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I'm a Science teacher of 13 years who is passionate about designing and developing lessons to maximise progress in my classroom. I truly believe that making the Powerpoints as professional as possible can raise engagement and I pride myself on creating new tasks and ideas to motivate all. I hope you enjoy the lessons I've shared!

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I'm a Science teacher of 13 years who is passionate about designing and developing lessons to maximise progress in my classroom. I truly believe that making the Powerpoints as professional as possible can raise engagement and I pride myself on creating new tasks and ideas to motivate all. I hope you enjoy the lessons I've shared!
Monoclonal antibodies
GJHeducation

Monoclonal antibodies

(1)
An engaging lesson presentation (32 slides) and differentiated worksheets that look at the meaning of the substances termed monoclonal antibodies, explains how they are produced and explores their different applications. The lesson begins by breaking the term down into three parts so that students can understand that these substances are proteins that attach to antigens and come from a single clone of cells. Students will meet key terms such as lymphocytes, myelomas and hybridomas and will be able to link them to understand how these antibodies are produced. Moving forwards, time is taken to focus on the application of monoclonal antibodies in pregnancy tests. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding and a set homework is included as part of the lesson. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but can be used with lower ability A-level students who are studying this topic
OCR A-level Biology REVISION
GJHeducation

OCR A-level Biology REVISION

5 Resources
This bundle of 6 lesson presentations covers a lot of the key material in Modules 2,3,4,5 & 6 of the OCR A-level Biology specification in a revision format. The combination of exam questions with explained answers, understanding checks, quick tasks and engaging quiz competitions enables students to assess their understanding of the different topics and prioritise their work going forward.
Metals and non-metals
GJHeducation

Metals and non-metals

(2)
A fun, engaging and detailed lesson presentation (29 slides) on the properties of metals and non-metals. This lesson focuses on the key properties and their key terms such as malleable and ductile. A number of quick competitions are used to introduce these terms to the students and once provided with the definitions, the students are expected to put these properties correctly with the metals (or non-metals). Progress checks occur throughout the lesson so that the understanding of the students can be checked. This lesson is designed for both KS3 and GCSE students.
Competition and Interdependence
GJHeducation

Competition and Interdependence

(0)
A detailed and engaging lesson presentation (52 slides) and accompanying worksheet that looks at competition between organisms and the different types of relationships that exist as a result of this interaction. The lesson begins by looking at the meaning of the biological term, "competition", and then introduces this when it occurs between the same species and different species. Students are challenged to consider the different resources that animals compete for before an activity based competition is used to get them to recognise how this competition can cause changes to the population size. Moving forwards, students will meet the three main types of ecological relationship and look at them in greater detail, with predation being a main focus. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson (with displayed answers) so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students but can be used with more-able KS3 students who are looking at ecosystems and the relationships that exist within them
Autosomal Linkage
GJHeducation

Autosomal Linkage

(3)
An informative lesson presentation (25 slides) that guides students through the topic of autosomal linkage, so that they can understand how phenotypic ratios can be used to make suggestions about genetic inheritance. The lesson begins by introducing students to the fact that more than one gene are found on each chromosome and therefore the likelihood of these genes being inherited together increases, which is known as linkage. Students will be given numerous results of genetic crosses and shown how to use the number of original phenotypes and the number of recombinants to make judgements about the loci of the genes on the chromosome and how much affect crossing over had on the results. There are regular progress checks so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been designed for A level Biology students
Osmosis
GJHeducation

Osmosis

(0)
A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the topic of osmosis and how the movement of water between a cell and the solution can affect the appearance of an animal and a plant cell. This lesson includes a detailed and engaging lesson presentation (42 slides) and differentiated worksheets that include exam questions that can be set as homework. There is a lot of key terminology associated with this topic and time is taken to ensure that students understand the meaning of each of these terms before moving forwards. Students are introduced to the different types of solutions and then a step-by-step guide is used to show them how to compare the water potential of the solution and the cell and then how this will determine which was water moves. The main task is differentiated so that students are challenged and can access the work. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is also suitable for A-level students
Evidence for Evolution
GJHeducation

Evidence for Evolution

(1)
A detailed lesson presentation (37 slides) and associated worksheets that looks at the different pieces of evidence that scientists use to support evolution and discusses how these support the theory. The lesson begins by challenging students to decide which piece of evidence is the key piece in supporting evolution (fossils). Students will then have to arrange a number of statements to describe how a fossil is formed. Students are introduced to the fossil record and questions are used to check that they understand where the oldest fossils would be found. Moving forwards, students are given three pieces of evidence that would be observed in the fossil record and they are challenged to explain how each of these supports the theory of evolution. Quick competitions are then used to get the students to see some extinct organisms in the Dodo and Woolly Mammoth and again they are questioned on how extinct animals support the theory of evolution. Further evidence in rapid changes in species and molecular comparison is discussed. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding and there is a set homework included.
AQA GCSE Biology Unit B1 (Cell Biology) REVISION
GJHeducation

AQA GCSE Biology Unit B1 (Cell Biology) REVISION

(0)
An engaging lesson presentation (58 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit B1 of the AQA GCSE Biology specification. The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Eukaryotes and prokaryotes Animal and plant cells Microscopy Chromosomes Diffusion Osmosis Active transport Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like "A QUESTION of CELLS" and "Take the Hotseat" whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
Treating CVD
GJHeducation

Treating CVD

(0)
An engaging lesson presentation (30 slides) that looks at the different methods that are used to treat cardiovascular diseases. The lesson begins by looking at the surgical procedure of heart bypass before exploring the use of stents to widen a partially blocked artery. Links are made back to previous knowledge when discussing valves and students are challenged to explain why a faulty valve must be replaced. The rest of the lesson focusses on treating CVD with medicines such as statins and antiplatelets and students will learn the side-effects associated with these drugs. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students but is suitable for all ages
Electrical POWER
GJHeducation

Electrical POWER

(0)
This is a fully-resourced lesson that is written for GCSE students and focuses on the calculations associated with the numerous equations that electrical power is found in. The lesson includes a fast-paced lesson presentation and a series of questions on a worksheet which has been differentiated two ways. Over the course of the lesson, the students will meet the different equations which include the factor of electrical power. Their whole range of mathematical skills will be tested, including rearranging the formula, conversion between units and simplifying two equations into one. The understanding of each of these skills and equations is checked through a range of tasks, each of which has a displayed mark scheme and explanation at the end so that students can self-assess their understanding. Students are encouraged to discuss and come up with insightful questions and answers.
Diabetes Type I and II
GJHeducation

Diabetes Type I and II

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A detailed and engaging lesson presentation (43 slides) and accompanying worksheets that introduces students to the disease, Diabetes (mellitus), and focusses on the similarities and differences between types I and II. The lesson begins by challenging the students mathematically to get the answers 1 and 2 and then to see whether they can link these numbers to a disease. A variety of tasks, which includes competitions and progress checks, are used to get the students to recognise the differences and state which of the types they belong to. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students and can be used with higher level students. However, a lesson more appropriate for A-level Biology students is named “Diabetes Mellitus Type I and II” and is available in my resources
Epistasis
GJHeducation

Epistasis

(0)
This is a fully-resourced lesson that looks at the gene interaction called epistasis and guides the students through writing detailed explanations of how the phenotypes are determined by either dominant, recessive or complimentary epistasis. This topics tends to be poorly understood by students as they find it difficult to express in words how one phenotype or another results so time is taken to use exemplar answers and worked examples to show them how it is done. Students will come to recognise the phenotypic ratios that are associated with each of the interactions so they can identify them in the assessments. Progress checks have been written into the lesson at regular intervals so that students are constantly assessing their understanding and any misconceptions can be addressed. This lesson has been designed for A-level students (aged 16+ in the UK)
OCR GCSE Biology REVISION LESSONS
GJHeducation

OCR GCSE Biology REVISION LESSONS

6 Resources
This bundle of 6 engaging and motivating lesson presentations and associated worksheets uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to test the students on their knowledge of the 6 modules found within the OCR Gateway A GCSE Biology specification. The knowledge of Modules B1 (Cell-level systems), B2 (Scaling up), B3 (Organism-level systems), B4 (Community-level systems), B5 (Genes, inheritance and selection) and B6 (Global challenges) can be assessed using these lessons.
AQA GCSE Combined Science P1 (Energy) REVISION
GJHeducation

AQA GCSE Combined Science P1 (Energy) REVISION

(0)
An engaging lesson presentation (41 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit P1 (Energy) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification unit P6.1). The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Energy stores and systems Changes in energy Efficiency Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “ERRORS with the equation calculations” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
Pure and impure substances
GJHeducation

Pure and impure substances

(0)
An engaging lesson presentation (39 slides) with associated differentiated worksheets that looks at they key differences between pure and impure substances and briefly explores how a mixture like an alloy can still be very useful. The lesson begins by challenging the students to recognise 4 diagrams of pure substances from a selection of 5. This will lead students to the definition of pure (in Science) which is likely to be different to what they have encountered in everyday language. The next task gets the students to draw a graph showing the melting and boiling points of pure water. This will enable them to compare the melting point against that of an impure substance and therefore recognise that this difference can be used as point to decide on purity. An example of gritting is used to explain how this change in melting point can be utilised and then the students are challenged to apply this new-found knowledge to the situation of adding salt to boiling water when making pasta. The remainder of the lesson focuses on some famous mixtures. Beginning with air, students will be able to visualise how this mixture is made of a number of gases, each with different boiling points which allows them to be separated by fractional distillation. Alloys are briefly explored so that students know why these mixtures are used for certain functions over pure metals and the summary passage for this task has been differentiated two ways so that all can access the work. Progress checks have been written into the lesson at regular intervals so that students can check their understanding and a range of quick quiz competitions are used to maintain engagement whilst introducing new terms in a fun manner. If you want to look into alloys in greater detail, then this lesson could be combined with the one named “alloys” which is also uploaded.
AQA GCSE Science C2 REVISION (Bonding, structure and properties of matter)
GJHeducation

AQA GCSE Science C2 REVISION (Bonding, structure and properties of matter)

(0)
An engaging lesson presentation (70 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit C2 (Bonding, structure and properties of matter) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification point C5.2) The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Chemical bonds Ionic bonding Ionic compounds Properties of ionic compounds Covalent bonding Metallic bonding Properties of metals and alloys The three states of matter State symbols Structure and bonding of carbon Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “The name’s BOND…” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
Sampling techniques
GJHeducation

Sampling techniques

(0)
A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the different sampling methods that can be used to estimate the populations of animals and plants in a habitat and to analyse how their distribution is affected, The lesson includes a detailed and engaging lesson presentation (56 slides) and differentiated worksheets so that students of different abilities are challenged and can access the work. The lesson begins by looking at the use of a quadrat to estimate the population of plants in a habitat. There is a focus on the mathematical calculations associated with the method and students are given hints and worked examples so that any common misconceptions are addressed. Moving forwards, students are introduced to the capture-mark-recapture technique to sample animals. The rest of the lesson looks at alternative pieces of apparatus, such as the sweep net, and discusses situations when these would be used. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is appropriate for both younger students who are learning about ecology and also for A-level students who need a recap on this topic.
AQA GCSE Chemistry C3 REVISION (Quantitative chemistry)
GJHeducation

AQA GCSE Chemistry C3 REVISION (Quantitative chemistry)

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An engaging lesson presentation (80 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit C3 (Quantitative chemistry) of the AQA GCSE Chemistry specification (specification point C4.3). The lesson includes useful hints and tips to encourage success in assessments. For example, students are shown how to recognise whether to use Avogadro’s constant or the moles formula in a moles calculation question. The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Conservation of mass and balanced symbol equations Relative formula mass Mass changes when a reactant or product is a gas Moles Amounts of substances in equations Concentration of solutions Atom economy Molar volume Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “Number CRAZY” and “In the BALANCE” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
Homeostasis
GJHeducation

Homeostasis

(4)
A concise lesson presentation (19 slides) and associated worksheet (newspaper articles) that introduces students to the process of homeostasis in the human body and the three main factors (water potential, blood glucose, temperature) that are controlled by this system. The lesson begins by getting the students to work out a code to give them an exemplary definition for homeostasis. A newspaper article is used to get the students to recognise the three factors that are controlled. A quick competition is used to show the students the main parts of any homeostatic control system. This lesson is designed for GCSE students but could be used with both KS3 and A-level as a quick recap
The Collision Theory
GJHeducation

The Collision Theory

(0)
A concise lesson presentation (20 slides) that looks at how the collision theory is related to the rate of reaction. This is a short lesson that would be taught at the beginning of the topic that looks at the rate of reaction and the factors that affect the rate. Students are challenged with a quick competition that gets them to recognise keywords which are involved in the collision theory. Some time is then taken to focus on "activation energy" and how this is shown on a reaction profile. Finally, students will use their keywords to form a clear definition for the collision theory which includes its link to the rate of reaction so this can be used in the upcoming lessons This lesson has ultimately been designed for GCSE students but can be used with all age groups as an introduction to the topic