Hero image

79Uploads

15k+Views

5k+Downloads

50 Home School Countdown Numbers Game
pjackson2009pjackson2009

50 Home School Countdown Numbers Game

(1)
Perfect for home school maths fun! Pease remember to rate and review A selection of fifty of the numbers game from Countdown. Each slide has music along with the animation. Answers are provided with each of the examples - although there are other ways to get the answer as well. Every tenth example has the best possible solution 1 away from the target.
Countdown Game for Maths Vocabulary
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Countdown Game for Maths Vocabulary

5 Resources
A collection of over 400 maths-related words all with the animation and theme music of Countdown. This is a really fun and easy way to encourage students to play along and take notice of key words for different topics.
Algebra 05/31 Multiplying Algebraic Terms
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Algebra 05/31 Multiplying Algebraic Terms

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Multiplying Algebraic Terms’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Spot different ways of writing the same expression. S) Match expressions with their simplified forms. G) Simplify complex multiplication expressions.
Algebra 11/31 Rearranging Formulae
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Algebra 11/31 Rearranging Formulae

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Rearranging Formulae’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Practise solving equations. S) Learn how to rearrange simple formulae. G) Practise rearranging simple and complex formulae. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you don’t, please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Algebra 21/31 Factorising Quadratics
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Algebra 21/31 Factorising Quadratics

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Factorising Quadratics’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Expand double brackets. S) Expand quadratic brackets. G) Expand triple and cubic brackets. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you don’t, please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Countdown Game Template
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Countdown Game Template

(4)
This is a template for the numbers and letters round of the game Countdown. Both slides have animated entry for the letters/numbers. Both slides have animated Countdown clock. Both slides have Countdown clock “music” which plays with the animation.
Full GCSE Probability Course
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Full GCSE Probability Course

13 Resources
With this bundle, you get 13 lessons for the price of 10! In fact, several whole lessons have at least two lesson’s worth of work. This is a series of 13 mastery-style lessons on Probability. The topics include Venn Diagrams, Frequency Trees, and Probability Trees. All lessons use a pastel coloured background (which can be changed in ‘master slide view’) and the Verdana font which has been shown to be good for dyslexic students. These lessons are fully differentiated, and they use whiteboard questions as a scaffolding method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with the correct answer which they then have to pick. The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. There is a slide of 6 skills-based questions to ensure students have the skills they need to proceed with the lesson. Each lesson in this series has a bank of practice questions on the final slide. This is designed to be used in different possible ways. It can be used as a consolidation task after the lesson, as a homework sheet, as an exit ticket (choose a question), or as a cover lesson.
Probability 03/13 Mutually Exclusive Events
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Probability 03/13 Mutually Exclusive Events

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Mutually Exclusive Events’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) List successful outcomes of an event. S) Determine if events are mutually exclusive. G) List mutually exclusive events. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you didn’t please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Probability 06/13 Experimental Probability
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Probability 06/13 Experimental Probability

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Experimental Probability’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Calculate theoretical probabilities. S) Conduct two experiments. G) Calculate experimental probabilities. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you didn’t please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Colouring Bars for Equivalent Fractions
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Colouring Bars for Equivalent Fractions

(3)
A nice simple worksheet for students to use for shading in bars to see fractions which are equivalent. Perfect for primary and secondary mathematics lessons. This activity is especially nice for the more visual learners, and those who find it more difficult to conceptualize mathematics. This resource includes a rainbow-colored “fraction wall” for students to refer to. This wall is helpfully the same width as the bars for the examples and the questions. All parts of the resource are easily editable. It had a dyslexic-friendly font and can be printed on any color paper without loss of aesthetic. This is also a nice time to introduce to the students the idea of the “part to whole” relationship that fractions indicate. As always, if you do choose to download this resource, thank you, and please leave feedback for any improvements I could make to it.
Algebra 29/31 Substitution and Iteration
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Algebra 29/31 Substitution and Iteration

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Substitution and Iteration’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Revisit substitution and practise it. S) Learn what iterative sequences are. G) Find values of iterative sequences. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you don’t, please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Algebra 03/31 Forming Expressions
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Algebra 03/31 Forming Expressions

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Forming Expressions’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Link sentences and expressions. S) Construct expressions from diagrams. G) Simplify expressions. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you didn’t please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Shapes 01/05 Nets of 3D Shapes
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Shapes 01/05 Nets of 3D Shapes

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Nets of 3D Shapes’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Learn vocabulary for 3D shapes. S) Draw nets of simple shapes. G) Use nets to calculate surface area. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you don’t, please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Probability 04/13 Exhaustive Events
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Probability 04/13 Exhaustive Events

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Exhaustive Events’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) List all outcomes of an event. S) Learn how to calculate missing probabilities of outcomes. G) Calculate missing probabilities of outcomes. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you didn’t please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Probability 01/13 Language of Probability
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Probability 01/13 Language of Probability

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Language of Probability’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are prvoided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Use words to describe the probability of events. S) Place probability words on a scale. G) Associate words with numbers. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you didn’t please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Algebra Course Parts 1 and 2 - 20 Full Lessons
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Algebra Course Parts 1 and 2 - 20 Full Lessons

20 Resources
A massive 45% discount on these 20 lessons with this bundle! A great collection of 20 lessons to introduce students to algebra. Part 1, on its own, is also available here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/resource-12434912 Part 2, on its own, is also available here: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/resource-12443957 Starting with the basics with the Order of Operations, working through Notation and how to simplify algebraic terms, Rearranging Formulae, and ending with Inequalities and Factorising Expressions. The lessons all follow a simple theme with dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana). There are whiteboard diagnostic questions throughout and fully scaffolded practice questions and worksheets.
Algebra 22/31 Expand & Factorise Quadratics
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Algebra 22/31 Expand & Factorise Quadratics

(0)
This lesson titled ‘Expand & Factorise Quadratics’ is fully differentiated, and uses whiteboard questions as a scaffolding and Assessment for Learning method. These whiteboard questions are also particularly useful for reducing students’ maths anxiety by providing them with multiple answer they can choose from. All of the whiteboard questions have diagnostic-style wrong answers, obtained from common misconceptions The title of the lesson is throughout the PowerPoint. This provides consistency throughout, allows students to catch up if they missed it, and takes late-comers into consideration. The date is also throughout the PowerPoint and updates automatically. This is done so that the students know exactly where it is each lesson, and to make it easier on the class teacher. A dyslexic-friendly font (Verdana) is used throughout the PowerPoint and any worksheets. Worksheets are embedded in the PowerPoint on the slides to which they relate. Animated answers to all questions are provided where possible. The learning objectives are designed to be as short sentences as possible to allow students to read them and write them down (if necessary) as quickly as possible. They also use a mixture of simplistic and specialised words to engages students’ thinking about definitions whilst allowing them to access the meaning of the sentences. These objectives are reviewed at the end of the lesson as a self-evaluation of learning technique. Students are awarded ‘brain’ medals depending on how well they have done. These are kept as simple as possible and broken down carefully. This is to encourage students to access the material whilst giving them the confidence by achieving something in the lesson. B) Learn expand double brackets. S) Learn how to factorise monic quadratics G) Discuss why the steps of factorisation are all important. If you like the resource, please leave a review. If you don’t, please leave one anyway with any suggestions on how I could improve it. Whilst this lesson is part of a larger bundle, and does link nicely with some of the other lessons, it can certainly be used independently as well.
Who Wants to be a Mathematician (FDP)
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Who Wants to be a Mathematician (FDP)

(0)
collection of fifteen questions with fully animated solutions in the form of Who Wants to be a Millionaire. This is perfect for the end of a lesson, a recap, or an end-of-topic activity. Topics are: Decimals to fractions Fractions to decimals True or False questions Largest/smallest decimals and fractions Fractions of an amount. The template for this presentation, so you can create your own if you choose, can be found here. I have a few other similar resources, so please check out my others! If you do choose to download my resource(s), thank you, and please leave feedback on how I can improve.
Solving One-sided Equations by Balancing
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Solving One-sided Equations by Balancing

(0)
This lesson introduces students to the method of balancing to solve equations. Learning objectives: B) Link scales to the balancing method for solving equations. S) Solve equations with multiplication and addition. G) Solve equations with multiplication and subtraction. All slides are provided with animated answers. There are several example slides at the beginning followed by some white board questions to ensure understanding. There is a nice worksheet task with 4 questions where students have, for each question, a scales diagram, an equation, and the value of x. There is the a list of fifteen questions of increasing difficulty. The first 5 are simply multiplication equations to ensure that students are able to start the activity. The next 5 are with multiplication and addition. The last 5 are with multiplication and subtraction. All solutions are included. There are then some “progress check” questions (again with solutions) to determine how well the students have understood the lesson. Finally, there are 4 examples of “Countdown for Keywords” where students are given thirty seconds to sort the letters into one of the lesson’s key words.
Pirate Game, 15 Different Pages
pjackson2009pjackson2009

Pirate Game, 15 Different Pages

(5)
The famous pirate game. Perfect for end-of-term activity. This slight variation uses a random name generator alongside it to choose who gets hit by the uncontrollable bomb (the students love this aspect). Instructions for play are on the notes of the first slide. This slide has the grid on which I use to cross out grid references during the game. All images and text has “no background” so the sheets can be printed on any color sheet and still look good.