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A Science teacher by trade, I've also been known to be found teaching Maths and PE! However, strange as it may seem, my real love is designing resources that can be used by other teachers to maximise the experience of the students. I am constantly thinking of new ways to engage a student with a topic and try to implement that in the design of the lessons.

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A Science teacher by trade, I've also been known to be found teaching Maths and PE! However, strange as it may seem, my real love is designing resources that can be used by other teachers to maximise the experience of the students. I am constantly thinking of new ways to engage a student with a topic and try to implement that in the design of the lessons.
OCR A-Level Biology A REVISION LESSONS
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OCR A-Level Biology A REVISION LESSONS

20 Resources
Each of the 20 revision lessons included in this bundle has been designed to motivate and engage the students whilst they are challenged on their knowledge of the content of the OCR A-Level Biology A specification. The detailed PowerPoints contain a wide range of activities which include exam questions with explained answers, differentiated tasks and quiz competitions that are supported by the accompanying worksheets. The modules covered in this bundle are: Module 2.1.1: Cell structure Module 2.1.2: Biological molecules Module 2.1.3: Nucleotides and nucleic acids Module 2.1.4: Enzymes Module 2.1.5: Biological membranes Module 2.1.6: Cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation Module 3.1.2: Transport in animals Module 3.1.3: Transport in plants Module 4.1.1: Communicable diseases, disease prevention and the immune system Module 4.2.1: Biodiversity Module 4.2.2: Classification and evolution Module 5.1.2: Excretion as an example of homeostatic control Module 5.1.3: Neuronal communication Module 5.1.4: Hormonal communication Module 5.1.5: Plant and Animal responses Module 5.2.1: Photosynthesis Module 5.2.2: Respiration Module 6.1.1: Cellular control Module 6.1.2: Pattens of inheritance Module 6.1.3: Manipulating genomes Helpful hints are provided throughout the lessons to help the students with exam technique and in structuring their answers. These lessons are suitable for use throughout the course and can be used for revision purposes at the end of a module or in the lead up to mocks or the actual A LEVEL exams
Blood circulation in a mammal (AQA A-level Biology)
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Blood circulation in a mammal (AQA A-level Biology)

(3)
This fully-resourced lesson looks at the blood circulation in a mammal and considers how the pulmonary circulation differs from the systemic circulation. The engaging PowerPoint and accompanying resources have been designed to cover the third part of point 3.4.1 of the AQA A-level Biology specification The lesson begins with a focus on the double circulatory system and checks that students are clear in the understanding that the blood passes through the heart twice per cycle of the body. Beginning with the pulmonary circulation, students will recall that the pulmonary artery carries the blood from the right ventricle to the lungs. An opportunity is taken at this point to check on their knowledge of inhalation and the respiratory system as well as the gas exchange between the alveoli and the capillary bed. A quick quiz is used to introduce arterioles and students will learn that these blood vessels play a crucial role in the changes in blood pressure that prevent the capillaries from damage. When looking at the systemic circulation, time is taken to look at the coronary arteries and renal artery as students have to be aware of these vessels in addition to the ones associated with the heart. In the final part of the lesson, students are challenged to explain how the structure of the heart generates a higher pressure in the systemic circulation and then to explain why the differing pressures are necessary. This lesson has been written to tie in with the other uploaded lessons from topic 3.4.1 (mass transport in animals)
Writing half equations for electrolysis
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Writing half equations for electrolysis

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A fully-resourced lesson which includes a lesson presentation (24 slides) and a worksheet which is differentiated so that students can judge their understanding of the topic of writing half equations for electrolysis and access the work accordingly. The lesson uses worked examples and helpful hints to show the students how to write half equations at both the cathode and anode. Time is taken to remind students about the rules at the electrodes when the electrolyte is in solution so that they can work out the products before writing the equations. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 years old in the UK) but could be used with older students.
Topic 8: The control of gene expression (AQA A-level Biology)
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Topic 8: The control of gene expression (AQA A-level Biology)

7 Resources
Each of the 7 lessons which are included in this bundle have been written to specifically cover the content as detailed in topic 8 of the AQA A-level Biology specification (The control of gene expression). The wide range of activities will maintain engagement whilst supporting the explanations of the biological knowledge to allow the students to build a deep understanding of this potentially difficult topic! Lessons which cover the following specification points are included in this bundle: Gene mutations and their effect on the structure of proteins Regulation of transcription by transcription factors The role of oestrogen in initiating transcription Determining the genome of simpler organisms to determine the proteome and its applications The development of DNA sequencing methods The production of DNA fragments through use of enzymes or a gene machine The role of the PCR to amplify DNA fragments The transfer of DNA into a host cell VNTRs The technique of genetic fingerprinting to analyse DNA fragments If you would like to see the quality of the lessons, download the producing DNA fragments lesson as this has been uploaded for free
AQA GCSE Science B7 REVISION (Ecology)
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AQA GCSE Science B7 REVISION (Ecology)

(1)
An engaging lesson presentation (63 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within the Biology unit B7 (Ecology) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification unit B4.7). The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Communities Abiotic factors Biotic factors Levels of organisation Recycling materials Deforestation Global warming Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “Number CRAZY" whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
AQA GCSE Combined Science P1 (Energy) REVISION
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AQA GCSE Combined Science P1 (Energy) REVISION

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An engaging lesson presentation (41 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit P1 (Energy) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification unit P6.1). The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Energy stores and systems Changes in energy Efficiency Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “ERRORS with the equation calculations” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
Specific immune response (OCR A-level Biology)
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Specific immune response (OCR A-level Biology)

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This fully-resourced lesson describes the structure, different roles and modes of action of the B and T lymphocytes in the specific immune response. The detailed PowerPoint and accompanying resources have been designed to cover point 4.1.1 (f) as detailed in the OCR A-level Biology A specification and the structure of antibodies and the roles of memory cells is also briefly introduced so that students are prepared for an upcoming lesson on the secondary immune response (4.1.1 g) Antigen presentation was introduced at the end of the previous lesson so the task at the start of this lesson challenges students to recognise the name of this process and then they have to spot the errors in the passage that describes the details of this event. This reminds them that contact between the APC and T lymphocytes is necessary to elicit a response which they will come to recognise as the cellular response. A series of quick quiz rounds reveals key terms in a memorable way and one that is introduced is helper T cells. Time is then taken to describe the importance of cell signalling for an effective response and students will learn how the release of chemicals by these cells activates other aspects of the response. The role of the killer T cells and their production of cytotoxins is also described before an exam-style question is used to check on their understanding at this point of the lesson. This leads into the section of the lesson that deals with the humoral response and students will understand how this involves the antibodies that are produced by the plasma cells that are the result of clonal selection and expansion. The T and B memory cells are also introduced so that students can understand how they are retained in the body even after the pathogen has been overcome and will play a critical role in the development of immunity. The remainder of the lesson focuses on the role of the antibodies and the attachment of phagocytes to opsonins
AQA AS Biology REVISION LESSONS
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AQA AS Biology REVISION LESSONS

4 Resources
This bundle of 4 revision lessons covers the content in topics 1 - 4 of the AQA A-level Biology specification that are taught during year 12 (AS) of the two-year course. Each of the lessons has been designed to include a range of exam questions, differentiated tasks and quiz competitions that will motivate the students whilst they evaluate their understanding of the different sub-topics. Helpful hints are given throughout the lesson to aid the students in structuring their answers and the mathematical elements of the course are constantly challenged as well. The 4 topics covered by this bundle are: Topic 1:Biological molecules Topic 2: Cells Topic 3: Organisms exchange substances with their environment Topic 4: Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms
AQA A-level Biology REVISION LESSONS
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AQA A-level Biology REVISION LESSONS

8 Resources
This bundle of 8 revision lessons covers all of the topics on the AQA A-level Biology specification: Topic 1: Biological molecules Topic 2: Cells Topic 3: Organisms exchange substances with their environment Topic 4: Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms Topic 5: Energy transfers in and between organisms Topic 6: Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments Topic 7: Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems Topic 8: The control of gene expression These lessons use a range of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to motivate and engage the students whilst they assess their understanding of the different topics and evaluate which areas of the specification will require their further attention. These lessons can be used for revision at the end of the topic, in the lead up to mocks or in the lead up to the actual exams.
OCR A-level Biology A Module 5.2.2 REVISION (Respiration)
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OCR A-level Biology A Module 5.2.2 REVISION (Respiration)

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This fully-resourced REVISION LESSON has been designed to provide the students with numerous opportunities to assess their understanding of the content of module 5.2.2 (Respiration) of the OCR A-level Biology A specification. The importance of this metabolic reaction is obvious and this is reflected in the volume of questions in the terminal exams which require an in depth knowledge of the stages of both aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The lesson contains a wide range of activities that cover the following points of the specification: Glycolysis as a stage of aerobic and anaerobic respiration The use and production of ATP through respiration Anaerobic respiration in mammalian muscle tissue The stages of aerobic respiration that occur in the mitochondrial matrix Oxidative phosphorylation The use of respirometers Calculating the respiratory quotient value for different respiratory substrates Revision lessons which cover the other sub-modules of module 5 are uploaded and tie in well with this content
OCR A-level Biology Module 5.1.5 REVISION (Plant and Animal responses)
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OCR A-level Biology Module 5.1.5 REVISION (Plant and Animal responses)

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A fully resourced revision lesson which uses a range of exam questions (with explained answers), quick tasks and quiz competitions to enable the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within module 5.1.5 (Plant and animal responses) of the OCR A-level Biology A specification. The topics tested within this lesson include: Investigating tropisms The mammalian nervous system The brain Reflex actions Controlling heart rate Muscle Muscle contraction Student will enjoy the range of tasks and quiz rounds whilst crucially being able to recognise any areas which require further attention
Evidence for Evolution
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Evidence for Evolution

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A detailed lesson presentation (37 slides) and associated worksheets that looks at the different pieces of evidence that scientists use to support evolution and discusses how these support the theory. The lesson begins by challenging students to decide which piece of evidence is the key piece in supporting evolution (fossils). Students will then have to arrange a number of statements to describe how a fossil is formed. Students are introduced to the fossil record and questions are used to check that they understand where the oldest fossils would be found. Moving forwards, students are given three pieces of evidence that would be observed in the fossil record and they are challenged to explain how each of these supports the theory of evolution. Quick competitions are then used to get the students to see some extinct organisms in the Dodo and Woolly Mammoth and again they are questioned on how extinct animals support the theory of evolution. Further evidence in rapid changes in species and molecular comparison is discussed. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding and there is a set homework included.
AQA GCSE Combined Science B1 REVISION (Cell biology)
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AQA GCSE Combined Science B1 REVISION (Cell biology)

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An engaging lesson presentation (64 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit B1 (Cell Biology) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification point 4.1). The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Eukaryotes and prokaryotes Animal and plant cells Microscopy Chromosomes The cell cycle including mitosis Stem cells Diffusion Osmosis Active transport Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “SPOT the CELL” and “Take the Hotseat” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
AQA GCSE Combined Science REVISION LESSONS
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AQA GCSE Combined Science REVISION LESSONS

20 Resources
This bundle of 20 fully-resourced lessons have been designed to allow students who are studying the AQA GCSE Combined Science course to assess their understanding of the topics found within the following units of the specification: B1: Cell Biology B2: Organisation B4: Bioenergetics B5: Homeostasis and response B6: Inheritance, variation and evolution B7: Ecology C1: Atomic structure and the periodic table C2: Bonding, structure and properties of matter C3: Quantitative chemistry C4: Chemical changes C5: Energy changes C6: The rate and extent of chemical change C7: Organic chemistry C8: Chemical analysis C9: Chemistry of the atmosphere P1: Energy P2: Electricity P4: Atomic structure P5: Forces P6: Waves These lessons use a range of exam questions, understanding checks, quick tasks and quiz competitions to engage and motivate the students
Maths in AQA A-level Biology REVISION
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Maths in AQA A-level Biology REVISION

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The AQA specification states that a minimum of 10% of the marks across the 3 assessment papers will require the use of mathematical skills. This revision lesson has been designed to include a wide range of activities that challenge the students on these exact skills because success in the maths in biology questions can prove the difference between one grade and the next! Step-by-step guides are used to walk students through the application of a number of the formulae and then exam-style questions with clear mark schemes (which are included in the PowerPoint) will allow them to assess their progress. Other activities include differentiated tasks, group discussions and quick quiz competitions such as “FROM NUMBERS 2 LETTERS” and “YOU DO THE MATH”. The lesson has been written to cover as much of the mathematical requirements section of the specification as possible but the following have been given particular attention: Hardy-Weinberg equation Chi-squared test Calculating size Converting between quantitative units Standard deviation Estimating populations of sessile and motile species Percentages and percentage change Cardiac output Geometry Due to the detail and extensiveness of this lesson, it is estimated that it will take in excess of 2/3 hours of A-level teaching time to work through the activities and it can be used throughout the duration of the course
Xylem and Phloem (GCSE)
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Xylem and Phloem (GCSE)

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This is a fully-resourced lesson that looks at the functional and structural differences between the transport tissues in a plant, the xylem and phloem. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (41 slides), which includes numerous student-led tasks, progress checks and quick competitions and two question worksheets, one of which is a differentiated version to enable those students who are finding this topic difficult to still be able to access the learning. The lesson begins with the introduction of the two tissues as well as a brief introduction to the substances which they each carry. The next part of the lesson focuses on the xylem cells and the resulting xylem vessel, and key terms such as lignin are brought into the lesson so that students can understand how these cells are waterproofed, which causes them to decay and form hollow tubes. Having met a lot of information, students are challenged to act like an examiner to form a table based question to compare the xylem against the phloem where they have to come up with features which could be compared against. This table will form the backbone of the lesson and students will use it later in the lesson when they have to write summary passages about each of the tissues. Moving forwards, a quick competition is used to enable the students to meet the names of the cells that form the phloem tissue, the sieve tube elements and the companion cells. Students will see how they are involved in the functioning of the phloem and questions are posed which relate to other topics such as the involvement of mitochondria wherever active transport occurs. Progress checks like this are found at regular intervals throughout the lesson so that students can constantly assess their understanding. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students. If you are looking to teach about these tissues but to a higher standard, you could use my uploaded alternative called Xylem and Phloem (A-level)
Genetic fingerprinting (AQA A-level Biology)
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Genetic fingerprinting (AQA A-level Biology)

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This fully-resourced lesson explains how genetic fingerprinting can be used to analyse DNA fragments and explores its applications in forensic science and medical diagnosis. The engaging and detailed PowerPoint and accompanying resource have been written to cover all of point 8.4.3 of the AQA A-level Biology specification Each step of the genetic fingerprinting process is covered and time is taken to ensure that key details are understood. Students will be introduced to VNTRs and will come to recognise their usefulness in human identification as a result of the variability between individuals. Moving forwards, the involvement of the PCR and restriction enzymes are discussed and students are challenged on their knowledge of this process and these substances as they were encountered in a previous sub-topic. The main section of the lesson focuses on the use of gel electrophoresis to separate DNA fragments (as well as proteins) and the key ideas of separation due to differences in base pair length or molecular mass are discussed and explained. As well as current understanding checks, an application question involving Huntington’s disease is used to challenge their ability to apply their knowledge of the process to an unfamiliar situation. The remainder of the lesson describes how the DNA is transferred to a membrane and hybridisation probes are used to create a pattern on the X-ray film. Time has been taken to make continuous links to the previous lessons in topic 8 as well as those from topic 4 where DNA, RNA and protein synthesis were introduced.
The Collision Theory
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The Collision Theory

(8)
A concise lesson presentation (20 slides) that looks at how the collision theory is related to the rate of reaction. This is a short lesson that would be taught at the beginning of the topic that looks at the rate of reaction and the factors that affect the rate. Students are challenged with a quick competition that gets them to recognise keywords which are involved in the collision theory. Some time is then taken to focus on "activation energy" and how this is shown on a reaction profile. Finally, students will use their keywords to form a clear definition for the collision theory which includes its link to the rate of reaction so this can be used in the upcoming lessons This lesson has ultimately been designed for GCSE students but can be used with all age groups as an introduction to the topic
Specific heat capacity
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Specific heat capacity

(13)
A detailed lesson presentation (25 slides) that introduces students to the difficult topic of specific heat capacity. Students are guided through the equation for energy transferred and shown how to rearrange the equation, so they are able to tackle the question, no matter the subject of the question. There are regular opportunities for students to apply their new found knowledge to questions and to assess themselves against the answers. Quick games and competitions are also used to maintain engagement. If you choose to download this lesson, it would be much appreciated if you would take just a few seconds to write a review so I can improve my practice and other teachers can see if this resource is right for them. Thank you in advance.
ATP & energy transfer (OCR A-level PE)
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ATP & energy transfer (OCR A-level PE)

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This detailed lesson introduces ATP as the body’s energy store and energy currency and explains how PC, glycogen and fat are sources for its re-synthesis during exercise. The engaging PowerPoint has been designed to cover the ATP and energy transfer section of topic 1.1.c as detailed in the OCR A-level PE specification. The lesson begins by challenging the students to recognise that the link between muscle contraction, active transport and the conduction of electrical impulses is the need for energy. A number of quick quiz competitions are used throughout the lesson to maintain engagement and to introduce key terms and values and the first quiz round will result in the students meeting adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP). Time is taken to describe the structure of this energy store and to explain how it will be broken down into ADP and a phosphate and that this mechanism results in the release of energy for muscle contraction. Importantly, students will learn that the ATP stored in muscles will only allow for the first few seconds of contraction and therefore if exercise and contraction are to continue, the ATP will need to be re-synthesised. The main part of the lesson explores how phosphocreatine, glycogen and fats are sources for this re-synthesis. Key details about each of these sources are provided and explained and links are made to upcoming lessons on the energy systems as well as to topics already covered such as the different types of muscle fibres. The final round of the quiz, which is called “What’s your SOURCE?” acts a final understanding check as the teams of students have to recognise one of the 4 energy sources based on a description. This lesson has been specifically written to tie in with the next lessons on the ATP-PC, glycolytic and aerobic energy systems.