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Add On History

10 years classroom experience teaching U.S. and World History at the middle school level. I have also been a contributor to several online study resource sites such as eNotes.com. I have also developed game-based curriculum for several educational groups and have helped design curriculum for teachers across the state of California. I am also a trainer for CUE California and have presented technology-enhanced curriculum ideas at several conferences throughout the SF Bay Area.

10 years classroom experience teaching U.S. and World History at the middle school level. I have also been a contributor to several online study resource sites such as eNotes.com. I have also developed game-based curriculum for several educational groups and have helped design curriculum for teachers across the state of California. I am also a trainer for CUE California and have presented technology-enhanced curriculum ideas at several conferences throughout the SF Bay Area.
Colonial Government Simulation Game
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Colonial Government Simulation Game

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This activity gives students a chance to more fully explore and understand how the different parts of English colonial government functioned by giving them a chance to solve problems experienced by an actual English colony. Students will take on several different roles, and by acting out of their assigned roles they will gain an understanding how a colonial charter, assembly, and governor all interacted and worked together to establish rule of law in the New World. This is a great simulation activity for all ages and reinforces all the key concepts relating to English colonial law and government. It includes; - a teacher handbook to explain the activity and give suggestions for setting it up - an example map of the colony and a blank one if you want to create your own - student handouts including a charter and student scenario slips and
The New World - European Exploration and Colonization Simulation
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The New World - European Exploration and Colonization Simulation

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This highly interactive group-based game helps students to understand the economic and political factors that influenced the development of colonies in the New World. Not only will students learn about how trade, alliances, wars, and geography played a role in the early development of North America, but they will develop communication, planning, collaboration, and leadership skills, all of which blend nicely with schools who have targeted goals in 21st century learning initiatives. An optional reflective writing assignment can also make this game meet Common Core guidelines. This game was developed over eight years of in-class testing and is engaging, informative, and fun. You won't be disappointed, and students of all ages will love it! This product includes; - a printable game board - a student rule book as well as a teachers guide for first time players - all the files, handouts, and resources your students need to play!
Common Sense: CCSS Reading Activity
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Common Sense: CCSS Reading Activity

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This reading activity introduces students to Common Sense by Thomas Paine, one of the most important written works of the Revolutionary War era. During this document-based investigations, students will use Paine's original text to respond to questions and criticisms relating to independence. Students at a lower reading level will have access to a translated copy of Paine's text, insuring that all students can participate in this Common Core activity! This product comes complete with questions, a made-to-assemble copy of selections from Common Sense, and a teachers guide to help you plan and get started. It includes; - directions for the first time teacher - selections for Thomas Paine's work that include translations for scaffolding
Constitutional Convention Simulation
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Constitutional Convention Simulation

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What happened at the Constitutional Convention? How did our government take shape? Who were the people who helped form our country and how did they do it? This engaging simulation helps students to experience the excitement, compromise, and debates that helped form our national government by recreating the Constitutional Convention of 1787. In it, each student takes on the role of an actual delegate and will reenact three of the most important moments of the entire convention. Using compromise and critical thinking, students will have to try and create consensus to score points, ultimately becoming “Father of the Constitution” by making sure their delegate’s ideas shape the final document. This is a fun, engaging, thought-provoking simulation for upper grade but can be adjusted for younger learners as well. This product contains handouts, teacher scorekeeping sheets, delegate profiles and detailed instructions to make sure you are your students get the most from this fun activity.
Patriots vs. Loyalists - An American Revolution Strategy Game
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Patriots vs. Loyalists - An American Revolution Strategy Game

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Many Americans assume that the American Revolution was fought between the united forces of the freedom-loving colonies against invading hordes of foreign soldiers from Europe. But in truth, the war itself was much more complex. Americans fought for both king and country during the war, siding with their adoptive homes in the colonies or with their ancestral homes in Britain depending on how they felt about the war. This group-based strategy game takes place during the course of the American Revolution. Students are divided up into two factions; Patriots and Loyalists, and then subdivided into the different colonies. As residents of the colonies, they will try to build support for their side by scoring points. How they score points is ultimately up to the teacher, making this game something that can compliment any curriculum that already exists. It can also be used as a stand-alone study game by utilizing the included quizzes, each of which challenge students’ knowledge of the American Revolution, its leaders, and it’s important in American History. While students do their best to generate support in their own colonies, they must also think long-term about how best to win the game. Groups of students will take turns commanding the military of their faction and using the generated resources effectively to do things like supply armies, seek assistance for foreign countries, and court the favor of Native American tribes. This game is a great addition to your study of the American Revolution and an excellent way to develop 21st century skills like collaboration, critical thinking, and planning. I’ve used it for about four years already and its always a hit with students of all learning levels. Comes with everything you need to play; - Detailed Official Rulebook - Game Map (also includes huge wall-sized printable poster!) - Printable game components like turn sheets, teacher references, and other game components. - 10 quizzes (with answer key) all about the causes and course of the American Revolution! AND all our games and sims come with support by email during your first deployment!
The People vs. Andrew Jackson Mock Trial
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The People vs. Andrew Jackson Mock Trial

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Andrew Jackson: Hero or Villain? If he were put on trial, what would the verdict be? Students get to analyze both sides of this famous American president during this fun Common Core activity. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources to build their cases and then play to role of the lawyers, witnesses, and jury as they determine once and for all if Jackson is the hero of the common man, or the devil incarnate.
Civil War Simulation Game
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Civil War Simulation Game

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The Civil War raged from 1861-1865 and claimed the lives of over 2% of the U.S. population. A war of this scale deserves an equally amazing set of lessons, and this grand simulation is sure way to get your students interested. This group-based simulation allows students to fight the Civil War as either the Union of Confederacy in a team-based game. Students take the role of either the government or army groups and try to take territory and cities while training armies, researching technology, and build their navies in order to win. By taking their opponents cities, they will rob them of production points, and eventually gain victory. This game is designed to be played over a number of weeks, but only takes a few minutes a day to complete. Its a turn-based game that is easy to learn, but hard to master. Your students will have a great time and its the perfect compliment to your unit on the Civil War.