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The History Academy

Average Rating4.75
(based on 211 reviews)

All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.

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All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.
Life on the Plantation
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Life on the Plantation

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This beautiful crafted lesson has been designed to help students understand the daily challenges facing slaves living on a plantation either in the Carribbean or the southern United States. It is a shocking but engaging lesson that forms part of series on Britain and the Slave Trade . It comes with both a worksheet and a PowerPoint and a wide range of tasks and activities that are suitable for the full ability range. However, I would not recommend teaching this topic to a Year 7 class as it contains some very mature themes. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet as well as a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and differentiated questions on everyday life in the plantation, the treatment of slaves and their punishments. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: What was it like to be sold at auction? Understand: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Evaluate: Why were some slaves treated better than others? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was it like to be sold at auction? Explain: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Analyse: Why were some slaves treated better than others? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the Roman Empire collapse?
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Why did the Roman Empire collapse?

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This outstanding lesson has been refined and field tested by experienced teachers. It is designed to help students assess which factors played a crucial role in the collapse of the Roman Empire. This resource is suitable for the full ability range and is a great way of rounding of a course with a fun and engaging activity which can be used as the focus for an assessment or extended piece of writing. The lesson opens with either a snowballing or buzz and go starter. It then sets the scene for the decline of the Empire and looks at the roles played by internal civil wars, climate change, inflation, declining population, the Roman Army and the Barbarian invasions, in it’s final collapse. This is then followed up with a card sort activity and a possible thinking skills review triangle which can then be used by students to help write an extended piece of writing. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document and as well as a thirteen slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions, six heading cards and fourteen statements that can be sorted under them as part of the main activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, information slides, historical sources to support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview that I have uploaded. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: Why factors caused the collapse of the Roman Empire? Understand: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Empire? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Change & Continuity, Source Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The different factors which caused the collapse of the Empire Explain: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Roman Empire? Analyse: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
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Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Ethics Card Sort: Media Censorship?
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Ethics Card Sort: Media Censorship?

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Should freedom of information and speech be limited to protect public morality by governments or social media platforms? Should children be shielded from violence and sexually explicit material? Should the rich and famous be protected by privacy laws? Should the government stop terrorist groups using social media to recruit and spread their ideology? This great little card sort has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against the use of censorship. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity or add additional ideas from the class discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this activity are: Theme: Moral philosophy and ethics Know: What is censorship of the media? Understand: What are the arguments for and against censorship of the media? Evaluate: How far should media be censored in a democratic society? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is censorship of the media? Explain - the arguments for and against censorship of the media? Analyze -How far should media be censored in a democratic society? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Home Front: The Blitz
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The Home Front: The Blitz

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This outstanding lesson is designed to help students understand why Hitler launched the Blitz on Britain, the impact it had on civilians, whilst evaluating how close it came to breaking morale. In forms part of a series of lessons on the Home Front that can be downloaded separately or bought as part of a discounted bundle. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet with the key information, sources and tasks, one of which includes writing a report evaluating the impact of the Blitz on London. You will also be able to download an accompanying PowerPoint, which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and tasks as well as starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, graphic organisers, video clips and home work tasks. The PowerPoint also includes a living graph / continuum which can be used to evaluate the sources and how far the Blitz was successful at damaging morale. If you stop the show mode, you should be able to drag and drop the sources onto the continuum. For additional information, please view the preview files: The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did Hitler launch the Blitz against Britain? Understand: What impact did the Blitz have on civilians? Evaluate: How successfully did the government prepare Britain for war? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Hitler launch the Blitz? Explain: What impact did the Blitz have on civilians? Analyse: How successfully did the government prepare Britain for war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you have purchased this resource in the past, I have recently uploaded a new PowerPoint to accompany the main worksheet. Both resources include information, historical sources, tasks and activities. However, the PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims of the first lesson are: Know: How Hadrian’s Wall was built and designed? Understand: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Hadrian Wall’s defences? Can You Explain: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Whilst the aims of the much shorter second lesson, which could be set as a homework are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Understand: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Explain: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Can You Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the USA drop the atomic bomb on Japan?
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Why did the USA drop the atomic bomb on Japan?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students looking in depth at the historical controversy over President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan in 1945. At the time the USA claimed that the decision to drop the bomb on Japan was based on military factors. This resources presents students with the primary, secondary and key information to compare this interpretation with three others including to scare the USSR, test the weapon, revenge for Pear Harbor and come to a balanced independent conclusion. The resources and text level would suit a middle to upper ability group and could be used as a class or extended homework based resource. There is enough work and activity to last between 3/4 lessons for a middle ability class. This is a depth study which allows students to weigh up the evidence, compare sources and come to a reasoned assessment which form the basis for an essay. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a beautifully illustrated twenty six slide Microsoft PowerPoint presentation and a 6 page Microsoft Word document with thirteen primary and secondary sources, a source summary sheet and an enquiry question. The PowerPoint includes information slides, video clip links, pictures, seven activities, starters, plenaries, primary and secondary sources covering all the different interpretations. For further informations, please refer to the preview panel where I have uploaded all the slides for you to view. The aims and objectives of this depth study are: Theme: Why did the USA drop two atomic bombs on Japan in 1945? Know: Why did Japan surrender in August 1945? Understand: What role did the atomic bomb play in Japan’s defeat? Evaluate: Why did President Truman decide to use the atomic bomb? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: At least two possible reasons why the Americans decided to drop the bomb in 1945. Explain: Why historians disagree with the official explanation given by President Truman in 1945. Analyse: Come to a balanced conclusion on why Truman dropped the bomb. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Life in the Trenches
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Life in the Trenches

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This is great lesson get your students talking for weeks and doing extra homework projects. This beautifully illustrated resource is designed to help students assess what life in the trenches was like for soldiers in the First World War as well as what the greatest daily dangers or challenges. As you can see from the preview slides, the tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability. This resource is designed to be a standalone lesson, but it can be also used alongside any mainstream text book on this topic. I usually project the slides, tasks and activities on the board, but some of activities can also be printed off and placed around the tables in the classroom. The resource is full editable so you can easily sequence the lesson to suit your students and the context of your school. I usually supplement this resource with relevant clips from Your Tube from films like ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’, ‘War Horse’ and ‘Gallipoli.’ When you purchase this resource you will receive a twenty three slide PowerPoint which includes an optional ‘snowballing’ or a ‘buzz and go starter’. The next section of the PP then includes information slides and activities on life in the trenches including sleeping accommodation, food, mud, trench foot, health and hygiene, body lice, enemy action, shell shock. These are then followed up by a series of consolidation exercises culminating in a thinking skills review triangle. I have also included relevant questions and addition slides with useful templates to use alongside this resource. For more information, please see the preview sample. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: The First World War Know: What was everyday life like for the soldiers in the trenches? Understand: How did they overcome their daily problems? Evaluate: How reliable are the official images of life in the trenches? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How did soldiers cope with everyday life in the trenches? Explain: How did the overcome their daily problems? Analyse: How reliable are the official images of like in the trenches? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on the First World War in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?
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Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students to understand the main reasons why Parliament won the English Civil War. The main activity is a card sort which is followed up by a review triangle to assess which factor was the most important. This is then consolidated with an extended writing exercise. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a 14 slide PowerPoint and a two page Word document which includes 20 statement cards and 6 heading cards labelled ‘Organisation’, ‘Leadership’, ‘Money’, ‘Support’, ‘Tactics’ and ‘Religion.’ The second page includes a double template for a thinking skills review triangle which can be used to help them decide which factor was the most important. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, starters, plenaries, writing frames to help support this lesson. If you are looking for a cheaper version of this lesson then you can purchase the card sort separately for £3.15. Please see the resource review for more information. I have also published a Diamond 9 version of this lesson if you are looking for something a little different. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The English Civil War * Know: Why did Parliament win the English Civil War? * Understand: What different factors helped Parliament to win? * Evaluate: What was the most important reason why Parliament won? * Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? * Can You Describe: Why Parliament won the English Civil War? * Can You Explain: What different factors helped Parliament to win? * Can You Evaluate: The different factors and decide which was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out our TES shop, where you can find similar resources that have been bundled to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Facebook and You Tube for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. However, we do not compromise our values and pay all our contributors the living wage for their work. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Trade in the Roman Empire
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Trade in the Roman Empire

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This great resource looks at why trade flourished in the Roman Empire and led to the growth of towns. It looks at issues such as law and order and ‘Pax Romana.’ The tasks and activities include a missing word activity for the less able, a series of questions and a group work activity which gets students to identify from the map that I have included, where different items came from in the Empire. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a worksheet as well as PowerPoint with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks, activities, starters and plenaries. The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Growth of the Empire Know: How the Romans traded goods within their Empire? Understand: Why the Roman Empire was good for trade? Evaluate: How important was ‘Pax Romana’ was at encouraging trade? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You describe: How the Romans traded goods within their Empire? Can You Explain: Why the Roman Empire was good for trade? Can You Evaluate: How important was ‘Pax Romana’ was at encouraging trade? This resource works really well along side my other resources on the Roman Army and roads that I have also uploaded. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roman Roads in Britain
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Roman Roads in Britain

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This popular download has been tried and tested over the years and has has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning on why the Romans built roads in Britain. The activities involve some straight forward question and answers and a consolidation exercise which gets students to map out and label the Roman Roads in Britain. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint. Both include matching pictures, diagrams, historical sources, task and activities. However, the Powerpoint also includes aims, objectives, outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Know: Why did the Romans build roads in Britain? Understand: How the Romans constructed their roads? Evaluate: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Identify: The different reasons why the Romans build roads in Britain? Can You Describe: How the Romans constructed their roads? Can You Explain: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Once you have successfully completed these activities, why not check out my problem solving and literacy resources on planning a Roman Road? You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Canals 1750 - 1900
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Canals 1750 - 1900

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This outstanding resource has been designed to put some of the fun back in to the teaching of the industrial revolution by looking at why and how canals were built from 1750 - 1900. The PowerPoint has seven activities built into the presentation. It also includes links to three excellent videos to showcase an aqueduct, how lock gates work and how Navvies built canals. The activities are as follows: Snowballing starter of the key words, three numeracy activities, a review triangle of why businessmen built canals, a heads and tails activity on how engineers built canals and a source annotation exercise of a navvy. The numeracy exercises are easy. You don't need to use calculators but you could allow your students to use their phones / IPads if they have them. There are also three outstanding video clips. Make sure you click on the hyperlinks whilst the show is running. Your students will love this resource, especially the boys. Treat yourself to a break. Download this resource and give yourself more time to spend with your family, whilst being confident in the knowledge that you will being delivering a 'good' to 'outstanding' lesson with your students that they will love and find interesting. This resource can also be uploaded to your school VLE and used as a independent resource for homework. The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution Know: Why were canals built during the Industrial Revolution? Understand: How did canal engineers overcome the problems of building a man made waterway without a current? Evaluate: What impact did canals have on the cost of moving goods? Skills: Numeracy, Cause & Consequence. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why and how were canals built? Explain: Why canals were built and how engineers overcame the shape of the land? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on why Britain underwent a Transport Revolution 1750 – 1900. Have fun and enjoy. Why not check out some of my other resources in my TES shop the History Academy or stay up to date by following me on Twitter or Facebook. Kind Regards Roy
Slave Resistance
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Slave Resistance

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This outstanding lesson on slave resistance looks at the different ways in which Black people challenged slavery. It also tries to answer the difficult question about why some people did not try and run away by contextualising the learning and looking at the experiences of former veterans and prisoners who have struggled to cope with adjusting to an unstructured life of freedom. Unlike other resources on this topic, this lesson also looks at the contrasting experiences of Black people in the USA, Jamaica and Haiti and how they had to adjust the way in which they resisted slavery to suit the problems and different challenges they faced. Finally, this lesson poses the question, how successful was slave resistance and links it’s importance to the abolition debate. Did you know that more British soldiers died trying to maintain slavery in the Caribbean, than died fighting to free Europe from Napoleon? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet as well as a twenty four slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and questions that are designed to help students understand the key ideas whist preparing them for an extended question. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional differentiated activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: How did Black people try and resist slavery? Understand: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Evaluate: How successful was slave resistance? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: the different ways in which black people tried to resist? Explain: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Analyse: How successful was Black peoples resistance against slavery? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Christmas Truce, 1914
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The Christmas Truce, 1914

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These outstanding resources on the Christmas Truce in 1914 are a great lesson no matter the time of year, but they make a particularly moving, touching and inspirational end to the long Autumn Term on the meaning of Christmas. I've provided two resources with this lesson. They can be used in any subject across the curriculum. This topic links to History, Music, RE, PSCHE, English, Drama and Music. The first resource is a worksheet with a series of activities aimed to support a wide spectrum of learners. I've built in extension tasks as well as DART strategies for the less able. The PowerPoint is designed to primarily to support the delivery of the worksheet, but includes the aims and objectives, a snowballing starter for pair and share, differentiated questions for different groups, historical sources and diagrams to help illustrate core ideas as well as carefully selected video and music clips. This is one of my favourite lessons and I am confident that it will quickly become yours as well. Treat yourself to good lesson, avoid the painful Christmas videos at the end of term and create a memorable educational moment in time for your students with this truly inspirational story. You will learn: Theme: What is the meaning of Christmas? Know: What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Understand: Why did the British and German troops hold an unofficial truce? Evaluate: Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Analysis, Evaluation and Judgement. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify = What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Describe = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Explain = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Analyse= Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? The best documentary to watch on this - rather than a Christmas video is: Days that shook the World – The Christmas Truce. See your history department for a copy. If they are worth their salt they will have a copy! I am offering these resources at a knock down price - for a cup of coffee. I was recently made redundant by a multi-academy trust because I was the union rep. If you like my resources then check out the rest on my TES shop or if you fancy a chat about any of my resources or simply want to be kept updated, then you can follow the The History Academy on Twitter, Facebook or You Tube. Anyway, have fun and whatever time of year it is - Peace and Goodwill to all Men and Women. Please help to keep alive the spirit of the Christmas Truce, 1914. Kind Regards Roy https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/
Cards Sort: Ethics - Lying
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Cards Sort: Ethics - Lying

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Can lying ever be morally justified? On the one side of the debate we have those who say that under no circumstances can lying ever be justified, whilst on the other side of the debate we have those argue that lying is okay to prevent harm. So for example, was St Peter right to lie about knowing Jesus after he was arrested? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the main arguments for and against lying. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. This lesson is designed to be used in a Moral Philosophy lesson but it is a great tool for tutor time or helping students who need pastoral guidance. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two heads and then sick into their books before they have a go at the extended writing activity / discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as eighteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: Why is it wrong to lie? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lying? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which it s acceptable to lie? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - Why is it wrong to lie? Explain - the arguments for and against lying? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to lie? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Life on a Slave Plantation
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Life on a Slave Plantation

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students understand the daily challenges facing slaves living on a plantation either in the Carribbean or the southern United States. It is a shocking but engaging lesson that forms part of series on the history of slavery . It comes with both a worksheet and a PowerPoint and a wide range of tasks and activities that are suitable for the full ability range. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet as well as a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and differentiated questions on everyday life in the plantation, the treatment of slaves and their punishments. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Rights and Freedoms Know: What was it like to be sold at auction? Understand: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Evaluate: Why were some slaves treated better than others? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was it like to be sold at auction? Explain: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Analyze: Why were some slaves treated better than others? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the Normans build castles?
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Why did the Normans build castles?

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These beautifully illustrated resources are designed to help students understand why the Normans built castles after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. This lesson could be used as an introduction into a unit of work on medieval castles or to provide a quick overview as part of the theme on how did William keep control. If you are interested in delving deeper into this topic, then this lesson can be purchased as bundled discount along with lessons on medieval castles from my TES shop. When you purchase these resources you will be able to download a worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint. The worksheet includes two pages of sources and information and a third activities page with two different options of tasks for low or higher ability students. The fourteen slide PowerPoint includes a ‘snowballing’ and a ‘buzz and go starter’ as well information slides, historical sources, pictures, diagrams, tasks and activities to support the lesson. The PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, templates and a plenary. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: How did William keep control? Know: Why did the Normans build castles? Understand: How did castles help the Normans control the land they ruled? Evaluate: What was the most important reason why the Normans built castles? Skills: Cause and Consequence, Source Analysis and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify and Describe: Why did the Normans build castles? Explain: How did castles help the Normans control the land they ruled? Analyse: What was the most important reason why the Normans built castles? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on the First World War in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Graphic Organisers
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Graphic Organisers

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These graphic organisers can be printed off as worksheets or used on your Interactive Whiteboard for a wide range of subjects and topics to help students analyse sources or compare and contrast ideas.
Humanities Literacy Mat
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Humanities Literacy Mat

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This literacy mat can be printed off back to back in A3 colour and laminated to use with your students in lesson to help them structure their work using the correct sentence starters and connectives. The literacy mat also includes guidance on spelling, punctuation, structuring paragraphs using PEE and PEEL as well as the correct then, their and they're. This is a must have resource for any humanities teacher.
Oracy - Speaking Starters
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Oracy - Speaking Starters

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This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy