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Mr S or otherwise know online as @TechMenace. I teach Computing Science up to Advanced Higher/A Level and am also a FireFighter. I have taught in both English and Scottish schools and have worked with a wide range of exam bodies.

Mr S or otherwise know online as @TechMenace. I teach Computing Science up to Advanced Higher/A Level and am also a FireFighter. I have taught in both English and Scottish schools and have worked with a wide range of exam bodies.
The 'ready to go' Small Basic Unit
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The 'ready to go' Small Basic Unit

7 Resources
With this bundle you should have everything you need to teach an introduction to textual languages using Small Basic. Small Basic can be download for free from Microsoft and its teaching with the combined resources always resorts in a very engaged set of S3s/Y9s. Small Basic is excellent scaffolding to get pupils coding in Python. ‘half off the pie?’ - Better than half price when bought as a bundle.
Small Basic - Lesson 4 - traffic lights
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Small Basic - Lesson 4 - traffic lights

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**Small Basic - Lesson 4 **- Traffic lights In this series of lessons we will take pupils from no experience of Small Basic to a good understanding with the skills to solve problems and think algorithmically in Small Basic. Students should enter this scheme of work with a basic understanding of computational thinking, having some graphical based language experience such as Scratch, Kodu, HourOfCode, etc. In addition to other expectations, this lesson benefits from being proceeded with a lesson on Flowcharts or Pseudocode. Pupils recap their planning skills before coding. Support pupils by issuing some paper and pencils do they can keep track of the Turtles position vs their drawing. This is particularly useful for meeting the needs of teaching a text based programming language based on (KS3 in England / BGE in Scotland) outcomes and is a strong foundation/scaffolding to supporting students to program in Python in following units. For the less confident teacher I have included a bunch of pre-written Small Basic programs to demonstrate WAGOLL. In this lesson: Recap knowledge from previous lesson. Discuss Apple QuickDraw history - Steve Jobs demanded a computer be able to draw shapes, specifically the RoundRect current seen as App icons on iOS Revisit the features of the Small Basic IDE Discuss manual vs automated drawing of shapes Introduce new code blocks Challenge - to build a functioning traffic light using new code blocks Two challenging extension tasks - double traffic lights and revisiting chessboard
Small Basic - Lesson 2 - house challenge
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Small Basic - Lesson 2 - house challenge

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**Small Basic - Lesson 2 **- House challenge In this series of lessons we will take pupils from no experience of Small Basic to a good understanding with the skills to solve problems and think algorithmically in Small Basic. Students should enter this scheme of work with a basic understanding of computational thinking, having some graphical based language experience such as Scratch, Kodu, HourOfCode, etc. In addition to other expectations, this lesson benefits from being proceeded with a lesson on Flowcharts or Pseudocode. Pupils recap their planning skills before coding. Support pupils by issuing some paper and pencils do they can keep track of the Turtles position vs their drawing. This is particularly useful for meeting the needs of teaching a text based programming language based on (KS3 in England / BGE in Scotland) outcomes and is a strong foundation/scaffolding to supporting students to program in Python in following units. For the less confident teacher I have included a bunch of pre-written Small Basic programs to demonstrate WAGOLL. In this lesson: Recap knowledge from previous lesson. Discuss planning skills - flowcharts / pseudocode Revisit the features of the Small Basic IDE Debugging Sequencing Challenge - to build a house design
Small Basic - Lesson 1 - Introducing the language and shapes algorithms
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Small Basic - Lesson 1 - Introducing the language and shapes algorithms

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**Small Basic - Lesson 1 **- Introducing the language and shapes algorithms In this series of lessons we will take pupils from no experience of Small Basic to a good understanding with the skills to solve problems and think algorithmically in Small Basic. Students should enter this scheme of work with a basic understanding of computational thinking, having some graphical based language experience such as Scratch, Kodu, HourOfCode, etc. This is particularly useful for meeting the needs of teaching a text based programming language based on (KS3 in England / BGE in Scotland) outcomes and is a strong foundation/scaffolding to supporting students to program in Python in following units. For the less confident teacher I have included a bunch of pre-written Small Basic programs to demonstrate WAGOLL. In this lesson: Begin to understand what an EXE files is Meet the CLI and DOS Understand why Small Basic is much more powerful than Scratch Meeting the Small Basic IDE Hello World Meeting Turtle Basic shapes challenges Exploring more code using the Carousel Pupils are rewarded with a game at the end of the lesson Plenary - in a nutshell
Small Basic Challenge book including cheat sheet - plenary / summative assessment
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Small Basic Challenge book including cheat sheet - plenary / summative assessment

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Towards the end of teaching a coding language I like to give students the opportunity to challenge themselves at a level that suits them. Coding challenge books can leave pupils ‘in the pit’ and develop their resilience, debugging and problem solving skills in a way directed learning cannot. This short challenge book is designed to support S3/ Y9 students working on Small Basic. Usually pupils will have experience of a graphical language such as Scratch and have gained basic knowledge of Small Basic including: All students will have TextWindow GraphicsWindow Turtle Basic shape construction Draw and Fill shapes with Pen and Brush color Coordinates Sequencing Skills Basic loops Selection with IFs Ninja level students will have Nested loops Nested IFs Experimented with extra code from autocomplete Time Made in Publisher with space for your school logo at the top of page 1. Designed to be printing efficient on one sheet to reduce printing costs. Source file and PDF ready to print are both included. Part of my Small Basic SoW. Feedback or questions welcome at Twitter @TechMenace
Small Basic - Lesson 3 - chessboard challenge
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Small Basic - Lesson 3 - chessboard challenge

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**Small Basic - Lesson 3 **- Chessboard challenge In this series of lessons we will take pupils from no experience of Small Basic to a good understanding with the skills to solve problems and think algorithmically in Small Basic. Students should enter this scheme of work with a basic understanding of computational thinking, having some graphical based language experience such as Scratch, Kodu, HourOfCode, etc. In addition to other expectations, this lesson benefits from being proceeded with a lesson on Flowcharts or Pseudocode. Pupils recap their planning skills before coding. Support pupils by issuing some paper and pencils do they can keep track of the Turtles position vs their drawing. This is particularly useful for meeting the needs of teaching a text based programming language based on (KS3 in England / BGE in Scotland) outcomes and is a strong foundation/scaffolding to supporting students to program in Python in following units. For the less confident teacher I have included a bunch of pre-written Small Basic programs to demonstrate WAGOLL. In this lesson: Recap knowledge from previous lesson. Discuss planning skills - flowcharts / pseudocode Revisit the features of the Small Basic IDE Debugging Sequencing Challenge - to draw a chess board Pupils to consider the number of lines used to code their solution Teacher tracks most elegant solutions (square by square, zig zag lines, outwardly growing squares, etc)
Small Basic - Lesson 3 - snowman (xmas season lesson variant)
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Small Basic - Lesson 3 - snowman (xmas season lesson variant)

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**Small Basic - Lesson 3 **- snowman In this series of lessons we will take pupils from no experience of Small Basic to a good understanding with the skills to solve problems and think algorithmically in Small Basic. Students should enter this scheme of work with a basic understanding of computational thinking, having some graphical based language experience such as Scratch, Kodu, HourOfCode, etc. In addition to other expectations, this lesson benefits from being proceeded with a lesson on Flowcharts or Pseudocode. Pupils recap their planning skills before coding. Support pupils by issuing some paper and pencils do they can keep track of the Turtles position vs their drawing. This is particularly useful for meeting the needs of teaching a text based programming language based on (KS3 in England / BGE in Scotland) outcomes and is a strong foundation/scaffolding to supporting students to program in Python in following units. For the less confident teacher I have included a bunch of pre-written Small Basic programs to demonstrate WAGOLL. In this lesson: Recap knowledge from previous lesson. Discuss planning skills - flowcharts / pseudocode Revisit the features of the Small Basic IDE Debugging Sequencing Challenge - to draw a snowman (this is an xmas variant of lesson 3 - chessboard) Pupils to consider the number of lines used to code their solution Teacher tracks most elegant solutions (square by square, zig zag lines, outwardly growing squares, etc)
Small Basic - Lesson 5 - Turing Test
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Small Basic - Lesson 5 - Turing Test

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**Small Basic - Lesson 5 **- Turing Test In this series of lessons we will take pupils from no experience of Small Basic to a good understanding with the skills to solve problems and think algorithmically in Small Basic. Students should enter this scheme of work with a basic understanding of computational thinking, having some graphical based language experience such as Scratch, Kodu, HourOfCode, etc. In addition to other expectations, this lesson benefits from being proceeded with a lesson on Flowcharts or Pseudocode. Pupils recap their planning skills before coding. This is particularly useful for meeting the needs of teaching a text based programming language based on (KS3 in England / BGE in Scotland) outcomes and is a strong foundation/scaffolding to supporting students to program in Python in following units. For the less confident teacher I have included a bunch of pre-written Small Basic programs to demonstrate WAGOLL. In this lesson: Recap knowledge from previous lesson. Introduce Alan Turing and the Turing Test. Demonstrate some chatbots and discuss their business use case. Discuss IFs and how they behave like a rollercoaster loop. Demonstrate TextWindow.Read() Create basic responses to inputs. Have a go at talking to a advanced ChatBot Challenge pupils to create a simple Turing Test Chatbot
Scratch Lists - Introduction to using Arrays - Library Game
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Scratch Lists - Introduction to using Arrays - Library Game

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**Scratch - Lists **- Teaching simple lists/arrays In this Scratch lesson we take pupils from no experience of Scratch to a good understanding with the skills to solve problems and think algorithmically. Students should enter this scheme of work with a very basic understanding of how games are designed, having some graphical based language experience such as Scratch, Kodu, HourOfCode, etc is a benefit. In addition to other expectations, this lesson is not expected to be the first lesson in a series of Scratch lessons, it would be innapppriate for those with no Scratch experience to start at this point, for example this lesson is lesson 5 in my Scratch SoW and pupils should already have some experience with using a Variable in Scratch. Support pupils by issuing them with the two Lists supports sheets included in the Support ZIP. This is particularly useful for meeting the needs of teaching a graphical block based programming language based on (KS3 in England / BGE in Scotland) outcomes and is a strong foundation/scaffolding to supporting students to program in a text based programming language in following units. For the less confident teacher I have included a bunch of complete programs to demonstrate WAGOLL, see the Teacher ZIP. In this lesson: Brain teaser bell activity. Big question - if a variable can store a name, how do we store a whole class of names? Revisit the features of the Scratch IDE Look back at Variables and introduce the Lists options Common problems - pupils should pay particular attention to the instructions on page 2 that relates to Spot1, Spot2 and Spot3, the code is given once and they must change the code to suit each spot. Challenge - to build a game following a set of instructions from a help sheet Reflection extension tasks - pupils answer questions relating to game engagement and playability