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A Science teacher by trade, I've also been known to be found teaching Maths and PE! However, strange as it may seem, my real love is designing resources that can be used by other teachers to maximise the experience of the students. I am constantly thinking of new ways to engage a student with a topic and try to implement that in the design of the lessons.

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A Science teacher by trade, I've also been known to be found teaching Maths and PE! However, strange as it may seem, my real love is designing resources that can be used by other teachers to maximise the experience of the students. I am constantly thinking of new ways to engage a student with a topic and try to implement that in the design of the lessons.
Metals and non-metals
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Metals and non-metals

(3)
A fun, engaging and detailed lesson presentation (29 slides) on the properties of metals and non-metals. This lesson focuses on the key properties and their key terms such as malleable and ductile. A number of quick competitions are used to introduce these terms to the students and once provided with the definitions, the students are expected to put these properties correctly with the metals (or non-metals). Progress checks occur throughout the lesson so that the understanding of the students can be checked. This lesson is designed for both KS3 and GCSE students.
Sex determination
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Sex determination

(2)
A fully-resourced lesson which looks at how the sex chromosomes which determine gender are inherited in humans. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (24 slides) and an associated worksheet containing knowledge recall and application questions. The lesson begins with a range of different quiz competitions which enable the students to get the answers of X, Y, zygote and 23. With a little bit of assistance, students are challenged to bring these terms together to complete a passage about how the inheritance of either an XX genotype will lead to a female or a XY genotype will lead to a male. Moving forwards, students are told how they will be expected to be able to construct a genetic diagram to show the inheritance of gender and so are given a quick recap before being challenged to do just that. The last part of the lesson gets students to discuss and consider whether females or males are responsible for determining sex in terms of their gametes. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson to allow the students to check on their understanding. The lesson has been written for GCSE students primarily but the content is suitable for both KS3 and even A-level students
Chi-squared test (AQA A-level Biology)
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Chi-squared test (AQA A-level Biology)

(0)
This lesson guides students through the use of the chi-squared test to determine the significance of the difference between observed and expected results. It is fully-resourced with a detailed PowerPoint and differentiated task worksheets that have been designed to cover the part of point 7.1 of the AQA A-level Biology specification which states that students should be able to use the test to compare the goodness of fit between the observed phenotypic ratios and expected ratios. The lesson has been written to include a step-by-step guide that demonstrates how to carry out the test in small sections. At each step, time is taken to explain any parts which could cause confusion and helpful hints are provided to increase the likelihood of success in exam questions on this topic. Students will understand how to use the phenotypic ratio to calculate the expected numbers and then how to find the critical value in order to compare it against the chi-squared value. A worked example is used to show the working which will be required to access the marks and then the main task challenges the students to apply their knowledge to a series of questions of increasing difficulty. This is the final lesson of topic 7.1 (inheritance) and links are made throughout the lesson to earlier parts of this topic such as dihybrid inheritance as well as to earlier topics such as meiosis.
AQA A-level Biology Topic 6: Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments
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AQA A-level Biology Topic 6: Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments

15 Resources
This bundle contains 15 fully-resourced and detailed lessons that have been designed to cover the content of topic 6 of the AQA A-level Biology specification which concerns the responses of organisms to stimuli. The wide range of activities included in each lesson will engage the students whilst the detailed content is covered and the understanding and previous knowledge checks allow them to assess their progress on the current topic as well as challenging them to make links to other related topics. Most of the tasks are differentiated to allow differing abilities to access the work and be challenged. The following sub-topics are covered in this bundle of lessons: The role of sensory receptors as outlined by the Pacinian corpuscle The roles of the SAN, AVN, Bundle of His and Purkyne fibres in the conduction system of the heart The control of heart rate The structure of a myelinated motor neurone The factors that affect the speed of conduction of an impulse The generation and transmission of nerve impulses The transmission at a cholinergic synapse and a neuromuscular junction Summation The contraction of skeletal muscles The principles of homeostasis including negative feedback systems The control of blood glucose concentration by the controlled release of insulin and glucagon The causes and control of diabetes type I and II The gross structure of the kidney The detailed structure of the nephron The production of glomerular filtrate The reabsorption of glucose and water in the PCT The role of the hypothalamus, posterior pituitary and ADH in osmoregulation This is one of the 8 topics which have to be covered over the length of the 2 year course and therefore it is expected that the teaching time for this bundle will be in excess of 2 months If you want to see the quality of the lessons before purchasing then the lessons on saltatory conduction, the contraction of skeletal muscles and ultrafiltration are free resources to download
Types of selection (AQA A-level Biology)
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Types of selection (AQA A-level Biology)

(1)
This engaging and fully-resourced lesson looks at the effects of stabilising, directional and disruptive selection as the three main types of selection. The PowerPoint and accompanying resources have been designed to cover the 3rd part of point 7.3 of the AQA A-level Biology specification which states that students should be able to identify each type of selection by its effect on different phenotypes. The lesson begins with an introduction to the mark, release, recapture method to calculate numbers of rabbits with different coloured fur in a particular habitat. This method is covered later in topic 7 so this section of the lesson is designed purely to generate changes in numbers of the organisms. Sketch graphs are then constructed to show the changes in the population size in this example. A quick quiz competition is used to engage the students whilst introducing the names of the three main types of selection before a class discussion point encourages the students to recognise which specific type of selection is represented by the rabbits. Key terminology including intermediate and extreme phenotypes and selection pressure are used to emphasise their importance during explanations. A change in the environment of the habitat and a change in the numbers of the rabbits introduces directional selection before students will be given time to discuss and to predict the shape of the sketch graph for disruptive selection. Students are challenged to apply their knowledge in the final task of the lesson by choosing the correct type of selection when presented with details of a population and answer related questions.
Cardiac cycle (AQA A-level Biology)
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Cardiac cycle (AQA A-level Biology)

(0)
This detailed lesson describes and explains the pressure and volume changes and associated valve movements that occur during the cardiac cycle to maintain the unidirectional flow of blood. The PowerPoint and accompanying resource have been designed to cover the 5th part of point 3.4.1 of the AQA A-level Biology specification. The start of the lesson introduces the cardiac cycle as well as the key term systole, so that students can immediately recognise that the three stages of the cycle are atrial and ventricular systole followed by diastole. Students are challenged on their prior knowledge of the structure of the heart as they have to name and state the function of an atrioventricular and semi-lunar valve from an internal diagram. This leads into the key point that pressure changes in the chambers and the major arteries results in the opening and closing of these sets of valves. Students are given a description of the pressure change that results in the opening of the AV valves and shown where this would be found on the graph detailing the pressure changes of the cardiac cycle. They then have to use this as a guide to write descriptions for the closing of the AV valve and the opening and closing of the semi-lunar valves and to locate these on the graph. By providing the students with this graph, the rest of the lesson can focus on explaining how these changes come about. Students have to use their current and prior knowledge of the chambers and blood vessels to write 4 descriptions that cover the cardiac cycle. The final part of the lesson covers the changes in the volume of the ventricle. This lesson has been written to tie in with the other uploaded lessons on the circulatory system as detailed in topic 3.4.1 (Mass transport in animals)
Neutralisation reactions
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Neutralisation reactions

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A lesson presentation (44 slides), accompanied by a question worksheet, which together looks at the reactants and products of a neutralisation reaction and challenges students to represent these reactions with equations. The lesson begins with a bit of fun as students are asked to read through a scene from the US comedy show and spot that a neutralisation reaction is hidden under the jokes. Students will use their KS3 knowledge to recall that these reactions involve acids and alkalis and moving forwards they will be introduced to a new term, base. The rest of the lesson focuses on writing word and balanced symbol equations for different neutralisation reactions. A step by step guide is used to demonstrate how to work out the name of the salt as well as writing accurate chemical formulae. Finally, students are challenged to apply their new-found knowledge and complete equations for 4 neutralisation reactions and they can assess against the displayed mark schemes. Progress checks have been written into the lesson at regular intervals so that this self-assessment is constant and any misconceptions are quickly addressed. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with younger students who are looking to extend their knowledge
AQA A-level Biology REVISION LESSONS
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AQA A-level Biology REVISION LESSONS

8 Resources
This bundle of 8 revision lessons covers all of the topics on the AQA A-level Biology specification: Topic 1: Biological molecules Topic 2: Cells Topic 3: Organisms exchange substances with their environment Topic 4: Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms Topic 5: Energy transfers in and between organisms Topic 6: Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments Topic 7: Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems Topic 8: The control of gene expression These lessons use a range of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to motivate and engage the students whilst they assess their understanding of the different topics and evaluate which areas of the specification will require their further attention. These lessons can be used for revision at the end of the topic, in the lead up to mocks or in the lead up to the actual exams.
OCR A-level Biology A PAPER 1 REVISION (Biological processes)
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OCR A-level Biology A PAPER 1 REVISION (Biological processes)

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This resource has been designed to motivate students whilst they evaluate their understanding of the content in modules 1, 2, 3 and 5 of the OCR A-level Biology A specification which can be assessed in PAPER 1 (Biological processes). The resource includes a detailed and engaging Powerpoint (149 slides) and is fully-resourced with differentiated worksheets that challenge the students on a wide range of topics. The resource has been written to include different types of activities such as exam questions with explained answers, understanding checks and quiz competitions. The aim was to cover as much of the specification content as possible but the following topics have been given particular attention: Monosaccharides, disaccharides and polysaccharides Glycogen and starch as stores and providers of energy The homeostatic control of blood glucose concentration Osmoregulation Lipids Ultrafiltration and selective reabsorption Diabetes mellitus Voluntary and involuntary muscle The autonomic control of heart rate The organisation of the nervous system The gross structure of the human heart Haemoglobin and the Bohr shift Bonding The ultrastructure of plant cells Cyclic vs non-cyclic photophosphorylation Oxidative phosphorylation Anaerobic respiration in eukaryotes Helpful hints and tips are given throughout the resource to help students to structure their answers. This resource can be used in the lead up to the actual Paper 1 exam or earlier in the course when a particular area of modules 1, 2, 3 or 5 is being studied. If you are happy with this resource, why not look at the one which has been designed for Paper 2 (Biological diversity)?
Sex-linkage (AQA A-level Biology)
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Sex-linkage (AQA A-level Biology)

(1)
This fully-resourced lesson explores the inheritance of sex-linked diseases in humans and then challenges the students to apply their knowledge to examples in other animals. The detailed PowerPoint and associated differentiated resources have been designed to cover the part of point 7.1 of the AQA A-level specification which states that students should be able to use fully-labelled genetic diagrams to predict the results of crosses involving sex-linkage. Key genetic terminology is used throughout and the lesson begins with a check on their ability to identify the definition of homologous chromosomes. Students will recall that the sex chromosomes are not fully homologous and that the smaller Y chromosome lacks some of the genes that are found on the X. This leads into one of the numerous discussion points, where students are encouraged to consider whether females or males are more likely to suffer from sex-linked diseases. In terms of humans, the lesson focuses on haemophilia and red-green colour blindness and a step-by-step guide is used to demonstrate how these specific genetic diagrams should be constructed and how the phenotypes should then be interpreted. The final tasks of the lesson challenge the students to carry out a dihybrid cross that involves a sex-linked disease and an autosomal disease before applying their knowledge to a question about chickens and how the rate of feather production in chicks can be used to determine gender. All of the tasks are differentiated so that students of differing abilities can access the work and all exam questions have fully-explained, visual markschemes to allow them to assess their progress and address any misconceptions
Pearson Edexcel IGCSE Physics REVISION LESSONS
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Pearson Edexcel IGCSE Physics REVISION LESSONS

9 Resources
This bundle of 9 revision lessons uses a range of exam questions (with explained answers), differentiated tasks and quiz competitions to engage the students whilst challenging their knowledge of the content in the Pearson Edexcel IGCSE Physics specification: All 8 topics are covered by the lessons in this bundle: Topic 1: Forces and motion Topic 2: Electricity Topic 3: Waves Topic 4: Energy resources and energy transfers Topic 5: Solids, liquids and gases Topic 6: Magnetism and electromagnetism Topic 7: Radioactivity and particles Topic 8: Astrophysics There is also an additional lesson which challenges the students on their knowledge of the 21 Physics equations If you want to see the quality of the lessons, download the topic 1 and 7 and equations revision lessons as these are free
AQA A-level Biology Topic 4.3 (Genetic diversity can arise as a result of mutation or meiosis)
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AQA A-level Biology Topic 4.3 (Genetic diversity can arise as a result of mutation or meiosis)

4 Resources
Each of the 4 lessons in this bundle are fully-resourced and have been designed to cover the content as detailed in topic 4.3 (Genetic diversity can arise as a result of mutation or meiosis) of the AQA A-Level Biology specification. The specification points that are covered within these lessons include: Base deletions and base substitutions as examples of gene mutations The degenerate nature of the genetic code Mutagenic agents increase the rate of mutation Chromosome mutations arise spontaneously during meiosis Meiosis produces genetically different daughter cells Crossing over and independent segregation as events that contribute to genetic variation The lessons have been written to include a wide range of activities and numerous understanding and prior knowledge checks so students can assess their progress against the current topic as well as be challenged to make links to other topics within this topic and earlier topics If you would like to see the quality of the lessons, download the gene mutations lesson which is free
Monoclonal antibodies
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Monoclonal antibodies

(2)
An engaging lesson presentation (32 slides) and differentiated worksheets that look at the meaning of the substances termed monoclonal antibodies, explains how they are produced and explores their different applications. The lesson begins by breaking the term down into three parts so that students can understand that these substances are proteins that attach to antigens and come from a single clone of cells. Students will meet key terms such as lymphocytes, myelomas and hybridomas and will be able to link them to understand how these antibodies are produced. Moving forwards, time is taken to focus on the application of monoclonal antibodies in pregnancy tests. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding and a set homework is included as part of the lesson. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but can be used with lower ability A-level students who are studying this topic
Empirical formula
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Empirical formula

(0)
A fully-resourced lesson which guides students through the method involved in calculating the empirical formula and includes a concise, clear lesson presentation (21 slides) and practice questions. Students are given a template to use as they are introduced to the questions and then encouraged to work without it as the lesson progresses. The students are shown how empirical formula questions can be made more difficult and hints are given so that students are able to tackle them and access all of the marks available. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK)
Sampling techniques
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Sampling techniques

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A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the different sampling methods that can be used to estimate the populations of animals and plants in a habitat and to analyse how their distribution is affected, The lesson includes a detailed and engaging lesson presentation (56 slides) and differentiated worksheets so that students of different abilities are challenged and can access the work. The lesson begins by looking at the use of a quadrat to estimate the population of plants in a habitat. There is a focus on the mathematical calculations associated with the method and students are given hints and worked examples so that any common misconceptions are addressed. Moving forwards, students are introduced to the capture-mark-recapture technique to sample animals. The rest of the lesson looks at alternative pieces of apparatus, such as the sweep net, and discusses situations when these would be used. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is appropriate for both younger students who are learning about ecology and also for A-level students who need a recap on this topic.
Writing half equations for electrolysis
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Writing half equations for electrolysis

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A fully-resourced lesson which includes a lesson presentation (24 slides) and a worksheet which is differentiated so that students can judge their understanding of the topic of writing half equations for electrolysis and access the work accordingly. The lesson uses worked examples and helpful hints to show the students how to write half equations at both the cathode and anode. Time is taken to remind students about the rules at the electrodes when the electrolyte is in solution so that they can work out the products before writing the equations. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 years old in the UK) but could be used with older students.
Autosomal Linkage (OCR A-level Biology)
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Autosomal Linkage (OCR A-level Biology)

(3)
This clear and concise lesson explains how the inheritance of two or more genes that have loci on the same autosome demonstrates autosomal linkage. The engaging PowerPoint and associated resource have been designed to cover the part of point 6.1.2 (b[ii]) of the OCR A-level Biology A specification which states that students should be able to demonstrate and apply their knowledge and understanding of the use of phenotypic ratios to identify autosomal linkage. This is a topic which can cause confusion for students so time was taken in the design to split the concept into small chunks. There is a clear focus on how the number of original phenotypes and recombinants can be used to determine linkage and suggest how the loci of the two genes compare. Important links to other topics such as crossing over in meiosis are made to enable students to understand how the random formation of the chiasma determines whether new phenotypes will be seen in the offspring or not. Linkage is an important cause of variation and the difference between observed and expected results and this is emphasised on a number of occasions. The main task of the lesson acts as an understanding check where students are challenged to analyse a set of results involving the inheritance of the ABO blood group gene and the nail-patella syndrome gene to determine whether they have loci on the same chromosome and if so, how close their loci would appear to be. This lesson has been written to tie in with the other lessons from module 6.1.2 (Patterns of Inheritance)
The Collision Theory
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The Collision Theory

(6)
A concise lesson presentation (20 slides) that looks at how the collision theory is related to the rate of reaction. This is a short lesson that would be taught at the beginning of the topic that looks at the rate of reaction and the factors that affect the rate. Students are challenged with a quick competition that gets them to recognise keywords which are involved in the collision theory. Some time is then taken to focus on "activation energy" and how this is shown on a reaction profile. Finally, students will use their keywords to form a clear definition for the collision theory which includes its link to the rate of reaction so this can be used in the upcoming lessons This lesson has ultimately been designed for GCSE students but can be used with all age groups as an introduction to the topic
Chromatography
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Chromatography

(10)
A detailed, engaging and informative lesson presentation (50 slides) and accompanying worksheets that looks at the commonly misunderstood topic of chromatography. This lesson goes through paper, thin-layer and gas chromatography so that students can analyse and interpret the results that would be found on a chromatogram. The lesson begins by challenging the students to recall details of this separation method when they met it at KS3. Students will meet the two chemical phases, mobile and stationary, and begin to understand that this method relies on the distribution of substances between these two phases. Students will meet the calculation for retention factor and be shown how to tackle questions on this topic before trying themselves. Time is taken to go over the details of gas chromatography, in a step by step guide format, as this is a poorly understood topic. There are progress checks throughout the lesson, which include mark schemes and detailed explanations, so that students can assess their understanding and address any misconceptions that could arise. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with A-level students
Group 7:  The halogens
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Group 7: The halogens

(2)
This is a fully-resourced lesson about group 7 of the Periodic Table, the halogens, which includes a lesson presentation (34 slides) and a differentiated worksheet. The lesson begins by challenging students to recognise and explain why the electronic structure of group 1 and group 7 means that they react together easily. As the lesson progresses, students will learn more and more properties about the halogens and key terms such as diatomic are used throughout so that students become accustomed to these. Moving forwards, students will carry out a series of displacement reactions so that they can recognise that the reactivity of these elements decreases as they go down the group. Students are challeged to explain this with reference to electron configuration and a differentiated worksheet will help those who need assistance to access this work. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is suitable for younger students who might be carrying out a project on the Periodic Table