Primary Source American History - 2017-18 edition

Primary Source American History - 2017-18 edition

Primary Source American History is a workbook in the form of a toolbox of teacher assignments. The main idea behind it is to create a large number of primary source readings – 92 in total – that can be assigned to U.S. History students in high school or as part of a university core survey course on U.S. History. But this workbook contains a variety of teacher resources, including: 92 primary source reading assignments, Eight research and documentation projects (six papers, a PowerPoint presentation and a video), 22 unit vocabulary lists 28 review worksheets, Three Mock Trials (two criminal and one civil) and Two Mock Congresses (with speech/paper). All of the assignments are in print-ready format. Because it is a digital text in MS Word DOC format, they are adaptable to your classroom preferences. Moreover, it's easy for the teacher purchasing this to post the first 740-odd pages on a school password-protected school intranet to use as a textbook supplement. (You may want to withhold the Mock Trials and Mock Congress for the appropriate time.) All of the primary source readings have a series of questions at the end, which are generally a mix of reading comprehension, student opinion, Document-Based Questions, and – whenever possible – links to current events. The primary source documents are a necessity for the honors-level students at the college preparatory high school where I teach, as most are tracked to take the College Board's AP U.S. History exam. As such, I give them the document-based questions (DBQs) at the end of the texts (marked with a “►”) as preparation for the kind of questions they'll likely encounter in the AP exam. This second, expanded edition for the 2017-18 school year contains an additional 150 pages of material not in the 2015 edition. In this second edition, I've included more readings about Native Americans, immigration and economics. I've also added the Mock Congress on cell phone surveillance, a research paper for the Thoreau era, and my best-selling Mock Trial: The Tornado (based upon Ruben “The Hurricane” Carter). Finally, I've tried to update the questions to readings in the first edition in order to to relate them to current events as much as possible. – Thomas R. Eddlem The full index of readings (with writers and works) is available on my Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/teddlem/primary-source-american-history-2nd-edition-2017-1/
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The World Speaks: Primary Source Modern World History

The World Speaks: Primary Source Modern World History

The World Speaks is a workbook in the form of a toolbox of teacher assignments for World History from 1750 to present. The main idea behind it is to create a large number of primary source readings – 41 in total – that can be assigned to World History students in high school or as part of a university core survey course on World History. This workbook contains: 41 primary source reading assignments, Six research and documentation projects (four papers, a GooglePresentation and a video) A short simulation on the beginning of World War One 10 unit vocabulary lists 10 review worksheets All of the assignments are in print-ready format. Because it is a digital text in MS Word DOC format, they are adaptable to your classroom preferences. All of the primary source readings have a series of questions at the end, which are generally a mix of reading comprehension, student opinion, Document-Based Questions, and – whenever possible – links to current events. The document-based questions (DBQs) at the end of the texts (marked with a “►”) can serve as preparation for the kind of questions they'll likely encounter in the AP exam. – Thomas R. Eddlem The full index of readings (with writers and works) is available on my Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/teddlem/the-world-speaks-world-history-since-1750-using-pr/
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Mock Trial: The Case of the After-Prom Party

Mock Trial: The Case of the After-Prom Party

Mock trial for class of 15-40 students The scenario is this: Six students engage in an after-prom party where there is some drinking of alcohol and widespread marijuana smoking, and two of the students are involved in a fatal car crash driving home from the party at approximately 3:30 a.m. the following morning. The goals of this mock trial are: 1. to teach students how civil trials work, what joint and several liability is, and what compensatory and punitive damages are. 2. to provide an opportunity to engage the students in a serious and science-based, student-led discussion about impaired driving, specifically driving after consuming marijuana and/or alcohol. Contains: 13 Witness/attorney profile sheets and instructions Common Courtroom Objections reference sheet Jury worksheet Rubrics Map to Mass. State Social Studies Standards and Common Core Standards This mock trial is an accordion trial: You can do it with as few as 15 students, or as many as 40 students. For trials with small classes, I have drawn my juries from study hall volunteers, a larger “outside audience” which adds an incentive for students in my classes to take the trial seriously. Alternatively, you could just have a bench trial where the judge decides the case. Also, you can adjust the number of attorneys on each side from 1-3 based upon the class size. - Thomas R Eddlem
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World History -- Age of Revolution -- Primary Source Readings

World History -- Age of Revolution -- Primary Source Readings

This is a unit of primary source readings for world history students at the high school or university level and other content for the Age of Revolution (1776-1848). The five primary source readings include 6-12 questions at the end of each reading that combine reading comprehension, links to current government issues and Document-Based-Questions (marked with a "►"). Contents include: 1. The Order of Illuminati: John Robison's "Proofs of a Conspiracy" (excerpts) 2. English Views of the French Revolution: MP Edmund Burke, Rev. David Price (both excerpts) 3. Worksheet on Comparison/Contrast of French with American revolution 4. Haitian Revolution: Toussaint's letter to the French Directory (excerpts) 5. Venezuelan Revolution: Simon Bolivar's "Cartegena Manifesto" 6. The Communist Manifesto (excerpts): Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels 7. Age of Revolution Historical Impact Presentation (Google Slides project) 8. Unit study guide with key concepts, vocabulary list and practice test The readings can be used for in-class lessons, sub-plans or homework assignments. They're ideal for a World History AP course, though I use them for my standard-level students as well. (The Communist Manifesto reading is too advanced for standard level high school students as a homework assignment, so I do it in class.)
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The Great Depression -- Primary Source Readings -- U.S. and World History

The Great Depression -- Primary Source Readings -- U.S. and World History

This is a compilation of key primary source readings for understanding the Great Depression of the 1930s and the New Deal in a U.S. History class. The packet includes the following primary source readings: 1. David Ricardo and the Theory of Competitive Advantage: From On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation (1817) 2. The Smoot-Hawley Tariff: Sen. Reed Smoot, Sen. John William "Elmer" Thomas 3. Economics of the Great Depression: John Maynard Keynes, Frederic Bastiat 4. A Study in Fascism: John T. Flynn's As We Go Marching (1944) 5. The Evolution of the Supreme Court During the New Deal: Schechter v. US (1935), Wickard v. Filburn (1942) 6. Roosevelt's Fireside Chat on the Economy (1938) Also contains: Research paper on the Great Depression with instructions, links and rubric Unit vocabulary list and two practice worksheets Note: These readings along with more than 90 others are included in my book Primary Source American History, along with three mock trials, two mock congresses and several dozen projects review worksheets. If you like this (or the free readings on my store), consider getting the complete set.
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Cold War and Decolonization Primary Source Readings -- World History

Cold War and Decolonization Primary Source Readings -- World History

This is a series of primary source readings on decolonization and the Cold War period (1945-65) for a World History course at the high school or university survey course level. The five primary source readings include 6-15 questions at the end of each reading that combine reading comprehension, links to current government issues and Document-Based-Questions (marked with a "►"). Contents include: 1. "The Sinews of Peace" Iron Curtain speech - Winston Churchill (1946) 2. "Quit India" speech - Mahatma Gandhi (1942) 3. Banana Republics and the Guatamalan Coup of 1954 - Gen. Smedley Butler's "I Was a Racketeer" speech (1936), declassified CIA memorandum (1997) 4. Congo's Struggle for Independence (1960-63) -- King Baudouin I, Patrice Lumumba, 46 Angry Men, UN Security Council, Belgian Commission on the Assassination of Patrice Lumumba 5. Nelson Mandela's speech at Rivonia (1964) 6. Review questions for Movie "China Cry" 7. Unit vocabulary and concept list with a practice test worksheet The readings can be used for in-class lessons, sub-plans or homework assignments. They're ideal for a World History AP course, though I use them for my standard-level students as well.
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World War Two -- Primary Source Readings -- U.S. and World History

World War Two -- Primary Source Readings -- U.S. and World History

This is a series of primary source readings on imperialism for a World History course at the high school or university survey course level. The three primary source readings include 7-13 questions at the end of each reading that combine reading comprehension, links to current government issues and Document-Based-Questions (marked with a "►"). Contents include: 1. The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and the beginning of World War Two: Joachim von Ribbentrop, Adolf Hitler (1939) 2. Battle of Britain: "The Few" speech by Winston Churchill (1940) 3. Korematsu v. U.S. and civil liberties in wartime (1942) 4. Atomic bomb research presentation and persuasive essay project 5. Unit vocabulary and concept list with a practice test worksheet The readings can be used for in-class lessons, sub-plans or homework assignments. They're ideal for a World History AP course, though I use them for my standard-level students as well. 33 pages total.
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Industrial Revolution -- Primary Source Readings -- World History

Industrial Revolution -- Primary Source Readings -- World History

This is a series of primary source readings on the industrial revolution for a World History course at the high school or university survey course level. The four primary source readings include 4-15 questions at the end of each reading that combine reading comprehension, links to current government issues and Document-Based-Questions (marked with a "►"). Contents include: 1. Adam Smith from The Wealth of Nations on the division of labor (1776) 2. Sadler Report on Child Labor excerpts (1832) 3. Parliamentary debate on the Sadler bill (1832) 4. David Ricardo on the Theory of Competitive Advantage (1817) 5. Short project/paper on source documentation 6. Unit vocabulary and concept list with a practice test worksheet The readings can be used for in-class lessons, sub-plans or homework assignments. They're ideal for a World History AP course, though I use them for my standard-level students as well.
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Reagan-Carter Era Primary Source Readings

Reagan-Carter Era Primary Source Readings

This packet includes three groupings of primary source readings during the Carter and Reagan presidencies, a chapter vocabulary list (which corresponds with the Pearson Education's U.S. History books, with some supplemental terms), and a chapter review worksheet based on the vocabulary list. The primary source readings are on: The Iran Hostage Crisis: Declassified CIA memo on the 1953 Mossadegh coup (excerpts), Robert C. Ode's diary as a hostage (excerpts), Ayatollah Khomeini's rationale for keeping U.S. hostages (excerpts), President Carter's address to the nation on the crisis. Iran-Contra Affiar: Text of Boland Amendment, Robert Gates' 1984 Memo on Nicaragua, Reagan address to the nation on Nicaraguan Contra aid, Congressman Michael Barnes speech against Contra aid. Reaganomics: Reagan Library claims, Sen. Joseph Biden 1987 speech against Reaganomics, Murray Rothbard critique of Reaganomics. Each reading contains 8-11 document-based questions that could be used as an essay assignment or as separate questions requiring single paragraph responses. Each of these readings could be a solid homework assignment, sub plan, or class discussion (after students have read the documents). 29 pages total. Note: These readings along with more than 90 others are included in my book “Primary Source American History,” along with three mock trials, two mock congresses and several dozen projects review worksheets. If you like this (or the free readings on my store), consider getting the complete set.
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World War One -- Primary Source Readings -- U.S. and World History

World War One -- Primary Source Readings -- U.S. and World History

This is a series of primary source readings for students taking a U.S. history course to learn about U.S. involvement in the First World War, and the rejection of the Versailles Treaty and League of Nations by the United States. The packet includes the following primary source readings: 1. The Zimmermann Telegram and President Woodrow Wilson's address to Congress asking for a declaration of war against Germany 2. "The State" by Randolph Bourne 3. Woodrow Wilson's "14 Points" speech 4. Irreconcilables and the League of Nations Treaty: League of Nations charter, speech by Senator William Borah Also contains: Unit vocabulary list and review worksheet, worksheet for movie Joyeux Noel 33 pages total Note: These readings along with more than 90 others are included in my book Primary Source American History, along with three mock trials, two mock congresses and several dozen projects review worksheets. If you like this (or the free readings on my store), consider getting the complete set.
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Issues of the Trump Presidency -- Primary Source Readings

Issues of the Trump Presidency -- Primary Source Readings

This grouping of eight primary source U.S. history readings relate to current issues during the beginning months of the Trump Presidency. They don't involve President Trump directly, but are historical perspectives on the issues he's raised: international trade, multilateral trade agreements, sanctuary cities, infrastructure spending, immigration, and warrantless surveillance. 1. Alien Acts of 1798:Congressman Samuel Sewall, Congressman Albert Gallatin, Madison's Report of 1800, Maine Gov. John Baldacci's "sanctuary" declaration in 2005 2. Know-Nothing era immigration issues: Samuel Morse, Congressman John Smith Chipman 3. Immigration in the 1920s: Congressmen Percy Quin and William "Bourke" Cockran, Summary of Johnson-Reed Act 4. Infrastructure spending and the economy: John Maynard Keynes' "General Theory," Frederick Bastiat's "What is Seen and What Is Unseen" 5. International Trade: David Ricardo's Theory of Comparative Advantage from "On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation" 6. The Smoot-Hawley Bill and the Protective Tariff: Sen. Reed Smoot, Sen. John William “Elmer” Thomas 7. NAFTA Agreement: H. Ross Perot, Vice President Al Gore, President George H.W. Bush, Rep. David Dreier, Rep. Richard Gephardt, Rep. Helen Bentley 8. Intelligence and Privacy after 9/11: Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, President Barack Obama, Rep. Justin Amash, Sen. Tom Cotton, Sen. Dianne Feinstein These readings are a great way to teach U.S. history and link it to current events or teach current events in a deeper and more historical way!
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Joyeux Noel (movie) Worksheet -- with answer sheet

Joyeux Noel (movie) Worksheet -- with answer sheet

Joyeux Noel is one of the greatest movies ever made, and I like to show it just before introducing a U.S. History segment on World War One. My wife, a French teacher, also shows it in her French classes. This worksheet has a variety of content-based questions requiring 1-3 sentence answers, along with a few that require outside research on the topics of international law and other issues. The questions are designed for a U.S. history class, but can be adapted for the cultural aspects of a French or German language class. Questions preceded with a “►” can be used as DBQs for longer 5x5 essays. – Thomas R. Eddlem
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Imperialism Modern World History Primary Source Readings

Imperialism Modern World History Primary Source Readings

This is a series of primary source readings on imperialism for a World History course at the high school or university survey course level. The four primary source readings include 7-15 questions at the end of each reading that combine reading comprehension, links to current government issues and Document-Based-Questions (marked with a "►"). Contents include: 1. The Indian Thuggee Cult in British India and Efforts to Exterminate It: WIlliam Henry Sleeman 2. The Opium Wars of China: Lin Zexu, Treaty of Nanjing 3. The Casement Report on the Belgian Congo: Roger Casement 4. The Philippine Insurrection and Empire: Rudyard Kipling's "The White Man's Burden," American Anti-Imperialist League, Mark Twain, Houston Post 5. Unit vocabulary and concept list with a practice test worksheet The readings can be used for in-class lessons, sub-plans or homework assignments. They're ideal for a World History AP course, though I use them for my standard-level students as well.
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Age of Nationalism (1860-1900)  Primary Source Readings World History

Age of Nationalism (1860-1900) Primary Source Readings World History

This is a series of primary source readings on nationalism for a World History course at the high school or university survey course level. The three primary source readings include 7-13 questions at the end of each reading that combine reading comprehension, links to current government issues and Document-Based-Questions (marked with a "►"). Contents include: 1. Italy's Risorgimento: Guiseppi Girabaldi and Pope Pius IX 2. German Unification: Otto von Bismark's "Thoughts and Reminiscences" 3. The Russo-Japanese War: Japanese declaration of war, Russian response 4. Unit vocabulary and concept list with a practice test worksheet The readings can be used for in-class lessons, sub-plans or homework assignments. They're ideal for a World History AP course, though I use them for my standard-level students as well. 18 pages total.
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The World Speaks: Primary Source Modern World History

The World Speaks: Primary Source Modern World History

The World Speaks is a workbook in the form of a toolbox of teacher assignments for World History from 1750 to present. The main idea behind it is to create a large number of primary source readings – 41 in total – that can be assigned to World History students in high school or as part of a university core survey course on World History. This workbook contains: 41 primary source reading assignments, Six research and documentation projects (four papers, a GooglePresentation and a video) A short simulation on the beginning of World War One 10 unit vocabulary lists 10 review worksheets All of the assignments are in print-ready format. Because it is a digital text in MS Word DOC format, they are adaptable to your classroom preferences. All of the primary source readings have a series of questions at the end, which are generally a mix of reading comprehension, student opinion, Document-Based Questions, and – whenever possible – links to current events. The document-based questions (DBQs) at the end of the texts (marked with a “►”) can serve as preparation for the kind of questions they'll likely encounter in the AP exam. – Thomas R. Eddlem The full index of readings (with writers and works) is available on my Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/teddlem/the-world-speaks-world-history-since-1750-using-pr/
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Mock Trial: The Tornado (A murder trial based upon Reuben "The Hurricane" Carter)

Mock Trial: The Tornado (A murder trial based upon Reuben "The Hurricane" Carter)

Mock trial for class of 12-31 students This mock trial is loosely based upon the facts of the case of Rubin “the Hurricane” Carter, and some of the actual grand jury testimony (modified slightly) in that case is used in this mock trial. I've used this mock trial for standard-level as well as honors-level high school students. Interestingly enough, the standard-level students get into the trial more fervently than the honors kids. Contains: 12 Witness profile sheets and instructions Attorney packets Judge profile sheet Jury worksheet Rubrics Map to Mass. State Social Studies Standards and Common Core Standards This mock trial is an accordion trial: You can do it with as few as a dozen students, and I've done it with as many as 31 students. For trials with small classes, I have drawn my juries from study hall volunteers, a larger “outside audience” which adds an incentive for students in my classes to take the trial seriously. Alternatively, you could just have a bench trial where the judge decides the case. There are certain witnesses that can be eliminated or consolidated for smaller classes, and they are marked as such, and you can adjust the number of attorneys on each side from 1-3 based upon the class size. - Thomas R Eddlem Note: This mock trial is part of my book "Primary Source American History," as are two of my other mock trials. If you like this (or the free readings on my store), consider getting the complete set by ordering the electronic book as well.
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Mock Trial: The Case of the After-Prom Party

Mock Trial: The Case of the After-Prom Party

Mock trial for class of 15-40 students The scenario is this: Six students engage in an after-prom party where there is some drinking of alcohol and widespread marijuana smoking, and two of the students are involved in a fatal car crash driving home from the party at approximately 3:30 a.m. the following morning. The goals of this mock trial are: 1. to teach students how civil trials work, what joint and several liability is, and what compensatory and punitive damages are. 2. to provide an opportunity to engage the students in a serious and science-based, student-led discussion about impaired driving, specifically driving after consuming marijuana and/or alcohol. Contains: 13 Witness/attorney profile sheets and instructions Common Courtroom Objections reference sheet Jury worksheet Rubrics Map to Mass. State Social Studies Standards and Common Core Standards This mock trial is an accordion trial: You can do it with as few as 15 students, or as many as 40 students. For trials with small classes, I have drawn my juries from study hall volunteers, a larger “outside audience” which adds an incentive for students in my classes to take the trial seriously. Alternatively, you could just have a bench trial where the judge decides the case. Also, you can adjust the number of attorneys on each side from 1-3 based upon the class size. - Thomas R Eddlem
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Economics Primary Source Readings

Economics Primary Source Readings

Following are primary source readings on economics issues, with relevant questions at the end of the readings. These excerpts from classic texts are designed to be understandable to high school students, and make handy homework assignments or substitute plans in an economics or history class. 1. Adam Smith on the Industrial Revolution and the division of labor (1 1/2 pages) from "The Wealth of Nations." -- 4 questions 2. Economics of the Great Depression (7 pages) John Maynard Keynes' story of burying jars full of cash from "The General Theory" and Frederick Bastiat's broken window story from "That Which Is Seen and That Which Is Unseen." -- 16 questions 3. David Ricardo and the Theory of Comparative Advantage from "On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation" (3 1/2 pages) -- 10 questions 4. Child Labor in Britain: Sadler Commission Report (4 pages) -- 6 questions 5. Child Labor in Britain: Parliament debate on the Sadler bill (4 pages) -- 9 questions 6. Reaganomics: Economic Success or Failure? (7 pages) Excerpts from the Reagan Library, speech of Senator Joe Biden and column by economist Murray Rothbard. -- 8 questions
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News and Information Source Evaluation Packet

News and Information Source Evaluation Packet

Teaching students to evaluate the reliability and bias of information sources is one of the most important skills a Social Studies or English teacher can impart upon a student. The ability to assess the reliability of sources on the fly has become an increasingly vital skill in the age of the Internet, with the multiplication of sources available and the creation of click-bait “fake news” sources that deliberately package falsehoods as “news.” This packet contains the following: * A source evaluation Google Form (with answer sheet) for students to evaluate seven different news stories of varied quality. (takes ~45 min.) * A source evaluation paper (including a rubric) that uses peer review to have students analyze sources used in a prior class project: 1. Whether their classmates used a primary or secondary source, 2. Who the author is 3. Who the publisher is 4. Assess sources of bias, and 5. Assess special credentials such as education or experience * A primary source reading/webquest on the U.S. Supreme Court's "Citizens United" decision in 2010, followed by 18 questions that link the decision to source reliability, current events and media bias. (Takes about 2-3 hours, can be a sub-plan or homework assignment.) * Eight hyperlinks to graphics that I print and put up in my classroom, and a video I like to use.
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Primary Source American History - 2017-18 edition

Primary Source American History - 2017-18 edition

Primary Source American History is a workbook in the form of a toolbox of teacher assignments. The main idea behind it is to create a large number of primary source readings – 92 in total – that can be assigned to U.S. History students in high school or as part of a university core survey course on U.S. History. But this workbook contains a variety of teacher resources, including: 92 primary source reading assignments, Eight research and documentation projects (six papers, a PowerPoint presentation and a video), 22 unit vocabulary lists 28 review worksheets, Three Mock Trials (two criminal and one civil) and Two Mock Congresses (with speech/paper). All of the assignments are in print-ready format. Because it is a digital text in MS Word DOC format, they are adaptable to your classroom preferences. Moreover, it's easy for the teacher purchasing this to post the first 740-odd pages on a school password-protected school intranet to use as a textbook supplement. (You may want to withhold the Mock Trials and Mock Congress for the appropriate time.) All of the primary source readings have a series of questions at the end, which are generally a mix of reading comprehension, student opinion, Document-Based Questions, and – whenever possible – links to current events. The primary source documents are a necessity for the honors-level students at the college preparatory high school where I teach, as most are tracked to take the College Board's AP U.S. History exam. As such, I give them the document-based questions (DBQs) at the end of the texts (marked with a “►”) as preparation for the kind of questions they'll likely encounter in the AP exam. This second, expanded edition for the 2017-18 school year contains an additional 150 pages of material not in the 2015 edition. In this second edition, I've included more readings about Native Americans, immigration and economics. I've also added the Mock Congress on cell phone surveillance, a research paper for the Thoreau era, and my best-selling Mock Trial: The Tornado (based upon Ruben “The Hurricane” Carter). Finally, I've tried to update the questions to readings in the first edition in order to to relate them to current events as much as possible. – Thomas R. Eddlem The full index of readings (with writers and works) is available on my Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/teddlem/primary-source-american-history-2nd-edition-2017-1/
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M&M Inflation Game Role Play

M&M Inflation Game Role Play

Purpose: To demonstrate the impact of inflation on prices, and Gresham's law. Length: 30-40 minutes (or longer, if vigorous conversation) Materials needed: 2-5 lb. Bag of M&M candies (or Skittles, etc.) Box of small ziplock baggies, putting five M&Ms in each bag, with five baggies for each student Printouts of “M&M Bucks,” five coupons for each student (attached below is a sheet with 6 on each page) plus the same number (as the whole class) more for “government.” 3 pages total.
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21st Century History Primary Source Documents (Bush/Obama era)

21st Century History Primary Source Documents (Bush/Obama era)

This packet includes the following primary source readings on the following topics: 1. Intelligence and Privacy After 9/11: Pres. Obama, Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.), Rep. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Cal.) 2. The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare): Pres. Obama, Rep. Dan Burton (R-Ind.), Rep. Ron Paul (R-Tex.), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Supreme Court majority, concurrence and dissent in NFIB v. Sebelius. 3. Excerpts from 9/11 Commission Report, including sections of the 28 pages declassified in 2016 4. Vocabulary list and Practice Test worksheet All primary source readings have 10-12 questions on the document, and can be used as homework, sub-plans or (next day) for classroom discussion.
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M&M Inflation Game Demonstration (Economics)

M&M Inflation Game Demonstration (Economics)

Purpose: To demonstrate the impact of inflation on prices, and Gresham's law. Length: 30-40 minutes (or longer, if vigorous conversation) Materials needed: 2-5 lb. Bag of M&M candies (or Skittles, etc.) Box of small ziplock baggies, putting five M&Ms in each bag, with five baggies for each student Printouts of “M&M Bucks,” five coupons for each student (attached below is a sheet with 6 on each page) plus the same number (as the whole class) more for “government.”
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