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The History Academy

Average Rating4.81
(based on 208 reviews)

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. I have personally spent over 30 years in the classroom and published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create your own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. I have personally spent over 30 years in the classroom and published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create your own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Moral Dilemmas: Who should receive the Kidney Transplant?
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Moral Dilemmas: Who should receive the Kidney Transplant?

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What sort of factors do we take into consideration when faced with difficult moral choices? How has our ethical or moral code been influenced? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the ethical challenges faced by doctors when deciding who should be given a kidney transplant. This is a lesson designed to be done in groups or pairs before feeding back to a class discussion on the issue. This is a great lesson with which to kick start your tutor time, RE , Science or philosophy and ethics course off with some great engaging discussions. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable PowerPoint presentation which includes information slides, aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, links to relevant video clips, activities and resources to be photocopied and given out to students. The lesson begins by looking at what is morality and how how ethical codes are formed. You have a choice of starters or activities. The scene is then set for the medical ethical debate on who should receive the kidney transplant. Each group or pair of students should be given a copy of the first table which includes the background information about each patient. They are expected to review this patient information and decide upon their rank order of priority. Their results can then be fed back to the class for discussion. The teacher then has the option of either giving out the second patient update information or displaying it upon the board. Students should then be given another opportunity to review their choices before feeding back to a class discussion and producing an extended piece of writing explaining their final decision. The final slides include a plenary which includes information and video links explaining why organ donation is important in the UK. If you plan to use this elsewhere you might be able to find some similar adverts relevant to your country. I’ve also included a selection of possible homeworks. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: What is morality? Understand: What do we take into consideration before we make moral choices? Evaluate: Who should receive the life saving Kidney Transplant? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What is morality? Explain: What do we take into consideration before we make moral choices? Analyze: Who should receive the life saving Kidney Transplant? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Slave Resistance
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Slave Resistance

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This outstanding lesson on slave resistance looks at the different ways in which Black people challenged slavery. It also tries to answer the difficult question about why some people did not try and run away by contextualising the learning and looking at the experiences of former veterans and prisoners who have struggled to cope with adjusting to an unstructured life of freedom. Unlike other resources on this topic, this lesson also looks at the contrasting experiences of Black people in the USA, Jamaica and Haiti and how they had to adjust the way in which they resisted slavery to suit the problems and different challenges they faced. Finally, this lesson poses the question, how successful was slave resistance and links it’s importance to the abolition debate. Did you know that more British soldiers died trying to maintain slavery in the Caribbean, than died fighting to free Europe from Napoleon? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet as well as a twenty four slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and questions that are designed to help students understand the key ideas whist preparing them for an extended question. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional differentiated activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: How did Black people try and resist slavery? Understand: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Evaluate: How successful was slave resistance? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: the different ways in which black people tried to resist? Explain: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Analyse: How successful was Black peoples resistance against slavery? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you have purchased this resource in the past, I have recently uploaded a new PowerPoint to accompany the main worksheet. Both resources include information, historical sources, tasks and activities. However, the PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims of the first lesson are: Know: How Hadrian’s Wall was built and designed? Understand: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Hadrian Wall’s defences? Can You Explain: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Whilst the aims of the much shorter second lesson, which could be set as a homework are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Understand: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Explain: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Can You Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
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Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage
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Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the ‘Middle Passage’ as part of the transatlantic slave trade. The resource can easily be adapted for display purposes but it is designed to be used as a collaborative source investigation. It can also be used as a market place activity. This beautifully illustrated resource is a must have for anyone teaching this topic. The tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability and have been set up around the market place activity where the key slides in the PP are printed off and either pinned on the classroom walls or set out on the tables so that students move around and fill in their information on the summary sheet. Alternatively, the sources are supplied in a booklet format so that each table can investigate a heading before sharing what they have learnt with other groups and the rest of the class. This is a very proactive lesson designed to get students up, moving around, sharing and working collaboratively. I have provided additional differentiation by ‘ragging’ or grading the difficulty of the sources so that the learners can chose their level of challenge. When you purchase this resource you will receive a 18 slide presentation, which includes a snowballing starter, information slides for the market place activity and a plenary. The sources for the market place activity looks at the treatment of slaves and their conditions onboard the slave ship. I have also included a few links to relevant clips on the internet that have been carefully selected. In addition to the PP you will also be able to download a source booklet, a lesson plan and a source summary sheet. The aims and objectives for these resources are: Theme: The Transatlantic Slave Trade Know: What was the slave trade? Understand: How were slaves treated during the ‘Middle Passage’? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How the slave trade worked from Africa to America Explain: How were the slaves treated during the ‘The Middle Passage’? Analyse: How reliable is the evidence? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Peasant's Revolt
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The Peasant's Revolt

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These beautifully designed resources have been written for the full spectrum of learners who are studying the Peasants Revolt. They cover the causes of the peasants revolt, the revolt itself, the controversy over what happened when Watt Tyler met the King and the aftermath. Ideally, these resources could be used over 2/ 3 lessons with a middle ability Year 7 class. When you purchase this resource, you will receive three PowerPoints and additional supporting worksheets, which have been tweaked for photocopying. These resources include aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides as well as a range of activities including starters and plenaries that can be easily customised for your learners. I have also included, at no extra cost two additional card sorts on the causes and the consequences of the Peasant's Revolt as well as an alternative cartoon strip. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Pilgrim Fathers
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The Pilgrim Fathers

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This outstanding lesson is designed to helped students understand who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in America. It is a classic resource which has never failed to engage my students and has been carefully tweaked over the years to get the best possible outcomes. The resource can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customized to suit the needs of your students. These resource can be purchased at a significantly discounted price as a bundled item with my other resources on James I, Witchcraft and The GunPowder Plot. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a sixteen slide PowerPoint Presentation and a three page worksheet. The PowerPoint includes all the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, historical sources, starters, plenaries, information slides, tasks, video links and activities to work alongside the worksheet. The first page of the worksheet includes primary sources from the period as well as information on both the traditional and revisionist versions on who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in the USA. The second page includes a range of different activities, including a starter and consolidation exercises to suit the full range of ability, whilst the third page includes two flow charts or decision trees that can be printed off, completed by students and stuck into their books to show the two different interpretations or versions of the history of the Pilgrim Fathers. I have also linked in a video that I have posted on You Tube on this topic which can be previewed with this resource. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Understand: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Evaluate: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? •Skills: Source Analysis, Cause and Consequence WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Explain: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Analyse: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Home Front: The Home Guard - Dad's Army
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Home Front: The Home Guard - Dad's Army

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This lesson on the Home Guard forms is part of a series that can be downloaded either separately or part of a discounted bundle on the Home Front. It is designed to helped students understand why the British government set up the Home Guard during the Second World War and the role in played in helped to defend the country from invasion. The lesson material is suitable for the full ability range. When you purchase these resources you will be able to download a three page worksheet with the key information, sources and tasks, one of which includes a thinking skills review activity. In addition, you will also be able to download an accompanying PowerPoint with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks and activities as well as information slides, sources, starters, plenaries and links to relevant video clips. This is designed a full interactive and multimedia lesson. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did Britain set-up the Home Guard? Understand: Why were they nick named ‘Dad’s Army?’ Evaluate: What role did the Home Guard play in helping Britain win the war? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Britain set up the Home Guard? Explain: Why were they nicked named ‘Dad Army?’ Analyse: What role did the Home Guard play in helping Britain win the war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves
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Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves

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This activity has been carefully designed to help students assess understand the differences between constructive and destructive waves and be used along side any main stream textbook or video. Once complete students should be able to attempt a question on ‘compare the characteristics of constructive and destructive waves.’ When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Constructive’ and ‘Destructive’ waves as well as fourteen information cards and two diagrams that be sorted under them. This resource makes a great starter or plenary to be completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up by the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Alternatively, your students could draw a table with the two headings ‘Constructive’ or ‘Destructive’ and copy out the information under them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Coastal Landscapes Know: What is a ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ wave? Understand: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Evaluate: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The main characteristics of ‘constructive’ and ‘destrictive’ waves? Explain: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Analyse: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow us on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Medieval Village
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Medieval Village

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This outstanding and beautifully illustrated lesson has been designed to help students evaluate how fair was Medieval Society. Its key aims is to look at how society was organised, what roles various people played within a Medieval Village and then to use this information to draw a conclusion. This lesson includes a number of activities which can be seen in the detailed preview. They have been designed for middle to low ability students in a secondary or primary school. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint with twenty two slides and a one page Word document which includes the information for the characters in a Medieval Village. The PowerPoint include aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, activities, thinking skills activities, diagrams, maps, pictures, templates and information slides to help facilitate the lesson. The lesson begins with either a buzz and go or a snowballing activity. This is followed by an introductory slide and a series of information slides which look at how a Medieval Village was organised and the roles played by the Villeins, Lord of the Manor, Parish Priest, the Miller, Reeve and the Blacksmith. This is followed up by a heads and tails activity, matching the different roles with their definitions and a thinking skills hierarchy triangle to help students decide the level of their importance within the village. The next problem solving activity get students to use the character cards and a map of a Medieval Village to help them decide where everyone in the village would have lived. This is followed up by an information slide and activity which could be printed off for homework to get students to compare and contrast a Medieval cottage with their own home. The last activity is designed to get students to access how each of the different people would have felt about aspects of life in a Medieval Village. This can be used to help them assess how fair was Medieval Society. This is rounded off by a choice of two plenaries including an exit quiz. The aims and objectives of the lesson are: Theme: How fair was Medieval Society? Know: What are the key features of a Medieval village? Understand: What roles did different people play within the village? Evaluate: How fair was Medieval Society? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key features of a Medieval village Explain: What roles did different people play within the village? Analyse: How fair was Medieval Society? If you like this resource you can also followThe History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roman Roads in Britain
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Roman Roads in Britain

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This popular download has been tried and tested over the years and has has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning on why the Romans built roads in Britain. The activities involve some straight forward question and answers and a consolidation exercise which gets students to map out and label the Roman Roads in Britain. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint. Both include matching pictures, diagrams, historical sources, task and activities. However, the Powerpoint also includes aims, objectives, outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Know: Why did the Romans build roads in Britain? Understand: How the Romans constructed their roads? Evaluate: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Identify: The different reasons why the Romans build roads in Britain? Can You Describe: How the Romans constructed their roads? Can You Explain: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Once you have successfully completed these activities, why not check out my problem solving and literacy resources on planning a Roman Road? You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Elizabethan Poor Law
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The Elizabethan Poor Law

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying how Elizabethan society treated the poor by getting them to look at a number of cases and deciding what should happen next. It has been designed by experienced teachers who have field tested this resource in the classroom, whilst being observed by Ofsted. When you purchase this resource it includes a PowerPoint information, which sets out the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and includes all the information, starters, activities that you will need for this lesson. It also includes a step by step lesson plan and a worksheet, which lists each of the characters problems. Once you have completed the starters and reviewed the information on why the Elizabethan's were worried about poverty, your class will be presented with an avatar who will explain how the Elizabethan Poor Law worked. Simply click on the buttons and the avatar will explain how the Elizabethans decided if someone was deserving or undeserving or whether they should be punished or should receive indoor or outdoor relief? When it comes to the next stage you can either print off copies from the PowerPoint or use the worksheet which contains all the cases. As students review each case they have been given to study, they tick the appropriate boxes on the table that is visible in the preview. Once they have looked at their assigned cases they then feedback to a class discussion. The aims and objectives of this fun and enjoyable lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan Age, 1558 – 1603. Know: What are the causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Understand: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Evaluate: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Explain: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Analyse: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? If you are looking for a fun and enjoyable lesson that will impress any observer, then this lesson ticks all the appropriate boxes and even comes with its own lesson plan. If you want to add an extra bit of sparkle then change the customise some of the locations in the cases. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor?
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How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying how Elizabethan society treated the poor by getting them to look at a number of cases and deciding what should happen next. It has been designed by experienced teachers who have field tested this resource in the classroom, whilst being observed by Ofsted. When you purchase this resource it includes a PowerPoint information, which sets out the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and includes all the information, starters, activities that you will need for this lesson. It also includes a step by step lesson plan and a worksheet, which lists each of the characters problems. Once you have completed the starters and reviewed the information on why the Elizabethan's were worried about poverty, your class will be presented with an avatar who will explain how the Elizabethan Poor Law worked. Simply click on the buttons and the avatar will explain how the Elizabethans decided if someone was deserving or undeserving or whether they should be punished or should receive indoor or outdoor relief? When it comes to the next stage you can either print off copies from the PowerPoint or use the worksheet which contains all the cases. As students review each case they have been given to study, they tick the appropriate boxes on the table that is visible in the preview. Once they have looked at their assigned cases they then feedback to a class discussion. The aims and objectives of this fun and enjoyable lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan Age, 1558 – 1603. Know: What are the causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Understand: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Evaluate: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Explain: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Analyse: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? If you are looking for a fun and enjoyable lesson that will impress any observer, then this lesson ticks all the appropriate boxes and even comes with its own lesson plan. If you want to add an extra bit of sparkle then change the customise some of the locations in the cases. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Love Island: Who should Queen Elizabeth I marry?
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Love Island: Who should Queen Elizabeth I marry?

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This fun and engaging lesson uses the popular TV series ‘Love Island’ theme to help students understand the problems Elizabeth faced whilst trying to pick someone to marry. She had to navigate several difficult questions including religion, money, the succession, international alliances as well as her personal feelings. This lesson is suitable for the full range of ability, but please review the video clips that have been chosen to fit the ‘Love Island’ genre before you show them to your students. These resources makes an excellent end of term lesson or a key focus for the GCSE depth study on Elizabeth I. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty one slide PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, information slides, historical sources, video links to YouTube and tasks and activities. to help drive the lesson. The lesson begins with a snowballing starter before moving on to a review activity based around what Elizabeth I was looking for in a prospective husband. The PowerPoint then looks at the advantages and disadvantages of marriage for Elizabeth I as a way of setting the scene for the love island activity. Students are then introduced to the four main suitors via the love island theme. The following slides then include information and relevant video links from main stream movies to help them complete the summary sheet and form a judgement on the suitablity of each man as a prospective husband in preparation for activity 4. Next, using the ‘Love Island’ genre, students then have to write the script for a video diary for Elizabeth I, explaining who she would prefer to ‘couple up with.’ The following slides and historical sources look at why Elizabeth I decided not to get married in the end and why she cultivated the image of the ‘Virgin Queen.’ The lesson is then finally rounded off with an extended writing activity. For additional information, please refer to the preview information. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan England Know: Why was the issue of the succession and marriage so important? Understand: The arguments for and against Elizabeth getting married Evaluate: Elizabeth’s potential suitors and whether they were suitable. Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why was the issue of succession and marriage important? Explain: The arguments for and against Elizabeth getting married Analyse: Elizabeth’s potential suitors and whether they were suitable.
What were the Short Term causes of the English Civil War?
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What were the Short Term causes of the English Civil War?

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This fun and engaging lesson has been written by experienced teachers to help students understand the short term causes of the English Civil War. The lesson picks up from the end of Charles I’s personal rule and examines in depth the problems that he faced from 1640 - 1642. This lesson has been designed for the full ability range. Where appropriate, key slides have been differentiated for core and foundation students. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a eighteen slide Microsoft PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks, activities, starters, plenaries, information slides, links to video clips and templates to help students summarise their learning. Once students have worked their way through the starter exercises, they are presented with a number of problems that faced Charles I from 1640 - 1642. These include religious, financial, the growth of Parliament and his beliefs in the divine rights. Once students have reviewed Charles I’s problems using either the core or foundation slide, they then complete one of several different tasks that you can choose from to help them categorised and prioritised them. Moving on swiftly, the next part of the lesson looks at a series of extracts which help to set into context Charles I’s decision to storm into Parliament and arrest Pym and his supporters. This followed up by an activity making notes from the film Cromwell describing what happened next. The lesson then finishes off by students evaluating how Charles responded to events in Londonwhy Charles I declared war both the long and short term causes r and deciding who was to blame who was to blame Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Short Term Causes of the English Civil War Know: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Understand: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1641? Evaluate: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament in 1642? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Explain: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1642? Analyse: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis: Elizabeth I's Personality
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Source Analysis: Elizabeth I's Personality

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This outstanding lesson is designed to helped students develop their source analysis skills by studying a range of primary and secondary sources that look at her personality and leadership skills as queen. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customised to suit the needs of your own students. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a three page worksheet and a thirteen slide PowerPoint to accompany it. The worksheet includes thirteen carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and a third sheet with the tasks and activities. I usually print the two source sheets together on a single A3 sheet, but they can just as easily be printed off back to back. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, additional activities, copies of the sources for display and a plenary. I have also provided two different styles of tables to be used with students to record their results. You can chose either one or both if you wish to provide an additional layer of differentiation. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Queen Elizabeth I, 1558 – 1603. Know: Who was Queen Elizabeth I? Understand: What can we learn about her from the historical evidence? Evaluate: How successful was Elizabeth I as a leader? Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The personality and character of Queen Elizabeth I? Explain: What can we learn about Elizabeth I from the historical evidence? Analyse: How successful was Queen Elizabeth I? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Market Place Activity: How far was the Black Death a disaster for Medieval Society?
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Market Place Activity: How far was the Black Death a disaster for Medieval Society?

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This outstanding resource was designed for a lesson observation and comes with its own lesson plan. It is suitable for a range of learners and includes some great ideas and strategies to try out with your students. The information on the consequences of the Black Death for the market place activity have been beautifully presented and linked into the decline of feudalism, the peasants revolt and the Renaissance. The core question for students t investigate is 'how far was the Black Death a disaster for Medieval society?' The resource includes a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as two alternative innovative starters and plenaries. It then includes six information slides about how the symptoms and causes of the Black Death as well as an activity around the effectiveness of Medieval medicine at this time. The next six slides are designed to be either printed off on A3 or A4 to be used for the market place activity. They are grouped together so that each table would have two information sheets. The final slide includes an activity to help students structure an extended answer on: 'How far was the Black Death a disaster for Medieval society?' I have also included a card sort on this topic called 'The Black Death, before and after, which can be used as an alternative plenary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Medieval Society Know: What were the consequences of the Black Death? Understand: How did the Black Death change Medieval society? Evaluate: How far was the Black Death a disaster for Medieval society? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What were the effects of the Black Death? Explain: How did the Black Death change Medieval society? Analyse: How far was the Black Death a disaster for Medieval society? As part of the plenary you could discuss what impact would a similar disease have on jobs, housing and society today in modern Britain. Its important to ask in this lesson, for whom was it a disaster and how much of a disaster. My students concluded, that it was a disaster for the feudal lords who began to lose control over their peasants. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900
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Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

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This great resource has been tried and tested over the past 30 years and has never failed to grab the attention and engage my students. This introductory lesson looks at the causes and consequences of the Transport Revolution in Britain. The worksheet is designed for middle and top set students, whilst the accompanying PowerPoint has a mix of activities to engage the full range of abilities. As with all my activities, they designed to be interactive and promote discussion and develop students thinking skills. They include: A snowballing starter activity of the key words for the lesson Source matching exercise of different transport methods in the 18th Century A self / review activity of the answers Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 400AD to 1700 Heads and tails activity of the causes and consequences of 18th century transport revolution A thinking skills review exercise of which were the most important factors Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 1700 to 1800 The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced Britain’s transport network in 1750? Understand: Why did Britain’s transport network change in the 18th Century? Evaluate: Why were these changes necessary? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing the transport network in 1750? Explain: What pressures were forcing the system to change? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which pressures or causes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate
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Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate

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This literacy resource has been designed to help students to either discuss or debate in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet or cut out. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Humanities Literacy Mat
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Humanities Literacy Mat

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This literacy mat can be printed off back to back in A3 colour and laminated to use with your students in lesson to help them structure their work using the correct sentence starters and connectives. The literacy mat also includes guidance on spelling, punctuation, structuring paragraphs using PEE and PEEL as well as the correct then, their and they're. This is a must have resource for any humanities teacher.