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The History Academy

Average Rating4.75
(based on 212 reviews)

All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.

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All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you have purchased this resource in the past, I have recently uploaded a new PowerPoint to accompany the main worksheet. Both resources include information, historical sources, tasks and activities. However, the PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims of the first lesson are: Know: How Hadrian’s Wall was built and designed? Understand: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Hadrian Wall’s defences? Can You Explain: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Whilst the aims of the much shorter second lesson, which could be set as a homework are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Understand: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Explain: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Can You Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
How to cope with exam stress?
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How to cope with exam stress?

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This great resource has been designed to help students identify what causes stress and how to successfully manage it through a variety of strategies. Strategically it could form an important part of a whole school health and wellbeing drive to support students and could be delivered in bespoke PSE lessons or during form tutor time. When you purchase this resource you be able to download a 32 page PowerPoint which includes a wide range of starters, plenaries and activities to help students fulfil the lesson objectives below: Theme: Health and Wellbeing at school • Know: What are the causes of stress and its effects on your body? • Understand: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Evaluate: Which strategies are the most effective for you? WILF – What Am I Looking For? • Identify & describe: The causes and effects of stress on your body? • Explain: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Analyse: Which strategies are the most effective for you? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?
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Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?

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These outstanding resources look at why people believed in witches in the seventeenth century and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts. They are beautifully designed and differentiated for the full range of ability. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying seventeen slide PowerPoint which includes information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words, a buzz and go squares activity or a source analysis of witches selling their souls in return for magical powers. It then moves on to explain why people believed in witches and the social, political and economic reasons for an increase in suspicion and fear which helped to fuel an increase in witch hunting during this period. The lesson looks at how witches were identified and which groups of people were unfairly persecuted and used as a scapegoat for problems at the time. Both resources include a range of different questions and activities which can be printed off and used with your students. The PowerPoint includes further differentiation and support material for students. These tasks and activities include source analysis questions, as well as a thinking skills review activity to extend the more able which could be used in tandem with a heads and tails activity for the less able. The lesson rounds off with an optional extended question. If you like this lesson, then you might be interested in buying the follow up lesson on ‘How Fair Were Witch Trials?’ which can be purchased separately or as a bundled resource. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: Why did people believe in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: Why were certain people persecuted? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why people believed in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Explain: Why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts? Analyse: Why were certain people persecuted? If you like these resources then why not check out my TES shop. Everything that is uploaded to the History Academy has been field tested and carefully refined in the classroom by experienced teachers. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Hitler's Rise To Power
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Hitler's Rise To Power

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These resources are aimed at lower and middle ability students and look simply how Hitler was able to seize power in 1933. However, they so both contain some stretch and challenge activities. The first activity is a card sort matching statements on Hitler’s beliefs to his ideas. The second resource is a worksheet which includes facts, information and sources explaining why Hitler hated the Jews, the link between unemployment and support for the Nazis as well as how he used the Reichstag and Enabling Law to turn Germany into a dictatorship. The worksheet is published in font size 14 for SEN students and written in a very straight forward prose. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Nazi Germany Know: What did Hitler and the Nazi Party believe? Understand: Why did people support the Nazi Party in 1933? Evaluate: How did Hitler use the Reichstag Fire to get the Enabling Law passed? Skills: Cause, Consequence and Source Analysis WILF: What Aim I looking for? Identify and Describe: What did Hitler and the Nazi Party believe? Explain: Why did the German people support the Nazi Party in 1933? Evaluate: How did Hitler use the Reichstag fire to get the Enabling Law passed? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the Roman Empire collapse?
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Why did the Roman Empire collapse?

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This outstanding lesson has been refined and field tested by experienced teachers. It is designed to help students assess which factors played a crucial role in the collapse of the Roman Empire. This resource is suitable for the full ability range and is a great way of rounding of a course with a fun and engaging activity which can be used as the focus for an assessment or extended piece of writing. The lesson opens with either a snowballing or buzz and go starter. It then sets the scene for the decline of the Empire and looks at the roles played by internal civil wars, climate change, inflation, declining population, the Roman Army and the Barbarian invasions, in it’s final collapse. This is then followed up with a card sort activity and a possible thinking skills review triangle which can then be used by students to help write an extended piece of writing. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document and as well as a thirteen slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions, six heading cards and fourteen statements that can be sorted under them as part of the main activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, information slides, historical sources to support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview that I have uploaded. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: Why factors caused the collapse of the Roman Empire? Understand: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Empire? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Change & Continuity, Source Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The different factors which caused the collapse of the Empire Explain: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Roman Empire? Analyse: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Moral Dilemmas: Who should receive the Kidney Transplant?
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Moral Dilemmas: Who should receive the Kidney Transplant?

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What sort of factors do we take into consideration when faced with difficult moral choices? How has our ethical or moral code been influenced? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the ethical challenges faced by doctors when deciding who should be given a kidney transplant. This is a lesson designed to be done in groups or pairs before feeding back to a class discussion on the issue. This is a great lesson with which to kick start your tutor time, RE , Science or philosophy and ethics course off with some great engaging discussions. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable PowerPoint presentation which includes information slides, aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, links to relevant video clips, activities and resources to be photocopied and given out to students. The lesson begins by looking at what is morality and how how ethical codes are formed. You have a choice of starters or activities. The scene is then set for the medical ethical debate on who should receive the kidney transplant. Each group or pair of students should be given a copy of the first table which includes the background information about each patient. They are expected to review this patient information and decide upon their rank order of priority. Their results can then be fed back to the class for discussion. The teacher then has the option of either giving out the second patient update information or displaying it upon the board. Students should then be given another opportunity to review their choices before feeding back to a class discussion and producing an extended piece of writing explaining their final decision. The final slides include a plenary which includes information and video links explaining why organ donation is important in the UK. If you plan to use this elsewhere you might be able to find some similar adverts relevant to your country. I’ve also included a selection of possible homeworks. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: What is morality? Understand: What do we take into consideration before we make moral choices? Evaluate: Who should receive the life saving Kidney Transplant? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What is morality? Explain: What do we take into consideration before we make moral choices? Analyze: Who should receive the life saving Kidney Transplant? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Invaders and Settlers: Roman Britain
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Invaders and Settlers: Roman Britain

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This lesson is designed as an introduction to a KS3 module called ‘Invaders and Settlers AD43 - 1066’ and provides a quick overview of the impact of the Roman invasion of Britain. However, many of the tasks and activities are also suitable for primary students in KS2 . If you are looking from a KS3 perspective, this lesson sets out the broad context of the Roman invasion and in particular focuses on trade and the growth of towns. This theme is returned to in the other modules which can be downloaded either separately or as a bundle on the Saxons and Vikings links to latter lessons at KS3 on medieval towns and industustrialisation 1750 - 1900. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why was England invaded and settled from 40AD to 1066? Know: Who were the Romans, Saxons, Vikings & Normans? Understand: Why did people want to settle or invade Britain? Evaluate: Who were the British? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Who were the Romans, Saxons, Vikings & Normans? Explain: Why did people want to settle or invade Britain? Analyse: Who were the British? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation which includes starters, plenaries and a range of interactive resources and activities. These include a snowballing stater, buzz and go, time line activity with questions, a map exercise on why would people want to invade Britain, a video note taking task around a specially created clip to go with this lesson on You Tube and a Venn diagram activity comparing a Roman soldier with a Celtic warrior. If you wish to know more then please click on the preview. Everything you need to photocopy is include in the PP, the relevant video clip has been hyperlinked and is also included in the preview which accompanies this resource. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
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Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Charles I's Personality Source Analysis
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Charles I's Personality Source Analysis

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If you are looking for something to help your students develop their source analysis skills by studying a range of primary and secondary sources then check out this lesson which aims to get them to study Charles I’s personality and leadership skills. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customised to suit the needs of your own students. I have included a higher and lower ability version of the same worksheet to aid differentiation as well as a PowerPoint presentation to help facilitate the lesson. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a a higher and lower ability version of a two page worksheet. The higher worksheet includes nine carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and with four tasks and activities. Whilst the lower version includes seven primary and secondary sources, but includes three additional questions to provide additional support. The PowerPoint presentation included aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, relevant video clips, historical sources, information to accompany the tasks and activities. This lesson has been designed to help prepare students and set the scene for the short term causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who was King Charles i? •Understand: What can we learn about him from the historical evidence? •Evaluate: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? •Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: The personality and character of Charles I •Explain: What can we learn about Charles I from the historical evidence? •Analyse: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Euthanasia For & Against
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Card Sort: Euthanasia For & Against

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There have recently been a number of controversial cases in the news over the issue of Euthanasia. Can the taking of another human life to stop suffering ever be justified? This outstanding resources has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against voluntary Euthanasia. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organise them into their most persuasive order and then sick into their books before they have a go at the extended writing activity / discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Social, Moral, Spiritual Values Know: What is Euthanasia? Understand: What are the arguments for and against Euthanasia? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which is acceptable to take another life? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - what is Euthanasia? Explain - the arguments for and against Euthanasia? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to take another life? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did women want the vote in 1900?
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Why did women want the vote in 1900?

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These outstanding resources have been designed to help students studying why women in Britain wanted the vote in 1900. They have been designed to suit a range of abilities and include a variety of tasks that can be easily adapted. When you purchase this resource you will receive a PointPoint presentation which includes the aims, objectives, starters, plenaries and activities which drive the lesson. You will also be able to download a worksheet which will work along side the presentation and a card sort on arguments for and against women having the vote. There are a total of eight activities built into this lesson including a snowballing starter of the key words, a collaborative exercise around the sister suffragette video, source questions with support, a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting why both rich and poor women wanted the vote and finally a persuasive speech activity along with a writing frame support and peer and self assessment activity sheets. Please see previews. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Aims and Objectives Know: Why did women want the vote? Understand: Why different social groups wanted the vote for women? Evaluate: Why did the women’s movement split into two groups? What am I looking For? Describe: Why some women wanted the vote? Explain: Why different social groups wanted the vote? Analyse: Begin to form a judgment on why the women’s movement split? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roman Roads in Britain
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Roman Roads in Britain

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This popular download has been tried and tested over the years and has has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning on why the Romans built roads in Britain. The activities involve some straight forward question and answers and a consolidation exercise which gets students to map out and label the Roman Roads in Britain. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint. Both include matching pictures, diagrams, historical sources, task and activities. However, the Powerpoint also includes aims, objectives, outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Know: Why did the Romans build roads in Britain? Understand: How the Romans constructed their roads? Evaluate: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Identify: The different reasons why the Romans build roads in Britain? Can You Describe: How the Romans constructed their roads? Can You Explain: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Once you have successfully completed these activities, why not check out my problem solving and literacy resources on planning a Roman Road? You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Causes of the English Civil War
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Card Sort: Causes of the English Civil War

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This interactive lesson has been designed by experienced teachers to fun and engaging to help students understand and analyse the causes of the English Civil War, through the medium of a card sort. It has been extensively field tested in the classroom with middle and upper ability students aged 11 - 18. We have also included a short PowerPoint with additional tasks and activities so that this activity could be used as the key focus for a lesson. If this resource isn’t suitable for your students, please do check out our other lessons on this topic. When you purchase this lesson, you will be able to download a two page Microsoft Word document which includes a lesson objective, instructions, three heading cards labeled ‘Political’, ‘Economic’ and ‘Religious’ as well as 24 information cards that can be cut out and sorted by your students. I usually give out page one to my middle ability students and give out page two extended my middle and higher ability students. Page two also includes a thinking skills review triangle to help students prioritize which factor was the most important as well as a consolidation extended writing activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries and instructional slides for the activities in the card sort. The aims of this lesson are: Theme: The Causes of the English Civil War Know: Why did the English Civil War break out in 1642? Understand: What were the political, economic and religious causes? Evaluate: Which cause was the most important? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did the English Civil War started in 1642? Explain: What part did political, economic and religious factors play? Analyse: What was the most important cause of the English Civil War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that are important to you! Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Long Term Causes of the French Revolution
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Card Sort: Long Term Causes of the French Revolution

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Teaching the long term causes of the French Revolution with its political, economic, social and intellectual origins, can be quite a hard topic for some students. This fun and engaging activity has been carefully designed to help students assess which factors were the most important through an interactive card sort. It is suitable for the full range of ability and contains a stretch and challenge task for the more able. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document, which includes aims, instructions, two tasks, and sixteen statements to be sorted under the four headings of political, economic, social and intellectual. Once your students have sorted the statements or created a colour key, they can then organise them into their order of importance. Once the statements have been reviewed after a class discussion, they can then be stuck into their books and used as the basis for an extended piece of writing This resource makes a great starter or plenary to completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. For more information, please view the preview. The aims and objectives are: Theme: The French Revolution, 1789 Know: What were the long term causes of the French Revolution? Understand: What roles did political, economic, social and intellectual factors play? Evaluate: Which long term factor was the most important in causing the revolution? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The long term causes of the French Revolution? Explain: What roles did economic, social, political and intellectual play? Analyse: Which long term factor was the most important in causing the revolution? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Was Bonnie Prince Charlie a Hero or a Villain?
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Was Bonnie Prince Charlie a Hero or a Villain?

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This fun and interactive lesson is designed to help students evaluate the personality and character of Bonnie Prince Charlie and his role within the Jacobite Rebellion in 1745. The young, dashing Charles Stuart stands out from the historical record and demands closer examination. To some he is a romantic hero who represented the rebirth of an independent Scotland, whilst to others he was simply the lackey of the French King who was sent over to destabilize Britain, whilst she was at war with France. When you purchase this lesson you will be able to download four documents. The first contains the PowerPoint, which includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, photocopying templates, historical sources, task and activities. The second and third are two information sheets describing what happened during the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 and are aimed at higher and lower ability students. The fourth or final document is a single page Word Document which contains two heading cards and eighteen information cards to be sorted so that students can evaluate whether Bonnie Prince Charlie was a hero or a villain. Please see the preview for more information. There is enough work in these resources for two lessons, which could be then finished off for homework. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Act of Union Know: Who was Bonnie Prince Charlie? Understand: How close did the Jacobite Rebellion in 1745 come to being successful? Evaluate: Was Bonnie Prince Charlie a hero or a villain? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Who was Bonnie Prince Charlie? Can You Explain: How close did the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion come to being successful? Can You Evaluate: Was Bonnie Prince Charlie a hero or a villain? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. If you are looking for a cheaper option then you can purchase stripped down version of this lesson with a similar title but with ‘Card Sort’ inserted. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. However, we do not compromise our values and pay all our contributors the living wage for their work. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roundhead or Cavalier?
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Roundhead or Cavalier?

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This resource has been designed as an SEND resource to help students understand the difference between a Roundhead or Cavalier during the English Civil War 1642 -1660. It can also be used as a homework sheet for other classes When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word document or PDF which includes a hand drawn cartoon showing a Cavalier and Roundhead soldier in 1642. Both soldiers have a speech bubble explaining what they are fighting for. There then follows three activities, which includes drawing or completing a table with statements that summarise their views as well as two questions which seek to consolidate and test students understanding. The aims and objectives are: Theme: English Civil War 1642-1660 •Know: How did people decide which side to choose in 1642? •Understand: What is the difference between a Roundhead and Cavalier? •Evaluate: Why would some people choose not to fight? WILF - What Am I Looking For? • Can You Describe: How people decided which side to choose in 1642? • Can You Explain: What were the differences between a Roundhead or Cavalier? • Can You Evaluate: Why did some people choose not to fight? If you like this resource then why not check out our TES shop, where you can find similar resources that have been bundled to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Facebook and You Tube for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. However, we do not compromise our values and pay all our contributors the living wage for their work. Kind Regards Roy
Germany's Golden Age, 1920s
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Germany's Golden Age, 1920s

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This beautifully designed lesson looks at the cultural changes that took place during Germany’s Golden Age in the 1920s and looks at how they were interpreted by different groups. The information is accessible to a range of abilities and can be used alongside a wide range of main stream text books or used as a stand alone resource. Depending upon the teaching and learning styles in your school, you could deliver the lesson or print off the relevant slides on art, cinema, nightlife, literature and design and get your students to complete their notes in a market place or gather and share activity. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint presentation entitled Germany’s golden age. The first few slides include, aims, objectives, differentiated out comes and two potential starters. The next few slides then set the scene and put the period into its historical context. This includes a beautifully illustrated and animated diagram on the Dawes Plan. This is followed up with information slides with images and relevant video links on cinema, nightlife, literature, art and design in Germany at this time. These could be used as described above as a gather and share exercise. Once complete the next two slides include tasks and information to help students construct a mind map. In order to extend the more able you could always give out text books to provide additional information that they could use for research. The next section of the PowerPoint looks at several different sources on how different groups in Germany reacted to this new explosion of culture and this is then followed up with an AQA GCSE History style questions with an AFL pupil mark scheme for the new syllabus. However, if you use a different exam board the mark schemes are fully editable and could be easily customised to suit your exam board. The Aims & Objectives are: Theme: Weimar Republic 1923 - 1929 Know: What were the key features of Germany’s Golden Age? Understand: What cultural changes took place and why did they happen? Evaluate: How did different people respond to these changes? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key features of Germany’s Golden Age Explain: What cultural changes took place and why did they happen? Analyse: How did different people respond to these changes? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A writing Frame to Argue
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Literacy: A writing Frame to Argue

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This literacy resource has been designed to help students argue by giving them a series of sentence starters. It can be used in a number of different ways. You can print off the sheets and use them as a worksheet or cut them out as cards. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Oracy - Speaking Starters
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Oracy - Speaking Starters

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This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate
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Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate

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This literacy resource has been designed to help students to either discuss or debate in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet or cut out. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy