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A Science teacher by trade, I've also been known to be found teaching Maths and PE! However, strange as it may seem, my real love is designing resources that can be used by other teachers to maximise the experience of the students. I am constantly thinking of new ways to engage a student with a topic and try to implement that in the design of the lessons.

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A Science teacher by trade, I've also been known to be found teaching Maths and PE! However, strange as it may seem, my real love is designing resources that can be used by other teachers to maximise the experience of the students. I am constantly thinking of new ways to engage a student with a topic and try to implement that in the design of the lessons.
AQA GCSE Science B7 REVISION (Ecology)
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AQA GCSE Science B7 REVISION (Ecology)

(1)
An engaging lesson presentation (63 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within the Biology unit B7 (Ecology) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification unit B4.7). The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Communities Abiotic factors Biotic factors Levels of organisation Recycling materials Deforestation Global warming Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “Number CRAZY" whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
AQA A-level Biology REVISION LESSONS
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AQA A-level Biology REVISION LESSONS

8 Resources
This bundle of 8 revision lessons covers all of the topics on the AQA A-level Biology specification: Topic 1: Biological molecules Topic 2: Cells Topic 3: Organisms exchange substances with their environment Topic 4: Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms Topic 5: Energy transfers in and between organisms Topic 6: Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments Topic 7: Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems Topic 8: The control of gene expression These lessons use a range of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to motivate and engage the students whilst they assess their understanding of the different topics and evaluate which areas of the specification will require their further attention. These lessons can be used for revision at the end of the topic, in the lead up to mocks or in the lead up to the actual exams.
Writing half equations for electrolysis
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Writing half equations for electrolysis

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A fully-resourced lesson which includes a lesson presentation (24 slides) and a worksheet which is differentiated so that students can judge their understanding of the topic of writing half equations for electrolysis and access the work accordingly. The lesson uses worked examples and helpful hints to show the students how to write half equations at both the cathode and anode. Time is taken to remind students about the rules at the electrodes when the electrolyte is in solution so that they can work out the products before writing the equations. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 years old in the UK) but could be used with older students.
Rearranging the formula (Maths in Science)
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Rearranging the formula (Maths in Science)

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An informative lesson presentation (37 slides) and accompanying worksheets that guides students through the different methods that can be used to rearrange formulae as they will be required to do in the Science exams. The lessons shows them how to use traditional Maths methods involving inverse operations and also equation triangles to come to the same result. These are constantly linked to actual examples and questions to show them how this has to be applied. There are regular progress checks, with explained answers, so that students can assess their understanding.
Biodiversity and calculating an index of diversity (AQA A-level Biology)
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Biodiversity and calculating an index of diversity (AQA A-level Biology)

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This lesson describes the meaning of biodiversity, explains how it relates to a range of habitats, and describes how to calculate an index of diversity. The PowerPoint and accompanying worksheets are part of the first in a series of 2 lessons that have been designed to cover the content of topic 4.6 of the AQA A-level Biology specification. The second lesson describes the balance between conservation and farming. A quiz competition called BIOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY SNAP runs over the course of the lesson and this will engage the students whilst challenging them to recognise species, population, biodiversity, community and natural selection from their respective definitions. Once biodiversity as the variety of living organisms in a habitat is revealed, the students will learn that this can relate to a range of habitats, from those in the local area to the Earth. When considering the biodiversity of a local habitat, the need for sampling is discussed and some key details are provided to initially prepare the students for these lessons in topic 7. Moving forwards, the students will learn that it is possible to measure biodiversity within a habitat, within a species and within different habitats so that they can be compared. Species richness as a measure of the number of different species in a community is met and a biological example in the rainforests of Madagascar is used to increase its relevance. The students are introduced to an unfamiliar formula that calculates the heterozygosity index and are challenged to apply their knowledge to this situation, as well as linking a low H value to natural selection. The rest of the lesson focuses on the index of diversity and a 3-step guide is used to walk students through each part of the calculation. This is done in combination with a worked example to allow students to visualise how the formula should be applied to actual figures. Using the method, they will then calculate a value of d for a comparable habitat to allow the two values to be considered and the significance of a higher value is explained. All of the exam-style questions have mark schemes embedded in the PowerPoint to allow students to continuously assess their progress and understanding.
Species and taxonomy (AQA A-level Biology)
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Species and taxonomy (AQA A-level Biology)

(1)
This engaging lesson covers the biological classification of a species, phylogenetic classification and the use of the binomial naming system. The PowerPoint and accompanying resources have been designed to cover point 4.5 of the AQA A-level Biology specification which is titled species and taxonomy. The lesson begins by looking at the meaning of a population in Biology so that the term species can be introduced. A hinny, which is the hybrid offspring of a horse and a donkey, is used to explain how these two organisms must be members of different species because they are unable to produce fertile offspring. Although the art of courting might be lost on humans in the modern world, the marabou stork is used as an example to show how courtship behaviour is an essential precursor to successful mating in most organisms. Students are encouraged to discuss other examples of courtship behaviour, such as the release of pheromones and birdsong, so that their knowledge and understanding is broad. Moving forwards, students will learn that species is the lowest taxon in the modern-day classification hierarchy. A quiz runs throughout the lesson and this particular round will engage the students whilst they learn the names of the other 7 taxa and the horse and the donkey from the earlier example are used to complete the hierarchy. Students will understand that the binomial naming system was introduced by Carl Linnaeus to provide a universal name for each species and they will be challenged to apply their knowledge by completing a hierarchy for a modern-day human, by spotting the correct name for an unfamiliar organism and finally by suggesting advantages of this system. The final part of the lesson briefly looks at how advances in genome sequencing and the comparison of common biological molecules has allowed the relationships between organisms to be clarified. This is a detailed lesson and it is estimated that it will take around 2 hours of A-level teaching time to cover the content and therefore this specification point.
Water transport in the xylem (AQA A-level Biology)
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Water transport in the xylem (AQA A-level Biology)

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This fully-resourced lesson describes how the structure of the xylem tissue allows water to be transported in the stem and leaves. Written for AQA A-level Biology, the engaging and detailed PowerPoint and the accompanying worksheets cover the 1st part of specification point 3.4.2 (mass transport in plants) and includes a detailed description of the cohesion-tension theory. The first part of the lesson focuses on the relationship between the structure and function of the xylem tissue. A number of quiz competitions have been included in the lesson to maintain engagement and to introduce key terms. The 1st round does just that and results in the introduction of lignin which leads into the explanation of how the impregnation of this substance in the cell walls result in the death and subsequent decay of the cell structures. Students are encouraged to discuss how the formation of this hollow tube enables the transport of water to be effective. Moving forwards, other structures such as the bordered pits are introduced and an understanding of their function is tested later in the lesson. The remainder of the lesson focuses on the transport of water in the stem and leaves by root pressure and the transpiration pull, which includes cohesion, tension and adhesion. The lesson has been designed to make links to information covered earlier in the lesson as well to topics from earlier in the specification such as cell structures and biological molecules Due to the extensiveness of this lesson, it is estimated that it will take in excess of 2/3 A-level teaching hours to cover the detail included in this lesson.
AQA GCSE Science C2 REVISION (Bonding, structure and properties of matter)
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AQA GCSE Science C2 REVISION (Bonding, structure and properties of matter)

(1)
An engaging lesson presentation (70 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit C2 (Bonding, structure and properties of matter) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification point C5.2) The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Chemical bonds Ionic bonding Ionic compounds Properties of ionic compounds Covalent bonding Metallic bonding Properties of metals and alloys The three states of matter State symbols Structure and bonding of carbon Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “The name’s BOND…” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
Ecosystems and biomass (AQA A-level Biology)
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Ecosystems and biomass (AQA A-level Biology)

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This concise lesson acts as an introduction to topic 5.3, Energy and Ecosystems, and describes how plant biomass is formed, measured and estimated. The engaging PowerPoint is the 1st in a series of 3 lessons which have been designed to cover the detailed content of topic 5.3 of the AQA A-level Biology specification. A quiz round called REVERSE Biology Bingo runs throughout the lesson and challenges students to recognise the following key terms from descriptions called out by the bingo caller: community ecosystem abiotic factor photosynthesis respiratory substrate biomass calorimetry The ultimate aim of this quiz format is to support the students to understand that any sugars produced by photosynthesis that are not used as respiratory substrates are used to form biological molecules that form the biomass of a plant and that this can be estimated using calorimetry. Due to the clear link to photosynthesis, a series of prior knowledge checks are used to challenge the students on their knowledge of this cellular reaction but as this is the first lesson in the topic, the final section of the lesson looks forwards and introduces the chemical energy store in the plant biomass as NPP and students will also meet GPP and R so they are partially prepared for the next lesson.
Investigating diversity (AQA A-level Biology)
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Investigating diversity (AQA A-level Biology)

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This lesson describes how genetic diversity within, or between species, can be investigated by comparison of characteristics or biological molecules. The PowerPoint and accompanying worksheets are primarily designed to cover the content of point 4.7 of the AQA A-level Biology specification but as this is the last lesson in the topic, it has also been planned to contain a range of questions, tasks and quiz rounds that will challenge the students on their knowledge and understanding of topic 4. Over the course of the lesson, the students will discover that comparisons of measurable or observable characteristics, DNA and mRNA sequences and the primary structure of common proteins can all be used to investigate diversity. Links are continually made to prior learning, such as the existence of convergent evolution as evidence of the need to compare biological molecules as opposed to the simple comparison of phenotypes. The issues associated with a limited genetic diversity are discussed and the interesting biological example of the congenital dysfunctions consistently found in the Sumatran tigers in captivity in Australia and New Zealand is used to demonstrate the problems of a small gene pool. Moving forwards, the study of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene by Carl Woese is introduced and students will learn that this led to the adoption of the three-domain system in 1990. The final part of the lesson describes how the primary structure of proteins like cytochrome c that is involved in respiration and is therefore found in most living organisms can be compared and challenges the students to demonstrate their understanding of protein synthesis when considering the differences between humans and rhesus monkeys.
AQA GCSE Combined Science Unit P4 (Atomic Structure) REVISION
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AQA GCSE Combined Science Unit P4 (Atomic Structure) REVISION

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An engaging lesson presentation (48 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within unit P4 (Atomic structure) of the AQA GCSE Combined Science specification (specification point P6.4). The topics that are tested within the lesson include: The structure of an atom Isotopes Radioactive decay and nuclear radiation Nuclear equations Half-lives Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “It’s as easy as ABG” and “ALPHA or BETA” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention
Topic 4: Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms (AQA A-level Biology)
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Topic 4: Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms (AQA A-level Biology)

16 Resources
Every one of the lessons included in this bundle is detailed, engaging and fully-resourced, and has been written to cover the content as detailed in topic 4 of the AQA A-level Biology specification. The wide range of activities will maintain engagement whilst supporting the explanations of the content to allow the students to build a deep understanding of genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms. The following 16 lessons covering the 7 sub-topics are included in this bundle: 4.1: DNA, genes and chromosomes DNA in prokaryotes and eukaryotes Genes 4.2: DNA and protein synthesis Genome, proteome and the structure of RNA Transcription and splicing Translation 4.3: Genetic diversity can arise as a result of mutation or during meiosis The genetic code Gene mutations Chromosome mutations Meiosis 4.4: Genetic diversity and adaptation Genetic diversity Natural selection Adaptations 4.5: Species and taxonomy Species and taxonomy 4.6: Biodiversity within a community Biodiversity within a community Calculating an index of diversity 4.7: Investigating diversity Investigating diversity Interpreting mean values and the standard deviation If you would like to sample the quality of the lessons in this bundle, then download the DNA in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, structure of RNA, gene mutations, natural selection and standard deviation lessons as these have been uploaded for free
Module 4: Biodiversity, evolution and disease (OCR A-level Biology A)
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Module 4: Biodiversity, evolution and disease (OCR A-level Biology A)

16 Resources
The detailed content, exam-style questions, guided discussion points and quiz competitions that are found in each of the 16 paid lessons that are included in this bundle (as well as the 5 free lessons which are named at the bottom) cover the following specification points in module 4 of the OCR A-level Biology A specification: Module 4.1.1 The different types of pathogen that can cause communicable diseases in plants and animals The means of transmission of animal and plant communicable pathogens The primary non-specific defences against pathogens in animals The structure and mode of action of phagocytes The structure, different roles and modes of action of B and T lymphocytes in the specific immune response The primary and secondary immune responses The structure and general functions of antibodies An outline of the action of opsonins, agglutinins and anti-toxins The differences between active and passive immunity, and between natural and artificial immunity Autoimmune diseases The principles of vaccination Module 4.2.1 How biodiversity can be considered at different levels The random and non-random sampling strategies that are carried out to measure the biodiversity of a habitat How to measure species richness and species evenness The use and interpretation of Simpson’s Index of Diversity How genetic biodiversity may be assessed The ecological, economic and aesthetic reasons for maintaining biodiversity In situ and ex situ methods of maintaining biodiversity International and local conservation agreements made to protect species and habitats 4.2.2 The biological classification of species The binomial system of naming species and the advantage of such a system The features used to classify organisms into the five kingdoms The evidence that has led to new classification systems The different types of variation Using the standard deviation to measure the spread of a set of data Using the Student’s t-test to compare means of data values of two populations Using the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient to consider the relationship of the data The different types of adaptations to their environment The mechanism by which natural selection can affect the characteristics of a population over time How evolution in some species has an impact on human populations If you would like to get an idea of the quality of the lessons that are included in this bundle, then download the following five OCR A lessons which have been uploaded for free: Immunity & vaccinations Reasons for maintaining biodiversity Taxonomic hierarchy and the binomial naming system Adaptations and natural selection Transmission of animal and plant pathogens
Edexcel GCSE Physics PAPER 2 REVISION LESSONS
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Edexcel GCSE Physics PAPER 2 REVISION LESSONS

6 Resources
All of the lessons in this bundle are fully-resourced and have been designed to challenge the students on their knowledge of the topics which can be assessed in PAPER 2 of the Pearson Edexcel GCSE Physics specification. The content in the following topics is covered by these lessons: Topic 1: Key concepts in Physics Topic 8: Energy - forces doing work Topic 9: Forces and their effects Topic 10: Electricity and circuits Topic 12: Magnetism and the motor effect Topic 13: Electromagnetic induction Topic 14: Particle model Topic 15: Forces and matter The PowerPoints and accompanying resources contain a wide range of activities which include exam-style questions with clear explanations of the answer, differentiated tasks and quiz competitions. There is also a big emphasis on the mathematical element of the specification and students are guided through the use of a range of skills which include the conversion of units and the rearrange of formulae to change the subject.
Genetic biodiversity (OCR A-level Biology)
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Genetic biodiversity (OCR A-level Biology)

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This fully-resourced lesson describes genetic biodiversity as the number of genes in a population and considers how it can be assessed. The engaging PowerPoint and accompanying differentiated resources have been primarily designed to cover point 4.2.1 (e) of the OCR A-level Biology A specification but also introduces inheritance and codominance so that students are prepared for these genetic topics when they are covered in module 6.1.2 In order to understand that 2 or more alleles can be found at a gene loci, students need to be confident with genetic terminology. Therefore the start of the lesson focuses on key terms including gene, locus, allele, recessive, genotype and phenotype. A number of these will have been met at GCSE, as well as during the earlier lessons in module 2.1.3 when considering meiosis, so a quick quiz competition is used to check on their recall of the meanings of these terms. The CFTR gene is then used as an example to demonstrate how 2 alleles results in 2 different phenotypes and therefore genetic diversity. Moving forwards, students will discover that more than 2 alleles can be found at a locus and they are challenged to work out genotypes and phenotypes for a loci with 3 alleles (shell colour in snails) and 4 alleles (coat colour in rabbits). Two calculations are provided to the students that can calculate the % of loci with more than one allele and the proportion of polymorphic gene loci. At this point, the students are introduced to codominance and again they are challenged to apply their understanding to a new situation by working out the number of phenotypes in the inheritance of blood groups. The lesson concludes with a brief consideration of the HLA gene loci, which is the most polymorphic loci in the human genome, and students are challenged to consider how this sheer number of alleles can affect the chances of tissue matches in organ transplantation
Types of selection (AQA A-level Biology)
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Types of selection (AQA A-level Biology)

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This engaging and fully-resourced lesson looks at the effects of stabilising, directional and disruptive selection as the three main types of selection. The PowerPoint and accompanying resources have been designed to cover the 3rd part of point 7.3 of the AQA A-level Biology specification which states that students should be able to identify each type of selection by its effect on different phenotypes. The lesson begins with an introduction to the mark, release, recapture method to calculate numbers of rabbits with different coloured fur in a particular habitat. This method is covered later in topic 7 so this section of the lesson is designed purely to generate changes in numbers of the organisms. Sketch graphs are then constructed to show the changes in the population size in this example. A quick quiz competition is used to engage the students whilst introducing the names of the three main types of selection before a class discussion point encourages the students to recognise which specific type of selection is represented by the rabbits. Key terminology including intermediate and extreme phenotypes and selection pressure are used to emphasise their importance during explanations. A change in the environment of the habitat and a change in the numbers of the rabbits introduces directional selection before students will be given time to discuss and to predict the shape of the sketch graph for disruptive selection. Students are challenged to apply their knowledge in the final task of the lesson by choosing the correct type of selection when presented with details of a population and answer related questions.
Limiting reactants and stoichiometry
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Limiting reactants and stoichiometry

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This is a fully-resourced lesson that looks at the meaning of a limiting reactant in a chemical reaction and guides students through how to apply this to a number of calculations. Step by step guides are used to go through worked examples so students are able to visualise how to set out their work. The lesson begins with a fun analogy involving sausages and potatoes so that students can identify that the potatoes limited the sale of food. Alongside this, students will learn the key term excess. Some time is then taken to ensure that students can spot the limiting reactant and the one in excess in actual chemical reactions and method descriptions. Moving forwards, students will be guided through two calculations that involve limiting reactants - those to calculate the theoretical yield and the other to calculate a balanced symbol equation. Other skills involved in these calculations such as calculating the relative formula mass are recalled and a few examples given to ensure they are confident. The question worksheet has been differentiated two ways so that any students who need extra assistance can still access the learning. This lesson has been written for GCSE students.
The mole and mole calculations
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The mole and mole calculations

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A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the meaning of the mole and shows how this measurement is used in calculations. The lesson includes a clear lesson presentation (32 slides) and a set of questions. This lesson has been written to explain in a concise manner so that the key details are understood and embedded. Students are shown how to recognise when a mole calculation requires them to use Avogadro’s constant and when they should the formula including the relative formula mass. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 -16 year olds in the UK)
Surface area to volume ratio
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Surface area to volume ratio

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An engaging lesson presentation (16 slides) which looks at the surface area to volume ratio and ensures that students can explain why this factor is so important to the organisation of living organisms. This is a topic which is generally poorly misunderstood by students and therefore time has been taken to design an engaging lesson which highlights the key points in order to encourage greater understanding. The lesson begins by showing students the dimensions of a cube and two answers and challenges them to work out what the questions were that produced these answers. Students are shown how to calculate the surface area and the volume of an object before it is explained how this can then be turned into a ratio. Time is taken at this point to ensure that students can apply this new-found knowledge as they have to work out which of the three organisms in the “SA: V OLYMPICS” would stand aloft the podium. Students are given the opportunity to draw conclusions from this task so that they can recognise that the larger the organism, the lower the surface area to volume ratio. The lesson finishes by explaining how larger organisms, like humans, have adapted in order to increase the surface area at important exchange surfaces in their bodies. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson to allow the students to check on their understanding. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but is perfectly suitable for A-level students who want to look at this topic from a basic level
AQA GCSE Chemistry Topic 3 REVISION (Quantitative chemistry)
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AQA GCSE Chemistry Topic 3 REVISION (Quantitative chemistry)

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An engaging lesson presentation (80 slides) and associated worksheets that uses a combination of exam questions, quick tasks and quiz competitions to help the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within Topic 3 (Quantitative chemistry) of the AQA GCSE Chemistry specification (specification point C4.3). The lesson includes useful hints and tips to encourage success in assessments. For example, students are shown how to recognise whether to use Avogadro’s constant or the moles formula in a moles calculation question. The topics that are tested within the lesson include: Conservation of mass and balanced symbol equations Relative formula mass Mass changes when a reactant or product is a gas Moles Amounts of substances in equations Concentration of solutions Atom economy Molar volume Students will be engaged through the numerous activities including quiz rounds like “Number CRAZY” and “In the BALANCE” whilst crucially being able to recognise those areas which need further attention