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I am a History teacher in the North West, and head of Citizenship in my school. I have been teaching since 2007, in four secondary schools across the area. In between times, in 2012, I taught as a volunteer teacher in Ghana, with English, French and Maths classes (you can read about my adventures in my book, Teaching in the Sun, available on Amazon). All of my resources have been extensively tried and tested. I hope that you, like me, are able to use them for good and outstanding lessons.

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I am a History teacher in the North West, and head of Citizenship in my school. I have been teaching since 2007, in four secondary schools across the area. In between times, in 2012, I taught as a volunteer teacher in Ghana, with English, French and Maths classes (you can read about my adventures in my book, Teaching in the Sun, available on Amazon). All of my resources have been extensively tried and tested. I hope that you, like me, are able to use them for good and outstanding lessons.
Significance of Martin Luther King
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Significance of Martin Luther King

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This is a whole-lesson on Martin Luther King. it contains a link to the ‘I have a Dream’ speech, an information sheet on Martin Luther King 's beliefs and a factfile on Martin Luther King, differentiated for the lower ability students. The factfile can be turned into a spider diagram, or students can categorise information in it into Martin Luther King 's views, actions and consequences of actions. Students have a writing frame on which to base an evaluation of Martin Luther King’s significance. Students finish by considering the effect of non-peaceful protest.
King Charles II
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King Charles II

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This is a KS3 resource for the character of Charles II. Students decide whether or not they would have liked him. As a starter, they brainstorm the qualities of a good king. they can explain positive and negative aspects of his personality by highlighting information sheets, differentiated for higher and lower ability students. Key words are provided in the powerpoint. This can lead to a debate in class - split them to defend / attack Charles’ personality - and/or a piece of extended writing on whether he was a good / bad character. Different writing frames are included in the powerpoint. My classes love it every year. YouTube clip supports lesson as a way in.
Impacts of TNCs
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Impacts of TNCs

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A card sort and written task on the positive and negative aspects of TNCs. There are two versions of the activities, for higher- and lower-ability students. Students classify the impacts as to whether they are positive and negative. Students then arrange them into categories such as job creation, job loss, effect on richer/poorer countries, money, environment. Students complete a scaffolded written task to describe and explain the best and worst impacts of TNCs. They finish by examining whether a boycott of TNCs such as Nike would have a positive or negative effect. A list of key words is provided on the lower-ability resource.
Success of evacuation in WW2
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Success of evacuation in WW2

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This is a card sorting resource for KS3 or KS4 students looking at the success of the evacuation process, Operation Pied Piper, in 1939. Students can sort the cards into: advantages for children, disadvantages for children, successes of the process, failures of the process. Alternatively, they can sort them into good/bad points. Further activities can sort the cards for priorities of positives and negatives. There is a differentiated resource for lower ability students. This can lead to a discussion activity or a piece of extended writing on the success of evacuation. I have in the past used it as the basis of an assessment on the success of evacuation.
Black Power - impact
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Black Power - impact

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This is for KS4, and could be used at A level too. Students watch the videos to gain an insight into elements of the Black Power movement. Students then use the differentiated card sort activity to cut and stick, or complete in any other way, the venn diagram. The venn diagram categorises what attracted poorer people to Black Power, and What many people disliked about Black Power. It would be helpful to rtell students beforehand that: poorer, younger, working class black Americans were more likely to support the Black Panthers, and Black Power. Richer, older, middle class black Americans were more likely to support peaceful protest. This can lead to a class debate / extended writing / exam Q on whether Black Power was effective - either looking at it as a stand-alone, or copmparing it with prior knowledge on the peaceful Civil Rights movement.
Nuclear power
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Nuclear power

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The first activity is is a card sort designed to allow students to categorise information do to with nuclear energy. More able students can use the cards to explain their thoughts on the best and worst aspects of nuclear energy. There is a differentiated card sort for the lower-ability students. The second activity is a letter to the local council. This has a writing frame which can be used, and is differentiated for abilities.
Causes of the English Civil War
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Causes of the English Civil War

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This is a lesson resource in including a two-fold card sorting or cutting and sticking exercise. Students start by matching up key terms which will be used in this lesson and others on the Civil War. Students then move on to the causes of the war, on the worksheet. They decide which are the long-term and short term factors. They can subsequently arrange them according to blame - the king, Parliament, or no particular blame. Lower-ability students can move straight on to blaming the king, Parliament, or no-one in particular. Students can use the writing frame at the end to decide on the more important causes of the Civil War, and attach overall blame to the king / Parliament. A fun and informative lesson.
British rule in India
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British rule in India

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This is a card sorting resource on the development of Britain’s rule from the 1750s to 1947. There is a differentiated resource for lower ability students. Students are invited to sort the cards into categories: a) violence/war b) peaceful protest c) political power / government. Lower ability students can look at what was violent / non-violent. They then place the cards into chronological order, and can use the timeline to indicate where Britain’s rule was secure or weak. More able students can be challenged to decide how strong or weak each event showed British rule to be. Students can then answer the following questions on British India: 1. What event showed that British power was at its strongest? Why? 2. What event showed that British power was at its weakest, before 1947? Why? 3. What do you suggest about British rule in India over the years? Think of rise and fall of power. Why do you think that this was? This can lead to a class debate or piece of extended writing.
Migration to Britain: advantages and disadvantages
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Migration to Britain: advantages and disadvantages

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This is a resource to sort the advantages and disadvantages of migration to Britain, and invites students to prepare a debate on the issue. Students can decide which of these affect all, most, some or only a few migrants - and then decide which are the most important. Students can pair up as differentiation to prepare a debate on the good and bad points of migration.
Stuart England
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Stuart England

4 Resources
A resource pack to support the teaching of the Stuart period. Activities included to suit KS3 teaching, with plenty of scope for differentiation by either task or outcome for more- or less able students.
Migration to Britain
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Migration to Britain

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This is a card sort designed to allow students to categorise and prioritise reasons that groups of people have migrated to Britain throughout history. They can also be arranged as a chronology exercise. There is a second version of the cards designed for less able students. The categorising task could be done as a venn diagram using the venn diagram template.
Causes of the development of the British Empire
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Causes of the development of the British Empire

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A lesson on the development of thee British Empire. A blank copy of a world map is attached for a labelling exercise of the colonies of the Empire. Students complete card sorting activity on the reasons for the development of the empire. They can be challenged to come up with their own categories, or those on the table in the PowerPoint can be used. It can be done as a diamond 9 activity for more able students. There is a differentiated copy for lower-ability students. Students can decide on the key reason(s) and give their own explanation. It could also be one as a venn diagram using the venn diagram template, Finish by explaining the main trading routes, and have students draw these on their blank map.
Assassination of Franz Ferdinand
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Assassination of Franz Ferdinand

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This is a lesson for the events of the assassination and afterwards. Students can watch the clip and have a writing frame provided in the powerpoint to write an article. Key terms and people are explained in the powerpoint too. The second half is a card sort designed to allow students to understand what happened during and immediately after the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. Students arrange the cards into groups - what happened during and what happened immediately after the assassination. They can also be arranged as a chronology exercise. There is a differentiated version for less able students, and the very weak ones could be encouraged to match the country to the reaction… Students can pick out and explain 2 or 3 of the more significant of the events, which were important in the First World War breaking out, or the assassination itself.
Development of Medieval Parliament
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Development of Medieval Parliament

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A lesson on the development of Medieval Parliament. Students begin by discussing what they know about Parliament today. They then look at information on the slides, which should be printed off and stuck around the classroom. They fill in thee activity sheet as thy look around.There are extension questions for the more able students at the end of the activity sheet. Students complete a judgemental paragraph at the end of the lesson. There is a writing frame and key words to help less able students.
Elizabethan Poor Law
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Elizabethan Poor Law

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This is for GCSE History. Students have three sheets which they can work through. the powerpoint is slide with definitions of the impotent / undeserving / deserving poor 1. Laws against begging and why they failed - Students match the law to why it failed, and higher ability students can take note of whose reign each was passed in. More able students can answer two extension questions to compare the laws of Henry VIII to Elizabeth. 2. The Act for the Relief of the Poor – 1601 - Students match up which parts of the Poor Law fit to which people. Terms of the poor law are underneath - you may want to cut the sheet in half so that terms and the chart are not together. Refer to the PowerPoint if needed for this. There is an extension question underneath the chart for the more able. 3. Effectiveness of the Poor Law - students colour code or use as a card sort the strengths and weaknesses of the Poor Law. They can consider the biggest strength and greatest weakness, before making an overall judgement on the effectiveness of the Poor Law. The best responses will suggests that whilst the effect was limited, it was a significant step and certainly better than anything attempted before.
League of Nations success in the 1920s
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League of Nations success in the 1920s

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A cut and stick activity which leads to a piece of judgemental writing on successes of the League of Nations. Students match up point of success to the evidence surrounding it. They stick each matched point and piece of evidence into the table. This could alternatively be recorded in the venn diagram. They then give their own explanation, such as ‘This was a more / less meaningful success because…’ Students can categorise and prioritise the different aspects of success, into areas such as local peacekeeping, global peacekeeping and global improvement. More able students can explain which was the most significant of the achievements, in the short and long term. This is an ideal activity for preparing students for longer-answer exam questions. It allows discussion to develop as students explain their thoughts and defend them in front of their peers.
Why did the Troubles begin?
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Why did the Troubles begin?

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This is a whole lesson for KS3. There are linked youTube videos explaining how the Troubles began, and defining key terms. For higher ability students, there is a link to a YouTube clip on gerrymandering. Part of it is useful. Students are invited to match key terms up, and then have an extension to decide whether the IRA’s aim was a good one. Students then are invited to complete a diamaond 9 ranking. Categories are marked on the powerpoint - historical/political/social/other factors. They have extensions to judge key causes, which can be given at teacher discretion, and to give their own thoughts on the Troubles’ beginnings. This can easily lead to class debate.
Who looks after our local community?
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Who looks after our local community?

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This is a resource for the teaching of local community. The powerpoint has within it a spider diagram task for students to complete, on who plays a role in looking after and protecting the local community. The cut and stick resource allows students to match up the different people and groups within the community to their roles. Answers are given in the powerpoint and discussion can be worked in through the feedback of these answers. As an extension, students can explain who is the most important part of the community, and how these people and groups are interdependent. The living graph excersize can be done with the ‘6. Ways of helping community cards’ resource. there are 15 methods shown - but not all need to be used in as smaller class, and it can be printed on different colour paper, for a second line to be made - this can lead to stimulating debate as students explain why they have lined themselves up as they have. This leads to a discussion on how ordinary people, and students themselves, can look after the community.
Anti-social behaviour problems  in the community
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Anti-social behaviour problems in the community

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This a lesson for KS3/4 Citizenship. Pupils initially have to make spider diagram on Doc 1 of what anti-social behaviour problems there are in society. More able students are invited to explain which are the most serious. With the diamond 9 ranking, higher ability students can use the ‘(H) Diamond 9’ sheet. They explain in the space provided why each of these examples is a problem. They can then make 3 separate arrangements (get students to sort first bullet point, then put them all back together, then sort second bullet point, then put them all back together, then sort third bullet point), of which problems: • Damage property • Make the community look unpleasant • Leave longer-term mental scars for victims (choose up to 5) Then arrange as a diamond 9 card sort. Lower ability students can use the differentiated version, and colour code these categories - some will fit into more than one category, then arrange as a diamond 9 card sort. With Doc 2, students match the people on the left hand side of the info sheet to the work that they do in the community. They should then explain how these people/groups might contribute to solving problems of anti-social behaviour. Potential answers in notes section of ppt slide 7, and can be printed to help lower-ability students. More able students are invited to explain which are the most useful people or groups.
Bus Boycott
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Bus Boycott

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A chronology activity for events of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. It can ether be done as a numbering activity, or as a card sort. Each description is numbered, at present, for teacher’s ease of reading. Remember to tipp-ex out the numbers before use. There is a differentiated sheet for lower-ability students. More able student can explain which was the most significant of the consequences, in the short and long term. They can relate to the protesters themselves and the wider Civil Rights movement/USA. This is an ideal activity for preparing students for longer-answer exam questions. It allows discussion to develop as students explain their thoughts and defend them in front of their peers.