Hero image

The History Academy

Average Rating4.78
(based on 210 reviews)

All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.

850Uploads

222k+Views

123k+Downloads

All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.
Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

(1)
This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Strengths & Weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Strengths & Weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution

(0)
This engaging lesson has been carefully written to help students understand the key features of the Weimar Constitution and assess both its strengths and weaknesses. After Germany lost the First World War, the Kaiser fled and a new democratic government of Germany was declared in February 1919, at the small town of Weimar. The constitution that was drawn was amongst the most liberal in Europe, However, it contained a number of strengths and weaknesses that played a key part in the instability which helped the Nazis into power. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word Document and an accompanying eleven slide PowerPoint. The Word document contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labeled ‘Strengths’ and ‘Weaknesses’, as well as fourteen cards which describe features of the Weimar Constitution. Once students have assessed which cards are ‘Strengths’ or ‘Weaknesses’ they can then pair them up to the sub headings: President, Chancellor, Reichstag, Proportional Representations, The Voters, Article 48 and the Bill of Rights. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, writing frames, animated diagrams to show the divisions of power, appropriate video clips and activities to help facilitate the lesson. For more information, please see the detailed preview. If used as a stand alone resource, the card sort makes a great starter or plenary to completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Once completed, students will have a detailed summary diagram of the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution. The aims and objectives of this less are: Theme: Weimar Republic 1919 - 1923 Know: What were the key features of the Weimar Constitution? Understand: What were the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution? Evaluate: Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the beginning? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key features of the Weimar Constitution? Explain: What were the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution? Analyse: Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the beginning? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Treaty of Versailles, 1919 SEN Worksheet
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Treaty of Versailles, 1919 SEN Worksheet

(0)
This resource is aimed at foundation and bottom end of core students. It looks at the terms of the Treaty of Versailles as well as how people in Germany and Britain reacted to it. The worksheet includes pictures, maps, missing word activities and questions which increase in their difficulty. The second section also includes some cartoon based questions which students often enjoy doing as they are very accessible and promote a good engagement and discussion. If you like this resource, check out my booklet on the end of the FWW as it contains similar activities and tasks for KS3 students. I have also created a range of card sorts and graphic oprganisers on this topic. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves

(0)
This activity has been carefully designed to help students assess understand the differences between constructive and destructive waves and be used along side any main stream textbook or video. Once complete students should be able to attempt a question on ‘compare the characteristics of constructive and destructive waves.’ When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Constructive’ and ‘Destructive’ waves as well as fourteen information cards and two diagrams that be sorted under them. This resource makes a great starter or plenary to be completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up by the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Alternatively, your students could draw a table with the two headings ‘Constructive’ or ‘Destructive’ and copy out the information under them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Coastal Landscapes Know: What is a ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ wave? Understand: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Evaluate: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The main characteristics of ‘constructive’ and ‘destrictive’ waves? Explain: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Analyse: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow us on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Invaders & Settlers: The Vikings
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Invaders & Settlers: The Vikings

(0)
This lesson is designed as an KS3 introductory module called ‘Invaders and Settlers AD43 - 1066’. It provides an overview of the Viking invasions and their impact on Anglo Saxon England. There is also a focus on the decline and rise again of towns and education, which is a theme which is returned to in other KS3 modules on medieval towns and industrialisation 1750 - 1900. The tasks and activities included in this module are suitable for the full range of ability at KS3 and are designed as a bridge or transition from KS2. One of the activities is on the origin of place names and makes a nice rounding off activity for the theme invaders and settlers, before starting the Norman Conquest. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why was England invaded and settled from 40 AD to 1066? Know: Who were the Vikings and why did they come to Britain? Understand: : How did Alfred the Great defeat the Vikings? Evaluate: What impact did the Vikings invasions have on Britain? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Who were the Vikings and why did they come to Britain? Explain: How did Alfred the Great defeat the Vikings? Analyse: What impact did the Vikings invasions have on Britain? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty five slide PowerPoint Presentation which includes starters, plenaries and a range of interactive resources and activities. These include a snowballing stater, buzz , information slides, the origin of place names, summary tasks, Venn diagrams and links to video clips on the Vikings and their impact on Anglo Saxon England. Everything you need to photocopy is include in the PP> You will need access to You Tube in order to access the video clips. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - Why did Great Britain build an Empire?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort - Why did Great Britain build an Empire?

(0)
This beautifully illustrated lesson has been designed to help students understand why Great Britain wanted to build an empire, This can be quite a challenging topic to teach in an interesting and engaging way, but this tried and tested lesson has been refined in the classroom over many years by experienced teachers. It is suitable for the full ability range and includes eight addition activities to the card sort, which can be mixed and matched to suit your curriculum time and students. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document and a twenty six slide PowerPoint Presentation. The Word Document includes includes a learning objective, instructions, ten heading cards labelled 'Technology’, ‘Trade’, ‘Navy’ , ‘Religion’, ‘Raw Materials’, ‘Competition’, ‘Racism’, ‘Slavery’, ‘Population’ and ‘Power’ as well as 19 statement cards that can be cut out and sorted under them. If you are looking to shorten the time spent on the card sort, you could cut out the cards and keep them in envelopes for students to take out and sort, or you could instead create a colour key to help them identify which headings they wanted to sort them under. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, tasks, activities, information slides, historical sources, pictures, maps, diagrams, templates, feedback sheets and a homework exercise. Once students have completed the card sort, there is a second activity which gets them to write an extended answer to the core question. I would recommend getting your students to use the headings from the card sort to help them organise their answer. For more information, please see the preview slides The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: Why did Great Britain build an Empire? Understand: Why did the British Empire become the largest? Evaluate: Which factors were the most important? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Great Britain build an Empire? Explain: Why did the British Empire become the largest? Analyse: Which factors were the most important? If you are looking for similar resources then please check out our TES shop. If you would like to stay up to date with our latest offerings, then you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal. Kind Regards Roy
What type of a King was Henry II?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

What type of a King was Henry II?

(0)
This fun and engaging has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and produced some brilliant work. It is a great introductory lesson to help set the scene for Henry II’s later conflict with the church and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket. In brief the lesson involves analyzing five historical sources about Henry II, completing a summary table about we can learn from about his personality and then drawing and annotating a picture to help students apply what they have inferred from the evidence This can then be followed up with some more traditional style questions to help consolidate the learning. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a two page worksheet which includes five historical sources, tasks and activities. You can also download an accompanying PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, tasks, activities, templates and links to suitable video links. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why did Henry II fall out with the Archbishop of Canterbury ? Know: Who was Henry II and what type of personality did he have? Understand: How did his personality affect his role as King of England? Evaluate: Sources of information to create an accurate image of Henry II Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The personality and character of Henry II? Explain: How did his personality affect his role as King of England? Analyze: Sources of information to create an accurate image of Henry II If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Great Fire of London, Accident or Arson?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort: Great Fire of London, Accident or Arson?

(2)
This great resource is designed to help students decide whether the Great Fire of London in 1666 was an accident or a deliberate act of arson by foreign Catholic spies. It can be used with the full range of abilities. When you purchase this resource you will download a single page A4 sheet with eleven information cards that contain facts and source extracts. This has been especially designed so that it can be easily photocopied for your students. These information cards are labelled A to K. The instructions on the sheet are as follows: Task 1: Cut out the cards below, sort them under the heading below. Task 2: Use the evidence from the card sort to write an essay to the following question: Was the Great Fire of London in 1666, started by accident or by foreign Catholic spies? The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Restoration? Know: What were the causes of the Great Fire of London in 1666? Understand: What are the arguments for and against the fire being started by accident? Evaluate: Why were foreign Catholic spies blamed for starting the fire? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the causes of the Great Fire of London? Explain: What are the arguments for and against the fire being started by accident? Analyse: Why were Catholic spies blamed for starting the fire? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Elizabethan Poor Law
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

The Elizabethan Poor Law

(1)
This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying how Elizabethan society treated the poor by getting them to look at a number of cases and deciding what should happen next. It has been designed by experienced teachers who have field tested this resource in the classroom, whilst being observed by Ofsted. When you purchase this resource it includes a PowerPoint information, which sets out the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and includes all the information, starters, activities that you will need for this lesson. It also includes a step by step lesson plan and a worksheet, which lists each of the characters problems. Once you have completed the starters and reviewed the information on why the Elizabethan's were worried about poverty, your class will be presented with an avatar who will explain how the Elizabethan Poor Law worked. Simply click on the buttons and the avatar will explain how the Elizabethans decided if someone was deserving or undeserving or whether they should be punished or should receive indoor or outdoor relief? When it comes to the next stage you can either print off copies from the PowerPoint or use the worksheet which contains all the cases. As students review each case they have been given to study, they tick the appropriate boxes on the table that is visible in the preview. Once they have looked at their assigned cases they then feedback to a class discussion. The aims and objectives of this fun and enjoyable lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan Age, 1558 – 1603. Know: What are the causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Understand: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Evaluate: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Explain: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Analyse: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? If you are looking for a fun and enjoyable lesson that will impress any observer, then this lesson ticks all the appropriate boxes and even comes with its own lesson plan. If you want to add an extra bit of sparkle then change the customise some of the locations in the cases. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Christmas Truce, 1914
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

The Christmas Truce, 1914

(0)
These outstanding resources on the Christmas Truce in 1914 are a great lesson no matter the time of year, but they make a particularly moving, touching and inspirational end to the long Autumn Term on the meaning of Christmas. I've provided two resources with this lesson. They can be used in any subject across the curriculum. This topic links to History, Music, RE, PSCHE, English, Drama and Music. The first resource is a worksheet with a series of activities aimed to support a wide spectrum of learners. I've built in extension tasks as well as DART strategies for the less able. The PowerPoint is designed to primarily to support the delivery of the worksheet, but includes the aims and objectives, a snowballing starter for pair and share, differentiated questions for different groups, historical sources and diagrams to help illustrate core ideas as well as carefully selected video and music clips. This is one of my favourite lessons and I am confident that it will quickly become yours as well. Treat yourself to good lesson, avoid the painful Christmas videos at the end of term and create a memorable educational moment in time for your students with this truly inspirational story. You will learn: Theme: What is the meaning of Christmas? Know: What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Understand: Why did the British and German troops hold an unofficial truce? Evaluate: Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Analysis, Evaluation and Judgement. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify = What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Describe = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Explain = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Analyse= Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? The best documentary to watch on this - rather than a Christmas video is: Days that shook the World – The Christmas Truce. See your history department for a copy. If they are worth their salt they will have a copy! I am offering these resources at a knock down price - for a cup of coffee. I was recently made redundant by a multi-academy trust because I was the union rep. If you like my resources then check out the rest on my TES shop or if you fancy a chat about any of my resources or simply want to be kept updated, then you can follow the The History Academy on Twitter, Facebook or You Tube. Anyway, have fun and whatever time of year it is - Peace and Goodwill to all Men and Women. Please help to keep alive the spirit of the Christmas Truce, 1914. Kind Regards Roy https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/
Canals 1750 - 1900
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Canals 1750 - 1900

(0)
This outstanding resource has been designed to put some of the fun back in to the teaching of the industrial revolution by looking at why and how canals were built from 1750 - 1900. The PowerPoint has seven activities built into the presentation. It also includes links to three excellent videos to showcase an aqueduct, how lock gates work and how Navvies built canals. The activities are as follows: Snowballing starter of the key words, three numeracy activities, a review triangle of why businessmen built canals, a heads and tails activity on how engineers built canals and a source annotation exercise of a navvy. The numeracy exercises are easy. You don't need to use calculators but you could allow your students to use their phones / IPads if they have them. There are also three outstanding video clips. Make sure you click on the hyperlinks whilst the show is running. Your students will love this resource, especially the boys. Treat yourself to a break. Download this resource and give yourself more time to spend with your family, whilst being confident in the knowledge that you will being delivering a 'good' to 'outstanding' lesson with your students that they will love and find interesting. This resource can also be uploaded to your school VLE and used as a independent resource for homework. The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution Know: Why were canals built during the Industrial Revolution? Understand: How did canal engineers overcome the problems of building a man made waterway without a current? Evaluate: What impact did canals have on the cost of moving goods? Skills: Numeracy, Cause & Consequence. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why and how were canals built? Explain: Why canals were built and how engineers overcame the shape of the land? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on why Britain underwent a Transport Revolution 1750 – 1900. Have fun and enjoy. Why not check out some of my other resources in my TES shop the History Academy or stay up to date by following me on Twitter or Facebook. Kind Regards Roy
What were the Short Term causes of the English Civil War?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

What were the Short Term causes of the English Civil War?

(0)
This fun and engaging lesson has been written by experienced teachers to help students understand the short term causes of the English Civil War. The lesson picks up from the end of Charles I’s personal rule and examines in depth the problems that he faced from 1640 - 1642. This lesson has been designed for the full ability range. Where appropriate, key slides have been differentiated for core and foundation students. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a eighteen slide Microsoft PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks, activities, starters, plenaries, information slides, links to video clips and templates to help students summarise their learning. Once students have worked their way through the starter exercises, they are presented with a number of problems that faced Charles I from 1640 - 1642. These include religious, financial, the growth of Parliament and his beliefs in the divine rights. Once students have reviewed Charles I’s problems using either the core or foundation slide, they then complete one of several different tasks that you can choose from to help them categorised and prioritised them. Moving on swiftly, the next part of the lesson looks at a series of extracts which help to set into context Charles I’s decision to storm into Parliament and arrest Pym and his supporters. This followed up by an activity making notes from the film Cromwell describing what happened next. The lesson then finishes off by students evaluating how Charles responded to events in Londonwhy Charles I declared war both the long and short term causes r and deciding who was to blame who was to blame Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Short Term Causes of the English Civil War Know: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Understand: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1641? Evaluate: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament in 1642? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Explain: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1642? Analyse: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?

(0)
This card sort look at the key reasons why Henry VIII broke with Rome and includes both a card sort and a thinking skills review triangle activity to help students decide which was the most important factor. The first resource entitled Card Sort - Henry VIII''s problems includes four headings under which the students can sort the rest of the cards. These are power, religion, money and personal. The rest of the resource then includes 14 cards which can be matched to the headings. Once the cards have been sorted, the students should then be able to move onto the review triangle activity. This is best done in pairs or groups, with one person from each group feeding back their results onto the IWB and explaining their choice. The results from the review triangle and the card sort can then be used, along with any of your other classroom resources, as a basis for students writing an essay or extended piece of writing on this topic. The aims and objectives are as follows: Theme: Why did Henry Break with Rome? Know: What were the key reasons for his decision? Understand: What roles did power, religion, money and personal problems play in his decision? Evaluate: Which was the most important factor? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: what were the main reasons' for Henry's decision to break with Rome? Explain: What roles did religion, money, power and personal issues play in his decision? Analyse: Which was the most important factor? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roman Roads in Britain
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Roman Roads in Britain

(1)
This popular download has been tried and tested over the years and has has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning on why the Romans built roads in Britain. The activities involve some straight forward question and answers and a consolidation exercise which gets students to map out and label the Roman Roads in Britain. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint. Both include matching pictures, diagrams, historical sources, task and activities. However, the Powerpoint also includes aims, objectives, outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Know: Why did the Romans build roads in Britain? Understand: How the Romans constructed their roads? Evaluate: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Identify: The different reasons why the Romans build roads in Britain? Can You Describe: How the Romans constructed their roads? Can You Explain: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Once you have successfully completed these activities, why not check out my problem solving and literacy resources on planning a Roman Road? You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the Roman Empire collapse?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Why did the Roman Empire collapse?

(0)
This outstanding lesson has been refined and field tested by experienced teachers. It is designed to help students assess which factors played a crucial role in the collapse of the Roman Empire. This resource is suitable for the full ability range and is a great way of rounding of a course with a fun and engaging activity which can be used as the focus for an assessment or extended piece of writing. The lesson opens with either a snowballing or buzz and go starter. It then sets the scene for the decline of the Empire and looks at the roles played by internal civil wars, climate change, inflation, declining population, the Roman Army and the Barbarian invasions, in it’s final collapse. This is then followed up with a card sort activity and a possible thinking skills review triangle which can then be used by students to help write an extended piece of writing. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document and as well as a thirteen slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions, six heading cards and fourteen statements that can be sorted under them as part of the main activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, information slides, historical sources to support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview that I have uploaded. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: Why factors caused the collapse of the Roman Empire? Understand: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Empire? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Change & Continuity, Source Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The different factors which caused the collapse of the Empire Explain: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Roman Empire? Analyse: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?

(0)
This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students to understand the main reasons why Parliament won the English Civil War. The main activity is a card sort which is followed up by a review triangle to assess which factor was the most important. This is then consolidated with an extended writing exercise. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a 14 slide PowerPoint and a two page Word document which includes 20 statement cards and 6 heading cards labelled ‘Organisation’, ‘Leadership’, ‘Money’, ‘Support’, ‘Tactics’ and ‘Religion.’ The second page includes a double template for a thinking skills review triangle which can be used to help them decide which factor was the most important. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, starters, plenaries, writing frames to help support this lesson. If you are looking for a cheaper version of this lesson then you can purchase the card sort separately for £3.15. Please see the resource review for more information. I have also published a Diamond 9 version of this lesson if you are looking for something a little different. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The English Civil War * Know: Why did Parliament win the English Civil War? * Understand: What different factors helped Parliament to win? * Evaluate: What was the most important reason why Parliament won? * Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? * Can You Describe: Why Parliament won the English Civil War? * Can You Explain: What different factors helped Parliament to win? * Can You Evaluate: The different factors and decide which was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out our TES shop, where you can find similar resources that have been bundled to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Facebook and You Tube for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. However, we do not compromise our values and pay all our contributors the living wage for their work. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort SEN: How did the Industrial Revolution change Britain 1750 - 1850?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort SEN: How did the Industrial Revolution change Britain 1750 - 1850?

(0)
This outstanding card sort has been designed by experienced teachers to help students studying the introduction to the Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1850. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity, but it is primarily designed as a special needs resource. If you are looking for a resource to provide additional stretch and challenge, then why not check out some of my other card sort on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document and an accompanying PowerPoint. The Word document includes aims, instructions and eight picture cards and six heading cards. Once students have cut out the cards and correctly matched the picture cards to both their correct heading and before and after labels, they can extend their understanding further by sorting them into their order of importance before sticking them into their books. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, a snowballing starter, introduction and facilitates the card sort as well as including the correct final version. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1850 Know: How was industry organised before the Industrial Revolution? Understand: What changed as a result of the Industrial Revolution? Evaluate: which changes were the most important? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: industry before and after the Industrial Revolution Explain: What changed as a result of the Industrial Revolution? Analyse: Which changes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy cards / writing frame to argue
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Literacy cards / writing frame to argue

(1)
This literacy resource has been designed to help students to argue in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet / writing frame or cut out as pack of literacy cards that can be kept in an envelope. Please check out my other resources covering other key areas of writing from recount, explain, discuss, debate, persuade, speculate and many more.
Graphic Organisers
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Graphic Organisers

(6)
These graphic organisers can be printed off as worksheets or used on your Interactive Whiteboard for a wide range of subjects and topics to help students analyse sources or compare and contrast ideas.
Oracy - Speaking Starters
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Oracy - Speaking Starters

(3)
This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy