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French Numbers 1-10
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French Numbers 1-10

(1)
Numbers in French designed to look like their pronunciation or spelling (e.g. the number 5 is sinking; sank). Use as flashcards (you can easily hide the numbers at the top and bottom with your hands) or display on the wall. Intended for primary school audience, but could work in secondary school as well. A4 size, but you could also print them A5 for using in one-to-one sessions.
Spanish BASICS Language Mat
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Spanish BASICS Language Mat

(6)
A language mat to stick on the table or hand out to help pupils with the basics. My pupils find the target language section particularly useful.
French BASICS Language Mat
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French BASICS Language Mat

(3)
A language mat to stick on the table or hand out to help pupils with the basics. My pupils find the target language section particularly useful.
The Hill of Être
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The Hill of Être

(2)
This is for teaching which verbs use être as the auxiliary verb in the perfect (passé composé) tense. The hill shows all the verbs with an element of ‘transition’. Not an original idea, but I struggled to find an illustration of it that I was happy with, so I made my own. This can be either displayed or stuck in pupils' books as a reference material. My pupils are always amused by the idea of someone falling and dying (!) at the end of the story, which makes it memorable. Usually, I only need to draw a quick sketch of a house on a hill on the board to remind them of how some verbs are different.
Hacia Lo Salvaje song (Present / Preterit)
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Hacia Lo Salvaje song (Present / Preterit)

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Lesson objective: Identify and translate the present and past (preterit) tense in a Spanish song. Here is a link to the song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdf152L-D3g And a translation of the lyrics: https://lyricstranslate.com/en/hacia-lo-salvaje-wild.html This lesson guides pupils through translating a modern Spanish song by breaking it down into manageable chunks. It would be best used soon after a lesson introducing or revising the preterit tense and is designed for a mixed or high ability Y9 class or a KS4 class. It could be used with any topic. This lesson exposes pupils to authentic Spanish, which helps prepare them to deal with literary texts. It gives them a chance to develop translating skills and gain new vocabulary, while reminding them of the present and preterit tenses. I have tested this lesson with a mixed-ability Y9 class, though we did not do the final task as we did a vocabulary test and reviewed expectations in the same lesson instead. I touch up all the materials I upload to TES to ensure they of a high quality. They use a combination of curated illustrations and images as well as high-quality graphics that I have created myself. The use of icons to represent different structures encourages a Target Language environment. Feel free to use these graphics in any of your own lessons, including any lessons you may wish to upload for free on TES, as these are most powerful when the pupils recognise them across lessons and make a connection with what you are saying in the Target Language.
MFL Literacy Display (FR/ES)
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MFL Literacy Display (FR/ES)

(1)
This attractive, multilingual display helps support literacy in your French/Spanish classroom. When laid out in the right order (5x3, see image), you can see a map of the world in the background. For this reason, I suggest trimming before putting up on display. For the best effect, laminate with a matte effect. Now also available in a French and German combo! See my shop!
Present vs Future Tense (Listen/Translate)
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Present vs Future Tense (Listen/Translate)

(0)
Ever teach the perfect tense and then find they have forgotten the present tense straight after? Find that your pupils are bogged down by all the details of the perfect tense? This is an ideal lesson to introduce or, even better, re-introduce the future tense with ‘ir’ because it focuses on just part of it and puts it directly in comparison with the present tense, so pupils can notice for themselves the differences between them. It gives the attention to meaning and pronunciation before dealing with form in a combined explicit and implicit approach. Lesson objective: Analyse spoken sentences to compare the present and the future in Spanish and form the future tense. I used this lesson with both a year 8 class and a year 9 class who had already seen the future tense before, but needed to be reintroduced. I’ve since tidied up the layout, added new images and added extra optional activities. The lesson also comes with an optional extended worksheet, which you could give to a whole class, just those pupils who won’t easily be able to get down or to any students who miss the lesson. Like all my lessons, it uses easily-recognisable icons to help support a Target Language environment. Instructions are given in TL, often with the English translation – I recommend deleting the translation for classes who don’t need it! The lesson also includes detailed slide-by-slide comments, with explanations and tips for delivery. There is a crossword to print for the starter activity, but if you prefer, you can sub this out for the alternative starter, which requires no printing. The recording for the listening activity is included in the powerpoint and as a separate file, but you can also listen to it here: https://rhinospike.com/audio_requests/jaimepapier/50541/ NOTE: In the version for download, I have slowed down the recording slightly and added extra pauses. The font Trebuchet MS is required to view this powerpoint and the worksheets correctly. This is usually pre-installed on Windows or with Office.
Perfect vs Present Tense (Listen/Translate)
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Perfect vs Present Tense (Listen/Translate)

(0)
Ever teach the perfect tense and then find they have forgotten the present tense straight after? Find that your pupils are bogged down by all the details of the perfect tense? This is an ideal lesson to introduce or, even better, re-introduce the perfect tense because it focuses on just one part of it and puts it directly in comparison with the present tense, so pupils can notice for themselves the differences between them. It gives the attention to meaning and pronunciation before dealing with form in a combined explicit and implicit approach. Lesson objective: To use the past tense to translate phrases with “have done” or “did” and compare it with the present. I used this lesson with both a year 8 class and a year 9 class who had already seen the perfect tense before, but badly needed to review it. I’ve since tidied up the layout, added new images and added extra optional activities. The lesson also comes with an extended worksheet, which you could give to a whole class, just those pupils who won’t easily be able to get down or to any students who miss the lesson. Like all my lessons, it uses easily-recognisable icons to help support a Target Language environment. Instructions are given in TL, often with the English translation – I recommend deleting the translation for classes who don’t need it! The lesson also includes detailed slide-by-slide comments, with explanations and tips for delivery. There is a crossword to print for the starter activity, but if you prefer, you can sub this out for the alternative starter, which requires no printing. The recording for the listening activity is included in the powerpoint and as a separate file, but you can also listen to it here: https://rhinospike.com/audio_requests/jaimepapier/50584/ NOTE: In the version for download, I have increased the length of the pauses. The font Trebuchet MS is required to view this powerpoint and the worksheets correctly. This is usually pre-installed on Windows or with Office.
Spanish Tense Ending Support Sheets
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Spanish Tense Ending Support Sheets

(0)
Support sheets for the present, preterit, imperfect, future and conditional tenses. They are two to a page so, when cut in half, they fit neatly into a small exercise book. I’ve found these to be very effective if issues directly after covering all forms of a tense. Pupils quickly get into the habit of checking the table when they need to conjugate a verb. Also, if these are glued into books instead of stuck on the wall, they can easily be hidden for tests. They can also be taken home to support for homework, instead of pupils trying to use Google Translate! If you did want to display these, just print them on coloured paper and stick them around your room! Unlike other tables, duplicate endings are not repeated, which avoids bogging down the support sheet unnecessarily and helps the pupils realise that they aren’t so many endings to learn. Examples are given with translations, to make it clear how these endings actually apply in real communication.
MFL Literacy Display (FR/DE)
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MFL Literacy Display (FR/DE)

(1)
This attractive, multilingual display helps support literacy in your French/German classroom. When laid out in the right order (5x3, see image), you can see a map of the world in the background. For this reason, I suggest trimming before putting up on display. For the best effect, laminate with a matte effect. I created this version of my French and Spanish literacy display when another member commented to say they were looking for a French and German version. If there is demand for another combination, it can be done!