own response. Although I've taught this as part of a SOW on "The Tempest", it could be taught as part of a general Shakespeare scheme - no prior knowledge of the play is needed as long as the pupils know that Ferdinand is being held as a slave and Miranda is feeling sorry for him.
KS3, KS4, Poetry, analysis, close reading, effect, Ted Hughes, "Thistles" unseen, assessment,
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KS3, KS4, Poetry, analysis, close reading, effect, Ted Hughes, "Thistles" unseen, assessment,

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I planned this for a year 9 literacy class as part of a unit on work that’s intended to embed and develop the skills that will be tested at GCSE. What’s included here is a powerpoint lesson plan. The idea of this is that it uses questioning to develop the pupils’ knowledge and understanding of Hughes’ language features and structural features in the poem. The powerpoint covers Hughes’ use of enjambment, connotation, personification and semantic field. There is a worksheet here too which could be used, with brighter classes, for pre-reading or (as originally planned) for homework to embed what’s been covered in class. In my class, once this lesson had been taught, the poem was used for an assessment a week later to test whether or not what had been learned in the lesson had been absorbed - and, again, because at GCSE recall of lesson content will be crucial. Although created with a year 9 class in mind, this could also be used at KS4, particularly for those students who are in need of a bit of support with their response to the unseen poetry question.
KS3, "The Tempest", Act 1, scene 2, Prospero and Caliban, inference, langauge, close reading, P.E.E
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KS3, "The Tempest", Act 1, scene 2, Prospero and Caliban, inference, langauge, close reading, P.E.E

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Created for a mixed-ability year 8 class, this lesson focuses on Prospero's confrontation with Caliban and uses two, short speeches: Caliban's "When thou camest here first..." and Prospero's "Hag-seed, hence!" The key focus is on inference and the lesson begins by asking the pupils to write three similes based on what they've been able to infer from an image. Hopefully, this will embed their understanding of what's meant by the skill of inference which they then go on to apply to the two, short excerpts from the play. Caliban's speech is analysed verbally (though slide 7 can be printed off and stuck into exercise books if this part of the lesson needs to be formalised). The focus then switches to Prospero's speech. The pupils are guided through a verbal analysis of the effect of Prospero's imperatives and repetition and are then asked to write four paragraphs in response to this question: What do Shakespeare’s language and structural features reveal about Prospero’s relationship with Caliban? With my class, the expectation was that the pupils would write their first two paragraphs on the effect of the imperatives and repetition, having had the verbal model, and then go on to write more independently. With weaker groups, the verbal modal could instead be written on the board. For greater challenge, the modelling could be omitted altogether.
KS3 Fiction, Young James Bond, crr, comprehension, reading skills, cover, homework
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KS3 Fiction, Young James Bond, crr, comprehension, reading skills, cover, homework

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Created for my year 8 class as part of a unit of work on spy fiction, the extract comes from one of Charlie Higson's 'Young James Bond' novels and the questions focus on reading skills including naming and explaining the effect of language features. There is a focus on connotation as this was used for homework after a lesson exploring the idea of semantic field.
Unseen Poetry, "Alpine Letter" Ros Barber, pre-reading, homework, starter, multiple-choice quiz
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Unseen Poetry, "Alpine Letter" Ros Barber, pre-reading, homework, starter, multiple-choice quiz

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Created for a KS4 GCSE class as a pre-reading homework prior to an exam-style question on this poem (How does the writer present the speaker’s ideas about love?), this is a multiple-choice quiz with 21 questions focusing on the poem’s meaning, language and structure. You could use this having worked through the poem in class to support and develop pupils’ understanding. Alternatively, it could be used as a long starter activity to identify gaps in knowledge and understanding so that subsequent exploration of the poem can be more precisely focused. The poem is quite accessible so could also be used with a year 9 class at KS3 in those centres where GCSE-style questions are being introduced earlier.
"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, Titania and Oberon quarrel, vocabulary for effect.
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"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, Titania and Oberon quarrel, vocabulary for effect.

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I taught this lesson to my year 7 class (mixed ability) just after the lesson on Puck. This lesson introduces the idea of Oberon and Titania's argument and its repercussions. The lesson is intended to embed the idea that the fairies' quarrel has caused environmental disasters and, having asked the pupils to pick out features that communicate this chaos, they're then asked to complete their own writing, choosing negative vocabulary for precise effect.
"The Flowers", Alice Walker, Short Story, Comprehension, CRR, Genre, Analysis, Homework, Cover
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"The Flowers", Alice Walker, Short Story, Comprehension, CRR, Genre, Analysis, Homework, Cover

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I've used this for both year 9 and year 10 classes. This worksheet uses a complete short story by Alice Walker, "The Flowers", which is really useful for teaching in conjunction with "Strange Fruit", "Still I Rise" and "Of Mice and Men". Briefly, the story tells of a young girl, Myop, who stumbles across a dead body and gradually comes to the realisation that the dead man was the victim of a lynching. The questions are intended to make the pupils aware of the story's message and the metaphor of the summer ending at the end of the story. Questions also focus on the genre (fairy tale) of the story and the effect of Walker having written in this genre. Useful as a pre-reading homework so that pupils' responses can be discussed and understanding clarified in the lesson. An incredibly powerful story, this, which has never failed me and which is brilliant for helping the children develop their skills both of analysis and of inference.
"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, the nature of Puck, Lesson 1.
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"A Midsummer Night's Dream", Year 7, the nature of Puck, Lesson 1.

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This ppt introduces Puck with a focus on his pranks and the way he describes them to another fairy. There is opportunity for discussion and a short drama activity where the pupils freeze-frame one of the pranks and can be thought-tracked (this is drama that can easily be managed within the classroom). The lesson ends with the setting of a homework which is the creation of a wanted poster for Puck (the final slide is a template for this wanted poster).
KS4, AQA GCSE Eng Lang, paper 2, question 2, question 3, CHILDHOOD, inference, synthesis, language
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KS4, AQA GCSE Eng Lang, paper 2, question 2, question 3, CHILDHOOD, inference, synthesis, language

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Planned for my year 11 class, whose mock exam had revealed weaknesses in their approach to English Language paper 2, this lesson uses two texts about childhood - Henry Mayhew’s description of the watercress girl and an abridged extract from the Guardian - ‘Living Dolls’ about child beauty pageants. The lesson begins by using images to help the students hone their skills of inference and synthesis. Moving onto question 3, the lesson uses the mark criteria to reinforce for the students the shape and content of their response. The intention is that the students will write their response to question 2 in class and will work on the response to question 3 for homework.