Non-Fiction Writing Bundle for GCSE (1)

Non-Fiction Writing Bundle for GCSE (1)

Buy a bundle of lessons on the following writing formats for GCSE English Language: 1) The text of a leaflet 2) Broadsheet articles 3) Discursive essays (PPT included is for higher ability) 4) Formal letters 5) The text of a speech For PowerPoint 3 (Discursive essays), an alternative bundle is available. All PowerPoints are accompanied by their corresponding paper resources and contain the necessary links to the required texts.
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Elements of Structure

Elements of Structure

A 30-slide PowerPoint that aims to teach the concept of structure in fiction and how to respond to Paper 1, Question 3 (AQA 8700). The PowerPoint covers: 1) An entry task based on a quotation from Stephen King 2) The meaning of structure in fiction texts 3) The difference between language and structure 4) Key structural devices including: dialogue, repetition, first sentence/last sentence/narrative standpoint, sequence of events, focus, foreshadowing, foregrounding, analepsis, prolepsis, motif, zoom in, zoom out, cyclical structure, cohesion, symbolism and internal/external contrast. Students cut up a grid of terms and match the terms to their explanations. Some of these are self-explanatory. This activity should be done in pairs, although students should have their own copies for revision purposes. 5) A sample response in relation to a Question 3 focusing on an extract from 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'. Success criteria included. 6) Freytag's Pyramid of Dramatic Structure. Students add detail to a relevant diagram. 7) Application of Freytag's Pyramind in relation to the story of Little Red Riding Hood 8) Application of Freytag's Pyramid in relation to Paper 1, Question 3 9) Sample questions for students to complete. Two extracts provided are from 'A Christmas Carol' and 'Jekyll and Hyde'. 10) Sample responses to the Jekyll/Carol questions. Student read and judge against the success critera. 11) An opportunity for peer assessment of their own responses 12) Self-reflection. Given the emphasis on clear explanation of structural features, students should be working at or towards level 3 on the relevantAQA mark scheme.
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Macbeth: Act One Revision

Macbeth: Act One Revision

A series of seven tasks promoting revision of Act One of 'Macbeth'. It includes: 1) Place the following events from Act One in order, numbering them from 1-12 2) In relation to Act One, suggest the significance of the following images: a crown, a baby, a sun, a pig, a serpent and a bell. (images provided) 3) Match the quotation to the speaker and then its significance. 4) Read Lady Macbeth's soliloquy (Act 1, 5) and complete the following tasks - identify the missing words - explain what is meant by the phrases in bold - identify the techniques that Shakespeare has used in the words/phrases that have been underlined. Suggest why Shakespeare may have used them. What do they bring to the play? 5) By the end of Act One, identify 2-3 things we have learnt about: - Duncan -Lady Macbeth - Banquo - Lady Macbeth 6) Complete the following table in relation to the 3 Witches (students should identify the scenes in which they appear, what we learn about them and whether Shakespeare presents them as good, evil or both. 7) Read this extract from Act One, Scene 5. How does Shakespeare present the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth? There is an answer sheet included which could be presented on an interactive whiteboard so that sample answers can be annotated/scrutinised against the literature mark scheme (this is available on the AQA website). The exemplar responses are aimed at middle-upper attaining students. These tasks could be set as homework to promote revision of some of the key moments in Act One.
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Macbeth Homework Booklets

Macbeth Homework Booklets

Four moderately differentiated homework booklets for the study of 'Macbeth'. Each booklet includes: 1) A brief guide to the AQA 8700/8702 Language and Literature exams; 2) The 8702 assessment objectives, translated into simpler English. 3) A sample Macbeth question 4) 11 extracts from the play, with similar activities for each (cover image gives an indication). A the end of each booklet is a brief revision and consolidation section. Booklet 5A is largely in font size 14 with line-spacing at 1.5. In the first section, you may need to edit the information about the Literature exam if your group is not studying 'A Christmas Carol'. These booklets were last saved using Word 2016.
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Elements of Structure

Elements of Structure

A 30-slide PowerPoint that aims to teach the concept of structure in fiction and how to respond to Paper 1, Question 3 (AQA 8700). The PowerPoint covers: 1) An entry task based on a quotation from Stephen King 2) The meaning of structure in fiction texts 3) The difference between language and structure 4) Key structural devices including: dialogue, repetition, first sentence/last sentence/narrative standpoint, sequence of events, focus, foreshadowing, foregrounding, analepsis, prolepsis, motif, zoom in, zoom out, cyclical structure, cohesion, symbolism and internal/external contrast. Students cut up a grid of terms and match the terms to their explanations. Some of these are self-explanatory. This activity should be done in pairs, although students should have their own copies for revision purposes. 5) A sample response in relation to a Question 3 focusing on an extract from 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'. Success criteria included. 6) Freytag's Pyramid of Dramatic Structure. Students add detail to a relevant diagram. 7) Application of Freytag's Pyramind in relation to the story of Little Red Riding Hood 8) Application of Freytag's Pyramid in relation to Paper 1, Question 3 9) Sample questions for students to complete. Two extracts provided are from 'A Christmas Carol' and 'Jekyll and Hyde'. 10) Sample responses to the Jekyll/Carol questions. Student read and judge against the success critera. 11) An opportunity for peer assessment of their own responses 12) Self-reflection. Given the emphasis on clear explanation of structural features, students should be working at or towards level 3 on the relevantAQA mark scheme.
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Non-Fiction Writing Bundle for GCSE (1)

Non-Fiction Writing Bundle for GCSE (1)

Buy a bundle of lessons on the following writing formats for GCSE English Language: 1) The text of a leaflet 2) Broadsheet articles 3) Discursive essays (PPT included is for higher ability) 4) Formal letters 5) The text of a speech For PowerPoint 3 (Discursive essays), an alternative bundle is available. All PowerPoints are accompanied by their corresponding paper resources and contain the necessary links to the required texts.
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Non-Fiction Writing Bundle for GCSE (2)

Non-Fiction Writing Bundle for GCSE (2)

Buy a bundle of lessons on the following writing formats for GCSE English Language: 1) The text of a leaflet 2) Broadsheet articles 3) Discursive essays (PPT included is for lower ability) 4) Formal letters 5) The text of a speech For PowerPoint 3 (Discursive essays), an alternative bundle is available. All PowerPoints are accompanied by the relevant paper resources and contain links to the necessary texts.
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Formal Letter Writing for GCSE

Formal Letter Writing for GCSE

Aimed at middle-upper ability GCSE groups, this PowerPoint teaches the layout and language of a formal letter. It is oriented towards AQA 8700/2/Question 5 but could be adapted for other boards. In order, the PowerPoint contents are: 1) A multiple-choice entry task 2) AQA advice on features of format 3) A sample AQA-style question. Students identify PAF and reflect on the importance of being mindful of PAF in relation to Question 5. Extension task included. 4) The layout of a formal letter, which students copy. Extension questions included. 5) Notes regarding the formal greeting and formal sign-off 6) A re-cap on the features of formal and informal language. Students cut the features out, organise them under two headings and stick them into their books. 7) An example response to the given question. Students read and identify different features (differentiated) 7) An opportunity for independent writing, with success criteria provided. 8) Peer assessmemt and self-reflection.
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Discursive Essay Writing for GCSE: Revision Sheet

Discursive Essay Writing for GCSE: Revision Sheet

A two-page guide to writing a discursive essay. The topics covered are: 1) The purpose and content of the introduction 2) The role of topic sentences 3) Different forms of evidence 4) Concluding sentences 5) The use of counterargument 6) The content and purpose of the conclusion This revision sheet is suitable for upper-ability learners at GCSE.
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Discursive Essay Writing for GCSE (Lower Ability)

Discursive Essay Writing for GCSE (Lower Ability)

A full lesson on GCSE discursive essay writing for lower ability learners. The PowerPoint covers: 1) The purpose of a discursive essay, with a sample question that learners are encouraged to 'break down'. This includes an extension question. 2) Planning a response + extension question 3) Structuring a discursive essay 4) PEA paragraphs in a discursive essay 5) Counterargument 6) A sample response for annotation + extension activity 7) An opportunity for learners to produce their own responses 8) A peer assessment activity 9) Self-reflection The lesson was produced with AQA 8700/2 in mind but could apply to other exam boards.
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AQA Paper 2, Question 5 Proofreading Task: School Uniform

AQA Paper 2, Question 5 Proofreading Task: School Uniform

A sample essay in response to an AQA 8700, Paper 2, Question 5-style task. There is a teacher copy and a student copy. The latter is littered with deliberate errors for learners to identify and correct. It is aimed at middle-upper ability groups and the question could be adapted to be relevant to other boards. It could be used as a homework activity or a lesson starter to draw attention to the need for checking for spelling, punctuation and grammar.
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Discursive Essay Writing for GCSE (Higher Ability)

Discursive Essay Writing for GCSE (Higher Ability)

An extended lesson on writing a discursive essay, aimed at middle-upper-ability GCSE. It covers: 1) The assessment objectives for writing (learners should put these in their own words) 2) What is a discursive essay? 3) Planning in full and planning in the exam 4) A planning activity to carry out in pairs, followed by feedback 5) The structure of a discursive essay 6) Different ways to start a discursive essay 7) An example introduction, internal paragraph and conclusion 8) The importance of linking paragraphs 9) The importance of using evidence and different forms of evidence 10) A final writing task 11) Self-reflection The whole powerpoint is likely to last over an hour. The sample paragraphs are also included on a separate sheet so learners can annotate them. There is reference to AQA 8700/2/Question 5 but it could be adapted to other boards.
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GCSE Baseline Test

GCSE Baseline Test

This basline test combines the exam structure of AQA 8700/1 with an allegedly true account of one man's experience of being buried alive in the 19th Century. You may wish to use it to provide a 'starting point' for GCSE study. There are all five questions and the recommended time is 1 hour and 45 minutes. This could be split over two lessons. Following on from one users's comments, I feel it is necessary to point out that I have not included a mark scheme here - this is simply the text and the questions. I tend to use AQA's sample mark scheme, available on their website, for activities such as this.
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Writing to Argue: Footballers Need to be Readers

Writing to Argue: Footballers Need to be Readers

This PowerPoint is based on a recent Guardian article, 'Why reading books can help you become a better footballer'. Students revise the terms included in AFOREST (some prior teaching is assumed) and then embark on a question in the style of an AQA, 8700/2 Question 5. The task is for students to argue the case for/against a choice of statements on the same theme as the base text.
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Broadsheet Article Writing for GCSE

Broadsheet Article Writing for GCSE

A lesson aimed at middle-upper ability GCSE groups preparing for English Language. Learners examine the differences between broadsheet and tabloid newspapers and the concept of the broadsheet article as opposed to the news report. This is followed by a section on the features of a broadsheet article including heading, strapline, etc. Learners read, label and analyse examples of broadsheet articles (these are differentiated) and then write their own, based on a choice of 6 possible tasks. A prompt sheet is included for learners to use as they are in the process of writing. This lesson is not tailored towards any particular board but provides learners with an understanding of what is required when writing a broadsheet article.
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Speech Writing for GCSE

Speech Writing for GCSE

An extended lesson on writing the text of a persuasive speech, aimed at middle-upper ability GCSE groups. The lesson covers: 1) The purpose of a speech 2) AFOREST techniques inc. a cut-up, match and stick activity 3) Links to example speeches (differentiated for ability) 3) A speech-writing task (differentiated for ability) I would set aside about 2 hours for these activities in total, with approximately 45 minutes dedicated to independent writing. This lesson is not tailored towards any particular board but provides learners with an understanding of what is required when writing a persuasive speech.
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Transactional Writing Bundle for GCSE

Transactional Writing Bundle for GCSE

Purchase lessons on three forms of transactional writing: broadsheet articles, speeches and leaflets. Ideal for middle ability groups.
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Leaflet Writing for GCSE

Leaflet Writing for GCSE

A PowerPoint that covers leaflet writing for GCSE. It is aimed at middle-ability learners working towards an extended response to a task such as 'Write the text of a leaflet for...' The lesson covers 1) the purpose and structure of a leaflet 2) Persuasive language features (FOREST) 3) Modal and imperative verbs. 3) Leaflets with a multi purpose. There is an extended writing task at the end where learners have to work out the purpose and audience for themselves.
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AQA GCSE English Language Paper 2: Comparing 19th and 21st Century Texts

AQA GCSE English Language Paper 2: Comparing 19th and 21st Century Texts

A short unit of work that helps to prepare learners for AQA GCSE English Language Paper 2 (8700/2). Source A is an extract from 'White Slavery in London', published in 1888. Source B is an article published in 2013 about working conditions in an Amazon warehouse. A link to this is text is provided. The powerpoint contains questions 1-4, each with its own sample answer. If you can obtain a copy of the Paper 1 mark scheme, you may wish to ask learners to mark the sample answers provided.
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Jekyll and Hyde  Study Pack

Jekyll and Hyde Study Pack

Buy the two Jekyll and Hyde student workbooks and the character mindmaps in one useful bundle, saving 10%. NB. To view the mind maps, you will need access to Active Inspire software.
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Jekyll and Hyde Higher Workbook

Jekyll and Hyde Higher Workbook

A 44-page workbook containing a range of activities on 'Jekyll and Hyde'. Some of the activities are slightly on the difficult side so this resource is recommended for middle-upper KS4 groups. Appropriate worksheets are included. This workbook is ideal for learners whose aim is both comprehension and anaylsis of the novel.
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Using Humour, Sarcasm and Irony

Using Humour, Sarcasm and Irony

A lesson that introduces the concepts of humour, sarcasm and irony and how they can be used to entertain. Students examine the definitions of all three concepts, look at two examples and can then match up the sarcastic response to the appropriate question. This lesson is aimed at middle ability Year 9 learners. It uses an Active Inspire Flipchart, so please ensure that you have access to this software before you download.
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GCSE Article Writing Task

GCSE Article Writing Task

This lesson is based on the regular Guardian feature 'A Letter to...'. I have found that it generates some very emotive and well-written pieces, even from the slightly more disengaged. Students read an example, highlighting the areas of strength, before composing a list of their own success criteria. The writing task is to produce their own 'letter they always wanted to write' with an opportunity for peer assessment later. The peer assessment is based broadly on the mark scheme for AQA 8700/2 Question 5, but can be adapted for different boards.
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