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I'm a Science teacher of 13 years who is passionate about designing and developing lessons to maximise progress in my classroom. I truly believe that making the Powerpoints as professional as possible can raise engagement and I pride myself on creating new tasks and ideas to motivate all. I hope you enjoy the lessons I've shared!

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I'm a Science teacher of 13 years who is passionate about designing and developing lessons to maximise progress in my classroom. I truly believe that making the Powerpoints as professional as possible can raise engagement and I pride myself on creating new tasks and ideas to motivate all. I hope you enjoy the lessons I've shared!
Circuit calculations (in series and parallel)

Circuit calculations (in series and parallel)

A detailed lesson presentation which guides students through calculating the current, potential difference and resistance in series and parallel circuits. The lesson begins by challenging the students to recognise whether three displayed facts relate to series or parallel circuits. Students are then given a chance to remind themselves of the differences between the circuits in terms of these three physical factors. The rest of the lesson uses a step-by-step guide format to show the students how to work through a circuit calculation by combining their knowledge of the circuit with application of the V = IR equation. Progress checks have been written throughout the lesson so that students can constantly assess their understanding. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students
GJHeducation
Stopping distances

Stopping distances

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the meaning of thinking, braking and stopping distances and focuses on the factors that would cause each of them to increase. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (45 slides) and an associated worksheet for the calculations. The lesson begins by introducing the term stopping distance and then challenging students to recognise that both the distance travelled during the driver’s reaction time and under the braking force will contribute to this. Students are constantly challenged to think about the factors that would cause either the thinking or braking distance to increase and to be able to explain why scientifically. Moving forwards, the mathematical element that is associated with this topic is explored as students are shown how to calculate the braking distance at different speeds as well as convert between speeds in miles per hour and metres per second. There is also a set homework included as part of the lesson. There are regular progress checks written into the lesson so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with those at KS3.
GJHeducation
Prokaryotic cells

Prokaryotic cells

A lesson presentation (and associated worksheets) that looks at the features of prokaryotic cells and ensures that students are aware of the main differences between these cells and their eukaryotic counterparts. The lesson begins by reminding students of the definition of an eukaryotic cell and then challenges them to recognise what is the main difference in a prokaryotic cell. The similarities between the cells are also considered, mainly through the use of the Venn diagram as shown in the picture. Moving forwards, the extra features that are found in some bacterial cells are introduced to the student (through the use of a competition format). There is a big emphasis on key terminology throughout the lesson so that students are not confused when these technical terms are used in assessment questions. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with A-level Biology students who are recapping on the topic of cells.
GJHeducation
Antibiotics

Antibiotics

An engaging lesson presentation and associated worksheet that looks at the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections and the raises the issue of the potential over-use of these substances. The lesson begins by getting the students to recognise the difference between three key terms that begin with anti (antibiotics, antivirals, antiseptics). Students will be introduced to the idea that antibiotics are specific to a small range of bacteria and therefore the correct one has to be selected before being prescribed. Moving forwards, students will meet the idea of the zone of inhibition and will understand how the size of this zone can be used as an indicator to the effectiveness of the treatment. Students are shown how to calculate the size of the zone and then are tested on their ability to apply this mathemetical knowledge. Finally, time is taken to look at the links to the topic of natural selection to explain how some bacteria are resistant to certain antibiotics. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students but could be used as an introduction with A-level Biology students who are about to begin the topic of immunity.
GJHeducation
Electromagnetic Waves

Electromagnetic Waves

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the 7 electromagnetic waves, their differences, similarities and uses. The lesson includes an engaging presentation (54 slides) and associated worksheets. The lesson begins with a number of engaging activities to get the students to find out the names of the 7 waves in the spectrum. Students will be challenged to use their knowledge of the properties of waves to explain why they have been arranged in this particular order. Moving forwards, some time is taken to ensure that students recognise the similarities of the waves. The rest of the lesson focuses on the uses of the waves and a homework is also set to get students to increase the number of uses that they know for each wave. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding at critical points. This lesson has primarily been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but could be used with students at KS3 who are doing a project
GJHeducation
Detecting gases

Detecting gases

An engaging lesson presentation (37 slides) which gets students to test their practical skills by carrying out the four identification tests for oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and chlorine. The lesson begins by using a competition called “Guess the gas” where students have to used clues to identify the four colourless gases which will be used in the lesson. Moving forwards, students will meet the pieces of equipment that will be used in these tests. Practical instructions for each of the tests are included in the lesson so that students can produce the gas and then carry out the test. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson is suitable for both KS3 and GCSE students
GJHeducation
Graphene and the fullerenes

Graphene and the fullerenes

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at a number of the allotropes of carbon which need to be known for GCSE Science. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (40 slides) and associated worksheets. The lesson begins by recalling the definition of an allotrope. Students are then introduced to graphene and will understand how this is related to graphite and know the properties of these two materials that are shared. Time is taken to ensure that students can explain why graphene is able to conduct electricity. Moving forwards, students will meet the family of allotropes known as the fullerenes and will see some important details about a few of these. This lesson has been written for students studying GCSE (14 - 16 year olds in the UK).
GJHeducation
Concentration of solutions

Concentration of solutions

A fully-resourced lesson that teaches students how to calculate the concentration of a solution in the units grams per decimetres cubed and mol per decimetre cubed. The lesson includes a concise but detailed lesson presentation (20 slides) and a set of differentiated questions. The lesson begins by introducing students to volumes in decimetres cubed and time is taken to ensure that students are able to convert to this measurement. Moving forwards, students are guided through how to calculate the concentration in both units through the use of worked examples. Differentiated questions are available so that all abilities can access the work. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but could be used with students who are beginning their A level Chemistry studies
GJHeducation
Chi-squared test

Chi-squared test

A fully-resourced lesson that guides students through the use of the chi-squared test to test whether there is a significant difference between the observed and expected results of a genetic cross. This lesson includes a detailed lesson presentation (35 slides) and differentiated practice questions on a worksheet. The lesson begins by introducing the formula and then ensuring that students understand what this test is used for. A step-by-step guide is then used to answer an example question. Time is taken to go over critical areas where students commonly make mistakes or where time can be saved, such as knowing the expected ratio rather than having to carry out a genetic diagram. Students are shown how to use the table to identify the critical value and then understand whether to accept or reject the null hypothesis depending on the comparison. The rest of the lesson provides an opportunity for students to apply their new knowledge by answering two practice questions. These have been differentiated so that all abilities can access the work and be challenged. This lesson has been designed for A-level students (16+ in the UK)
GJHeducation
Simpson's Diversity Index

Simpson's Diversity Index

A fully-resourced lesson that guides students through measuring biodiversity in a habitat through use of the Simpson’s diversity index. The lesson includes a lesson presentation (19 slides) and a series of worksheets. Students will learn that this calculation accounts for both species richness and evenness. A step-by-step guide is used to answer an example question so that students can observe how to carry out the different stages. Students are shown how to interpret the result in terms of how this habitat would cope with a change in the environment. The rest of the lesson provides an opportunity for students to apply their new found knowledge in a practice question. This lesson has been designed for A-level students (16+ in the UK)
GJHeducation
Sex-linkage

Sex-linkage

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the inheritance of genes that have their loci on the sex chromosomes. This lesson includes a concise, detailed lesson presentation (27 slides) and a exam question worksheet. The lesson begins by introducing the students to the idea that the 23rd pair of chromosomes in humans are not a homologous pair. Students will see that the Y chromosome is smaller than the X chromosome and will be challenged to explain why males are more likely to suffer from diseases which are carried on the X chromosome. Moving forwards, students are shown how to draw genetic diagrams to carry out crosses including sex-linked characteristics. Time is taken to ensure that students are clear on how to write the parent genotypes and gametes before starting the cross as this is an area where mistakes are commonly made. There are progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been written for students studying A-level Biology but can be used with those students studying Biology at GCSE where this topic has now entered some of the specifications.
GJHeducation
Edexcel A-level Biology Topic 7 REVISION (Run for your life)

Edexcel A-level Biology Topic 7 REVISION (Run for your life)

A fully resourced revision lesson which uses a range of exam questions (with explained answers), quick tasks and quiz competitions to enable the students to assess their understanding of the topics found within Topic 7 (Run for your life) of the EDEXCEL A-level Biology specification. The topics tested within this lesson include: The sliding filament theory Aerobic respiration Lactate and anaerobic respiration The cardiac cycle How heart rate is increased Structure of a muscle fibre Homeostasis Student will enjoy the range of tasks and quiz rounds whilst crucially being able to recognise any areas which require further attention
GJHeducation
Calculating ACCELERATION

Calculating ACCELERATION

A resourced lesson which looks at calculating acceleration using the (v-u)/t equation. This lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (26 slides) and a worksheet of questions that can be used for homework or during the lesson. The lesson begins by looking at the actual meaning of acceleration, ensuring that students understand it is a rate and therefore recognise the units as a result. A number of engaging activities are included in the lesson, such as the ACCELERATION OLYMPICS, to maintain motivation. Students are shown how to rearrange the equation to make velocity or time the subject and then challenged to apply these in a series of questions. Deceleration is briefly mentioned at the end of the lesson. This lesson has been primarily designed for students studying GCSE (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but it is suitable for students at KS3 too.
GJHeducation
Electric current

Electric current

An engaging lesson presentation (30 slides) that looks at electric current and ensures that students know the key details about this factor in preparation for their GCSE studies. The lesson begins by forming a definition for this electrical term and then as the lesson progresses, this definition is broken so that each element is understood. Students will be introduced to the difference between electron flow and conventional current. Time is taken to ensure that students understand that an ammeter must be set up in series. The remainder of the lesson will focus on the mathematical calculations which include current and important skills such as converting between units is covered.] As stated above, this lesson has been designed primarily for those students taking their GCSE exams (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is suitable for younger students too.
GJHeducation
Electrical resistance

Electrical resistance

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the details of the electrical topic of resistance that students need to know for GCSE. The lesson includes a lesson presentation (21 slides) and associated worksheets. The lesson begins by looking at the meaning of resistance and focuses on the connection between resistance and current. Moving forwards, net resistance in series and parallel circuits is introduced and explained.
GJHeducation
Nuclear DECAY equations

Nuclear DECAY equations

A fully resourced lesson which guides students through writing decay equations to represent alpha and beta decay. This lesson includes a lesson presentation (41 slides) and differentiated worksheets. Time is taken at the beginning of the lesson to ensure that students know the sub-atomic particles that are found in an alpha particle and a beta particle so that they can understand why the atomic and mass numbers are affected during the decay. Moving forwards, a step-by-step guide is used to show students how to write both types of equations. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can check their understanding. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK)
GJHeducation
Osmosis

Osmosis

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the topic of osmosis and how the movement of water between a cell and the solution can affect the appearance of an animal and a plant cell. This lesson includes a detailed and engaging lesson presentation (42 slides) and differentiated worksheets that include exam questions that can be set as homework. There is a lot of key terminology associated with this topic and time is taken to ensure that students understand the meaning of each of these terms before moving forwards. Students are introduced to the different types of solutions and then a step-by-step guide is used to show them how to compare the water potential of the solution and the cell and then how this will determine which was water moves. The main task is differentiated so that students are challenged and can access the work. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is also suitable for A-level students
GJHeducation
Active transport

Active transport

A whole lesson on the topic of active transport which includes a concise lesson presentation (20 slides) and a set of questions that are used to check on the students’ understanding. This lesson is designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but could be used with A-level students who are covering the topic of movement across cell membranes. The main focus of the lesson is to get students to understand that this is an active process which moves substances against the concentration gradient and therefore needs energy for this process. The final part of the lesson looks at the different types of questions that can accompany this topic and a step-by-step guide is used to answer a difficult longer answer question as a class.
GJHeducation
Sampling techniques

Sampling techniques

A fully-resourced lesson that looks at the different sampling methods that can be used to estimate the populations of animals and plants in a habitat and to analyse how their distribution is affected, The lesson includes a detailed and engaging lesson presentation (56 slides) and differentiated worksheets so that students of different abilities are challenged and can access the work. The lesson begins by looking at the use of a quadrat to estimate the population of plants in a habitat. There is a focus on the mathematical calculations associated with the method and students are given hints and worked examples so that any common misconceptions are addressed. Moving forwards, students are introduced to the capture-mark-recapture technique to sample animals. The rest of the lesson looks at alternative pieces of apparatus, such as the sweep net, and discusses situations when these would be used. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) but is appropriate for both younger students who are learning about ecology and also for A-level students who need a recap on this topic.
GJHeducation
Structure of DNA - GCSE

Structure of DNA - GCSE

A fully-resourced lesson which looks at the structure of DNA in the detail which is required at GCSE level (14 - 16 year olds in the UK). The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (35 slides) and associated worksheets. The main aim of the lesson is to ensure that students recognise key terminology that comes with this topic such as nucleotide and (nitrogenous) bases. Engaging tasks have been written into the lesson, in order to maintain the motivation, such as when students are introduced to complimentary base pairing through a version of the gameshow “Take me Out”. Additional knowledge is provided at appropriate times in the lesson to stretch and challenge the more able. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding of the structure. As stated above, this lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with younger students and also with A-level students as a means of a recap before they learn about this in greater detail.
GJHeducation
Blood clotting (GCSE)

Blood clotting (GCSE)

A resourced lesson which uses a concise lesson presentation (18 slides) and a differentiated diagram to guide students through the method of blood clotting. This lesson has been designed for students studying GCSE (14 - 16 year olds in the UK) and this is reflected in the appropriate detail where only the involvement of fibrin needs to be known. Students are shown how blood clotting is a cascade effect where one event leads on to the next.
GJHeducation