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Thomas Molloy's Shop

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I'm a Head of Geography at a 11-16 secondary school in Leicestershire, UK. I enjoy creating lessons that students enjoy - so you will not find reams of text on the board for them to read or for you to transmit. I believe in a range of engaging activities per lesson.

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I'm a Head of Geography at a 11-16 secondary school in Leicestershire, UK. I enjoy creating lessons that students enjoy - so you will not find reams of text on the board for them to read or for you to transmit. I believe in a range of engaging activities per lesson.
3. What is the climate of the Middle East
tmm1979tmm1979

3. What is the climate of the Middle East

(0)
A lesson examining the climate zones of the Middle East. The lesson examined differential heating, air pressure and air masses affecting the region and includes map and climate graph skills. This is a part of a fully-resourced unit with a range of styles of activity and unashamedly embracing aspects of thinking skills (they still work) and dual coding. The unit was designed for Y9 and synoptically revises their KS3 course whilst using skills and concepts from their KS4 Geography studies (specifically, for Eduqas Geography B but relevant to all boards).
12. Why is the population of the Middle East so diverse?
tmm1979tmm1979

12. Why is the population of the Middle East so diverse?

(0)
This lesson examines ethincity and the development of faiths in the region, including the Sunni/Shia divide and the impacts this has today. A compound bar chart activity is used to examine faith groups in each country in the region. This is a part of a fully-resourced unit with a range of styles of activity and unashamedly embracing aspects of thinking skills (they still work) and dual coding. The unit was designed for Y9 and synoptically revises their KS3 course whilst using skills and concepts from their KS4 Geography studies (specifically, for Eduqas Geography B but relevant to all boards).
16. What solutions are there for Israel and Palestine?
tmm1979tmm1979

16. What solutions are there for Israel and Palestine?

(0)
A lesson examining the advantages and disadvantages of three proposed solutions to the Israel-Palestine issue through a DME activity. This is a part of a fully-resourced unit with a range of styles of activity and unashamedly embracing aspects of thinking skills (they still work) and dual coding. The unit was designed for Y9 and synoptically revises their KS3 course whilst using skills and concepts from their KS4 Geography studies (specifically, for Eduqas Geography B but relevant to all boards).
5. How important are Asia's rivers?
tmm1979tmm1979

5. How important are Asia's rivers?

(0)
Intended for Y8 but suitable for Y9, this lesson is part of a fully-resourced synoptic unit about Asia designed to draw together pupils’ learning from the past two years in Geography. The unit includes elements of coasts, rivers, climate change, development, urbanisation and looks at more challenging and contemporary issues such as the roots of the development gap between North and South Korea and also the abuse of Uighers in China. This lesson introduces the location and discharge of the major Asian rivers. Pupils are reminded of the key elements of their ‘Rivers’ unit (studied earlier but not required as this can also form an introduction to rivers). They create a scatter graph to plot discharge vs. areas of the drainage basis to establish if there is any correlation. They consider what other factors might influence discharge before looking at population density of Asia and considering how water supply might be related to this. The lesson ends with a video on the importance of the Yangtze River.
Development: 16. Microfinance
tmm1979tmm1979

Development: 16. Microfinance

(0)
This is part of a fully resourced scheme of work for the Eduqas GCSE (9-1) Geography specification, although it is easily adaptable for other specifications. Each lesson has all materials provided (with YouTube links) and is ready to teach out-of-the-box. This lesson uses the example of Kiva.com, a peer-to-peer microfinance lending platform to investigate the processes and impacts of microfinance.
5. Where do people live in the Middle East?
tmm1979tmm1979

5. Where do people live in the Middle East?

(0)
A lesson examining the population density of the Middle East, including the growth of cities. The main activity is a map task. This is a part of a fully-resourced unit with a range of styles of activity and unashamedly embracing aspects of thinking skills (they still work) and dual coding. The unit was designed for Y9 and synoptically revises their KS3 course whilst using skills and concepts from their KS4 Geography studies (specifically, for Eduqas Geography B but relevant to all boards).
Mass Extinction Events in History
tmm1979tmm1979

Mass Extinction Events in History

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The third lesson in a 13-lesson KS3 Geography unit about Endangered Species. All lessons are fully resourced with a range of engaging activities. This lesson introduces the history of extinction on Earth and the concept of ‘mass extinctions events’.
7. Why is there a development gap between North and South Korea?
tmm1979tmm1979

7. Why is there a development gap between North and South Korea?

(0)
Intended for Y8 but suitable for Y9, this lesson is part of a fully-resourced synoptic unit about Asia designed to draw together pupils’ learning from the past two years in Geography. The unit includes elements of coasts, rivers, climate change, development, urbanisation and looks at more challenging and contemporary issues such as the roots of the development gap between North and South Korea and also the abuse of Uighers in China. This lesson briefly introduces the history of conflict between the two Koreas and moves on rapidly to examine the impacts of this in terms of development indicators. Pupils they become familiar with the concept of an authoritarian dictatorship and personality cult. The role of internment camps is examined in some detail to hook pupils’ interest. Pupils examine if NK is indeed a communist country.
7. What are the impacts of climate change in the Middle East
tmm1979tmm1979

7. What are the impacts of climate change in the Middle East

(0)
A lesson examining a range of impacts of climate change on the region, possible consequences and “so what” reasoning to examine the scale and wider impacts. This is a part of a fully-resourced unit with a range of styles of activity and unashamedly embracing aspects of thinking skills (they still work) and dual coding. The unit was designed for Y9 and synoptically revises their KS3 course whilst using skills and concepts from their KS4 Geography studies (specifically, for Eduqas Geography B but relevant to all boards).
3. & 4. What factors affect climate and biomes in Asia
tmm1979tmm1979

3. & 4. What factors affect climate and biomes in Asia

(0)
Intended for Y8 but suitable for Y9, this lesson is part of a fully-resourced synoptic unit about Asia designed to draw together pupils’ learning from the past two years in Geography. The unit includes elements of coasts, rivers, climate change, development, urbanisation and looks at more challenging and contemporary issues such as the roots of the development gap between North and South Korea and also the abuse of Uighers in China. This is a two-lesson (possibly three if you wish) group task. In teams, pupils complete maps to show biomes/climate zones and precipitation in Asia. They are given maps to show average temperatures Jan and July and a series of photographs of biomes. There is also a jigsaw-based activity where they need to link up the climatic factors affecting biome distribution - best for more able members of the team. They then use this to create a poster to display in your classroom.
8. What is GIS and how is it useful to Geographers
tmm1979tmm1979

8. What is GIS and how is it useful to Geographers

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Introducing a basic GIS (Nat Geo Mapmaker). The lesson is from a Y7 introduction to Geography skill-based unit. It is fully resourced with a range of engaging activities to introduce pupils to the subject and its core skills. You will need access to an ICT suite for pupils to fully engage with the second half of this lesson. The lesson is from a Y7 introduction to Geography skill-based unit. It is fully resourced with a range of engaging activities to introduce pupils to the subject and its core skills.
Assessment: Geographical skills
tmm1979tmm1979

Assessment: Geographical skills

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The assessment for my Geographical Skills unit. The lesson is from a Y7 introduction to Geography skill-based unit. It is fully resourced with a range of engaging activities to introduce pupils to the subject and its core skills.
Geopolitics
tmm1979tmm1979

Geopolitics

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This lesson supports students’ wider global knowledge about geopolitics and international relations, why some countries cooperate and how political systems differ. This is designed to support their knowledge of issues such as aid and trade later in the Development unit. The lesson is fully resourced with engaging developmental activities.
11. How sustainable is Dubai?
tmm1979tmm1979

11. How sustainable is Dubai?

(0)
A lesson that examines the sustainability of Dubai using Egan’s Wheel. This is a part of a fully-resourced unit with a range of styles of activity and unashamedly embracing aspects of thinking skills (they still work) and dual coding. The unit was designed for Y9 and synoptically revises their KS3 course whilst using skills and concepts from their KS4 Geography studies (specifically, for Eduqas Geography B but relevant to all boards).
KS3 Asia Unit - Complete Bundle
tmm1979tmm1979

KS3 Asia Unit - Complete Bundle

9 Resources
Intended for Y8 but suitable for Y9, this is a fully-resourced synoptic unit about Asia designed to draw together pupils’ learning from the past two years in Geography. The unit includes elements of coasts, rivers, climate change, development, urbanisation and looks at more challenging and contemporary issues such as the roots of the development gap between North and South Korea and also the abuse of Uighers in China. Includes a cover lesson in the event of absence.
What do we know about endangered animals
tmm1979tmm1979

What do we know about endangered animals

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The first lesson in a 13-lesson KS3 Geography unit about Endangered Species. All lessons are fully resourced with a range of engaging activities. This lesson introduces the concept of endangered species by looking at the Tasmanian Tiger and busting some myths about the reasons for its extinction. Students are led to the standard conclusion that humans precipitated extinction of this species then presented with evidence through a card sort that will lead them to examine the role of climate change and biology in this case of extinction.
What is an endangered Species
tmm1979tmm1979

What is an endangered Species

(0)
The second lesson in a 13-lesson KS3 Geography unit about Endangered Species. All lessons are fully resourced with a range of engaging activities. This lesson introduces the various categories of extinction and prompts students to consider the basis requirements of a species in order to survive.
5. Causes-consequences-solutions of war
tmm1979tmm1979

5. Causes-consequences-solutions of war

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Intended forY9, this is a fully-resourced synoptic unit about international relations designed to support pupils as they move towards GCSE Geography. The unit examines international relations and the factors that affect these, superpowers, alliances, trade, hard- and soft-power, Belt and Road Initiative/debt-trap diplomacy, the causes, consequences and solutions of war and the role and efficacy of the UN. There is an optional final series of lessons to allow pupils to watch Hotel Rwanda to support their learning and provide a but of light relief at the very end of the year - the film is not provided and you should be sure to examine the accompanying PowerPoint that explains the premise to pupils and also states the exact time where the “N” word is used in the film so you can mute it. Pupils examine the main causes of war before investigating the positive and negative outcomes that arise from it. There is an engaging activity designed to promote their use of chains-of-reasoning (ready for GCSE Geography) to elaborate these points. Finally, the environmental impact of conflict is introduced.
2. What is a superpower?
tmm1979tmm1979

2. What is a superpower?

(0)
Intended forY9, this is a fully-resourced synoptic unit about international relations designed to support pupils as they move towards GCSE Geography. The unit examines international relations and the factors that affect these, superpowers, alliances, trade, hard- and soft-power, Belt and Road Initiative/debt-trap diplomacy, the causes, consequences and solutions of war and the role and efficacy of the UN. There is an optional final series of lessons to allow pupils to watch Hotel Rwanda to support their learning and provide a but of light relief at the very end of the year - the film is not provided and you should be sure to examine the accompanying PowerPoint that explains the premise to pupils and also states the exact time where the “N” word is used in the film so you can mute it. This lesson asks pupils to identify the criteria for being a ‘superpower’ then uses an engaging Top-Trumps style activity to ask them to rank countries based upon their eligibility. They they examine a model piece of extended writing before writing their own paragraph to argue which is the most important country in the world and why based upon this criteria.
7-8. Hotel Rwanda
tmm1979tmm1979

7-8. Hotel Rwanda

(0)
Intended forY9, this is a fully-resourced synoptic unit about international relations designed to support pupils as they move towards GCSE Geography. The unit examines international relations and the factors that affect these, superpowers, alliances, trade, hard- and soft-power, Belt and Road Initiative/debt-trap diplomacy, the causes, consequences and solutions of war and the role and efficacy of the UN. There is an optional final series of lessons to allow pupils to watch Hotel Rwanda to support their learning and provide a but of light relief at the very end of the year - the film is not provided and you should be sure to examine the accompanying PowerPoint that explains the premise to pupils and also states the exact time where the “N” word is used in the film so you can mute it. The PowerPoint introduces the complex background to the Rwandan genocide and provides guidance for teachers on leading learning through this film. This film is certified as a ‘12’. Do not show it to younger or more vulnerable children.