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I'm a Science teacher of 13 years who is passionate about designing and developing lessons to maximise progress in my classroom. I truly believe that making the Powerpoints as professional as possible can raise engagement and I pride myself on creating new tasks and ideas to motivate all. I hope you enjoy the lessons I've shared!

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I'm a Science teacher of 13 years who is passionate about designing and developing lessons to maximise progress in my classroom. I truly believe that making the Powerpoints as professional as possible can raise engagement and I pride myself on creating new tasks and ideas to motivate all. I hope you enjoy the lessons I've shared!
Competition and Interdependence

Competition and Interdependence

A detailed and engaging lesson presentation (52 slides) and accompanying worksheet that looks at competition between organisms and the different types of relationships that exist as a result of this interaction. The lesson begins by looking at the meaning of the biological term, "competition", and then introduces this when it occurs between the same species and different species. Students are challenged to consider the different resources that animals compete for before an activity based competition is used to get them to recognise how this competition can cause changes to the population size. Moving forwards, students will meet the three main types of ecological relationship and look at them in greater detail, with predation being a main focus. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson (with displayed answers) so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students but can be used with more-able KS3 students who are looking at ecosystems and the relationships that exist within them
GJHeducation
Evidence for Evolution

Evidence for Evolution

A detailed lesson presentation (37 slides) and associated worksheets that looks at the different pieces of evidence that scientists use to support evolution and discusses how these support the theory. The lesson begins by challenging students to decide which piece of evidence is the key piece in supporting evolution (fossils). Students will then have to arrange a number of statements to describe how a fossil is formed. Students are introduced to the fossil record and questions are used to check that they understand where the oldest fossils would be found. Moving forwards, students are given three pieces of evidence that would be observed in the fossil record and they are challenged to explain how each of these supports the theory of evolution. Quick competitions are then used to get the students to see some extinct organisms in the Dodo and Woolly Mammoth and again they are questioned on how extinct animals support the theory of evolution. Further evidence in rapid changes in species and molecular comparison is discussed. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding and there is a set homework included.
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Metals and non-metals

Metals and non-metals

A fun, engaging and detailed lesson presentation (29 slides) on the properties of metals and non-metals. This lesson focuses on the key properties and their key terms such as malleable and ductile. A number of quick competitions are used to introduce these terms to the students and once provided with the definitions, the students are expected to put these properties correctly with the metals (or non-metals). Progress checks occur throughout the lesson so that the understanding of the students can be checked. This lesson is designed for both KS3 and GCSE students.
GJHeducation
Autosomal Linkage

Autosomal Linkage

An informative lesson presentation (25 slides) that guides students through the topic of autosomal linkage, so that they can understand how phenotypic ratios can be used to make suggestions about genetic inheritance. The lesson begins by introducing students to the fact that more than one gene are found on each chromosome and therefore the likelihood of these genes being inherited together increases, which is known as linkage. Students will be given numerous results of genetic crosses and shown how to use the number of original phenotypes and the number of recombinants to make judgements about the loci of the genes on the chromosome and how much affect crossing over had on the results. There are regular progress checks so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been designed for A level Biology students
GJHeducation
OCR A-level Biology REVISION

OCR A-level Biology REVISION

This bundle of 6 lesson presentations covers a lot of the key material in Modules 2,3,4,5 & 6 of the OCR A-level Biology specification in a revision format. The combination of exam questions with explained answers, understanding checks, quick tasks and engaging quiz competitions enables students to assess their understanding of the different topics and prioritise their work going forward.
GJHeducation
Monoclonal antibodies

Monoclonal antibodies

An engaging lesson presentation (32 slides) and differentiated worksheets that look at the meaning of the substances termed monoclonal antibodies, explains how they are produced and explores their different applications. The lesson begins by breaking the term down into three parts so that students can understand that these substances are proteins that attach to antigens and come from a single clone of cells. Students will meet key terms such as lymphocytes, myelomas and hybridomas and will be able to link them to understand how these antibodies are produced. Moving forwards, time is taken to focus on the application of monoclonal antibodies in pregnancy tests. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding and a set homework is included as part of the lesson. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but can be used with lower ability A-level students who are studying this topic
GJHeducation
States of matter and changing state

States of matter and changing state

This is an informative and engaging lesson, which has been designed for GCSE but is perfectly suitable for younger students who are studying the states of matter. Students will have encountered this topic at KS3 and potentially before, and therefore the aim of this lesson is to consolidate that knowledge and to deepen in critical areas. A number of quick competitions have been written into the lesson to maintain engagement and to test prior knowledge in a different way. In addition, progress checks are found at regular intervals so that students can constantly assess their understanding. The start of the lesson looks at the different properties of the three states and ensures that particle diagrams are not only recognised but can be explained. A lot of students consider elements to be in one state only at all times and therefore time is taken to show them how the specific temperature is the determining factor on the state. Students are guided through using the melting and boiling points to determine which state a substance is in at a given temperature. The rest of the lesson focuses on changing state and the change in the particles at each of these stages.
GJHeducation
Elements

Elements

This is an engaging lesson which uses a range of tasks and quiz competitions to ensure that the important details about elements are embedded so that students can use them in related Chemistry topics. The lesson begins by looking at the chemical symbols that are used with the elements. Students do not have to know the symbols off by heart because of the widely available Periodic Table but a sound knowledge will always help going forward. Time is taken to ensure that students understand how the symbols have to be written so that those with two letters consist of a capital and a lower case letter. In a race against each other, students are challenged to complete a crossword by converting symbols to the name of elements. This will result in a winner, a second placed and a third placed student who can be given a gold, silver and bronze medal. The atoms within each of these medals is explored so that students can learn that the gold and silver medals will only be made up of one type of atom and are therefore elements whilst the bronze is an alloy. The remainder of the lesson looks at some of the uses of the different elements and a homework task gets students to put this into written form. This lesson is suitable for both KS3 and GCSE students.
GJHeducation
Codominance and multiple alleles

Codominance and multiple alleles

This is a fully-resourced lesson that looks at the inheritance of multiple alleles characteristics and alleles that are co-dominant. This lesson includes an informative and detailed lesson presentation (22 slides) and a differentiated question worksheet. The inheritance of the ABO human blood groups displays both co-dominance and multiple alleles and is therefore used to introduce and explain both of these characteristics. Students will be meet the three alleles that can be found at the locus on chromosome 9 and will be challenged to write down all of the possible genotypes. Moving forwards, having met the definition of co-dominance, students will recognise that the 6 different genotypes only produces 4 different phenotypes. Progress checks have been written into the lesson at regular intervals, which check on learning from the current lesson as well as related topics such as monogenic inheritance. Time is taken to go through the understanding and interpretation of genetic trees and students are challenged to identify phenotypes from a tree. This question is differentiated so that students of all abilities can access the learning. The final part of the lesson involves one final understanding check question where a characteristic displays co-dominance in a cat to test that students can apply their knowledge away from a human. This lesson has been written for A-level students but could be used with younger students who want to explore genetics to a deeper level than that experienced at GCSE,
GJHeducation
Rates of reaction

Rates of reaction

A fully-resourced lesson which looks at the meaning of the rate of reaction and guides students through calculating both the mean and instantaneous rate of reaction. The lesson includes a concise lesson presentation (19 slides) and a question worksheet which is differentiated two ways. The lesson begins by challenging the students to suggest the missing factor in the rate of reaction equation so they can learn that either the mass of a reactant or a mass of a product could be used. Links are made to practical skills as students will understand that if a product is in the gaseous form, the volume produced within a set time will enable the rate to be calculated. Worked examples are used to show the students how to calculate the mean rate of reaction and then the instantaneous using a tangent. The rest of the lesson involves collecting data from an experiment to calculate the rate of reaction. The questions associated with the practical have been differentiated so students who need assistance can still access the learning. This lesson has been written for GCSE students
GJHeducation
Diabetes Type I and II

Diabetes Type I and II

A detailed and engaging lesson presentation (43 slides) and accompanying worksheets that introduces students to the disease, Diabetes (mellitus), and focusses on the similarities and differences between types I and II. The lesson begins by challenging the students mathematically to get the answers 1 and 2 and then to see whether they can link these numbers to a disease. A variety of tasks, which includes competitions and progress checks, are used to get the students to recognise the differences and state which of the types they belong to. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students and can be used with higher level students. However, a lesson more appropriate for A-level Biology students is named “Diabetes Mellitus Type I and II” and is available in my resources
GJHeducation
AQA GCSE Biology Unit B1 (Cell Biology) REVISION

AQA GCSE Biology Unit B1 (Cell Biology) REVISION

An engaging lesson presentation (58 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit B1 of the AQA GCSE Biology specification. The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Eukaryotes and prokaryotes Animal and plant cells Microscopy Chromosomes Diffusion Osmosis Active transport Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like "A QUESTION of CELLS" and "Take the Hotseat" whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
GJHeducation
Sampling techniques

Sampling techniques

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the different sampling methods that can be used to estimate the populations of animals and plants in a habitat and to analyse how their distribution is affected, The lesson includes a detailed and engaging lesson presentation (56 slides) and differentiated worksheets so that students of different abilities are challenged and can access the work. The lesson begins by looking at the use of a quadrat to estimate the population of plants in a habitat. There is a focus on the mathematical calculations associated with the method and students are given hints and worked examples so that any common misconceptions are addressed. Moving forwards, students are introduced to the capture-mark-recapture technique to sample animals. The rest of the lesson looks at alternative pieces of apparatus, such as the sweep net, and discusses situations when these would be used. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is appropriate for both younger students who are learning about ecology and also for A-level students who need a recap on this topic.
GJHeducation
OCR A-level Biology Module 2.2 (Biological molecules) REVISION

OCR A-level Biology Module 2.2 (Biological molecules) REVISION

A highly engaging lesson presentation (58 slides) and accompanying worksheets that uses exam questions (with explained answers), quick tasks and competitions to allow students to assess their understanding of the topic of Biological molecules (Module 2.2). Students will have fun whilst recognising those areas of the specification which need further attention. Competitions include "Take the Hotseat", "You do the MATH" and "james BOND" so that literacy and numeracy skills are tested along with the content knowledge.
GJHeducation
AQA GCSE Science C7 REVISION (Organic chemistry)

AQA GCSE Science C7 REVISION (Organic chemistry)

An engaging lesson presentation (54 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within the Chemistry unit C7 (Organic chemistry) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification point C5.7) The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Crude oil, hydrocarbons and alkanes Fractional distillation and petrochemicals Properties of hydrocarbons Cracking and alkenes Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “What FRACTION of this is correct” and “Are you on FORM” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
GJHeducation
AQA GCSE Combined Science Unit P6 (Waves) REVISION

AQA GCSE Combined Science Unit P6 (Waves) REVISION

An engaging lesson presentation (45 slides) that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit P6 (Waves) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification point P6.6). The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Longitudinal and transverse waves Properties of waves Types of EM waves Properties and applications of EM waves Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “Tell EM the word” and “Take the HOTSEAT” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
GJHeducation
Image, actual and magnification questions

Image, actual and magnification questions

A series of 5 exam questions that challenge students to work out the actual size of a section as seen under a microscope or the magnification. These questions will test their ability to convert between measurements and give answers in micrometers. These questions are suitable for GCSE and A-level students
GJHeducation
Specific heat capacity

Specific heat capacity

A detailed lesson presentation (25 slides) that introduces students to the difficult topic of specific heat capacity. Students are guided through the equation for energy transferred and shown how to rearrange the equation, so they are able to tackle the question, no matter the subject of the question. There are regular opportunities for students to apply their new found knowledge to questions and to assess themselves against the answers. Quick games and competitions are also used to maintain engagement. If you choose to download this lesson, it would be much appreciated if you would take just a few seconds to write a review so I can improve my practice and other teachers can see if this resource is right for them. Thank you in advance.
GJHeducation
The Collision Theory

The Collision Theory

A concise lesson presentation (20 slides) that looks at how the collision theory is related to the rate of reaction. This is a short lesson that would be taught at the beginning of the topic that looks at the rate of reaction and the factors that affect the rate. Students are challenged with a quick competition that gets them to recognise keywords which are involved in the collision theory. Some time is then taken to focus on "activation energy" and how this is shown on a reaction profile. Finally, students will use their keywords to form a clear definition for the collision theory which includes its link to the rate of reaction so this can be used in the upcoming lessons This lesson has ultimately been designed for GCSE students but can be used with all age groups as an introduction to the topic
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Oxidative phosphorylation

Oxidative phosphorylation

An engaging and detailed lesson presentation (37 slides) that uses a step-by-step guide to go through the details of the final stage of aerobic respiration, oxidative phosphorylation. The lesson begins by challenging the students to work out what the starting substances of this stage will be, considering that the Kreb's cycle does not have an obvious end-product as was seen with the Link reaction and glycolysis. Students will learn that the reduced coenzymes, NAD and FAD, release their hydrogen atoms and this is the starting point. From then on, a guide is used to look at each fine detail of this stage. Key terms such as chemiosmosis are introduced and discussed and the yield of ATP explained with reference to the ATP synthase enzyme. There are a number of quick competitions in the lesson to maintain motivation and there are also regular progress checks so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson is designed for A-level students
GJHeducation