Card sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves

Card sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves

This activity has been carefully designed to help students assess understand the differences between constructive and destructive waves and be used along side any main stream textbook or video. Once complete students should be able to attempt a question on ‘compare the characteristics of constructive and destructive waves.’ When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Constructive’ and ‘Destructive’ waves as well as fourteen information cards and two diagrams that be sorted under them. This resource makes a great starter or plenary to be completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up by the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Alternatively, your students could draw a table with the two headings ‘Constructive’ or ‘Destructive’ and copy out the information under them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Coastal Landscapes Know: What is a ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ wave? Understand: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Evaluate: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The main characteristics of ‘constructive’ and ‘destrictive’ waves? Explain: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Analyse: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow us on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort Source Analysis - Was Robespierre a hero or villain?

Card Sort Source Analysis - Was Robespierre a hero or villain?

This innovative and creative activity has been carefully designed to help students assess the role played by the revolutionary leader Robespierre during the period known as the Reign of Terror in the French Revolution. This activity involves giving students ten primary sources and four secondary sources written by historians and sorting them under the headings of hero or villain. Once this has been complete, students can then have a go at answering the question: How far was Robespierre a hero who saved the revolution or a villain who betrayed his own values to take control of France?’ I would recommend that this resource should be used with either a core or advanced group as there is a lot of reading, which would be too much for a foundation group with low literacy skills. If you are looking for something a little easier, I have made a another simpler card sort which just looks at the facts. This can be bought separately. This resource makes a great starter or plenary to completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Alternatively, your students could draw a table with the two headings ‘hero’ or ‘villain’ and list the sources under them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: The reign of Terror Know: What sort of man was Robespierre? Understand: Why are historical events interpreted in different ways? Evaluate: Was Robespierre a hero who saved the revolution or a villain who betrayed his own values to take control of France? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Which sources support / disagree with Robespierre being a ‘hero’ or ‘villian’? Explain: Why were Robespierre’s actions controversial? Analyse: Was Robespierre a hero who saved the revolution or a villain who betrayed his own values to take control of France? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Charles I's Personality Source Analysis

Charles I's Personality Source Analysis

If you are looking for something to help your students develop their source analysis skills by studying a range of primary and secondary sources then check out this lesson which aims to get them to study Charles I’s personality and leadership skills. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customised to suit the needs of your own students. I have included a higher and lower ability version of the same worksheet to aid differentiation as well as a PowerPoint presentation to help facilitate the lesson. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a a higher and lower ability version of a two page worksheet. The higher worksheet includes nine carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and with four tasks and activities. Whilst the lower version includes seven primary and secondary sources, but includes three additional questions to provide additional support. The PowerPoint presentation included aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, relevant video clips, historical sources, information to accompany the tasks and activities. This lesson has been designed to help prepare students and set the scene for the short term causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who was King Charles i? •Understand: What can we learn about him from the historical evidence? •Evaluate: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? •Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: The personality and character of Charles I •Explain: What can we learn about Charles I from the historical evidence? •Analyse: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Source Investigation - Charles I's Personality

Source Investigation - Charles I's Personality

This resource investigation is designed to help students develop their historical skills by getting them assess how far Charles I’s personality and leadership skills helped to cause the English Civil War. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customized to suit the needs of your own students. I have included a higher and lower ability version of the same worksheet to aid differentiation as well as a PowerPoint presentation to help facilitate the lesson. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a a higher and lower ability version of a two page worksheet. The higher worksheet includes nine carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and with four tasks and activities. Whilst the lower version includes seven primary and secondary sources, but includes three additional questions to provide additional support. The PowerPoint presentation included aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, relevant video clips, historical sources, information to accompany the tasks and activities. This lesson has been designed to help prepare students and set the scene for the short term causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who was King Charles i? •Understand: What can we learn about him from the historical evidence? •Evaluate: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? •Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: The personality and character of Charles I •Explain: What can we learn about Charles I from the historical evidence? •Analyse: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: Does Prison Work?

Card Sort: Does Prison Work?

This thought provocative resource aims to help students assess whether prison sentences work. This is a controversial subject with people from all sides advocating different solutions from longer sentences to rehabilitate prisoners to alternatives stences based in the community. This card sort can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of this difficult topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two headings cards labeled ‘Pros / Adavtanges’ and ‘Cons / Disadvatages’ as well as sixteen information cards to be sorted. At the end of the document there is an extension question designed to help consolidate the lesson. This is a fully editable document which can be customised if necessary to suit your students. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Crime and Punishment Know: How are people supported in prison? Understand: What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Evaluate: Does prison protect society from crime? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - How are people treated in prison? Explain - What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Analyse - Does prison protect society from crime? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: What were the causes and consequences of Détente?

Card Sort: What were the causes and consequences of Détente?

If you are studying the Cold War then this card sort will help your students assess understand some of the key issues surrounding Détente. It can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of the topic. I be used alongside any main stream text book or video clip as a starter, mini plenary or a consolidation exercise. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labeled ‘Causes’ and ‘Consequences’ as well as twelve information cards to be sorted under one of the two headings. At the end of the document, I’ve included an extension question ‘Explain how both sides benefitted from Détente?’ The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: The Cold War Know: What was Détente? Understand: What were the causes and consequences of Détente? Evaluate: How did both sides benefit from Détente? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What was Détente? Explain - What were the causes and consequences of Détente? Analyse - How did both sides benefit from Détente? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort - Why did the Labour Party win the 1945 General Election?

Card Sort - Why did the Labour Party win the 1945 General Election?

This useful resource will help your students assess why the Labour Party won and the Conservatives Party lost the General Election in 1945. The information covered looks at the aims of both parties, their leadership, tactics and policies on social welfare and health care. This card sort can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of this difficult topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two headings cards labeled ‘Why Labour Won’ and ‘Why the Conservatives Lost’ as well as sixteen information cards to be sorted. At the end of the document there is an extension question designed to help consolidate the lesson. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Post War Britain Know: What were the policies and aims of both the Labour and Conservative parties in 1945? Understand: Why did the Conservatives lose under Churchill? Evaluate: Why did the Labour Party win in 1945? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - the leadership, policies and aims of both the Conservative and Labour Parties in 1945. Explain - Why the Conservatives lost the election? Analyse - Why the Labour Party won the election? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: How significant was Winston Churchill's wartime leadership?

Card Sort: How significant was Winston Churchill's wartime leadership?

This innovative card sort is suitable for a wide range of abilities and can easily be adapted to suit any text book or resource on this topic. The main task focuses on the controversial wartime leadership of Winston Churchill who was voted as the greatest Briton who had ever lived by a BBC television series in 2002. The cards that have been created for this activity cover a wide range of relevant topics that have been hotly debated by historians. Throughout the history school curriculum from William the Conquer to present day, history teachers have asked their students what makes a great leader in both peace time and war? Winston Churchill’s leadership is certainly worthwhile investigating and opening up to a class discussion. This resource can be used as a starter, plenary, homework or revision exercise for students studying a range of subjects. The nature of this resource makes it especially appealing to both visual and kinesthetic learners. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page word document with a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labeled ‘Successful’ and ‘Failure’ as well as fourteen information cards that need to be matched to one of the two headings. Once completed students can consolidate their understanding by attempting the extended answer task at the end. Please note that the information cards have been designed to be deliberately controversial to help open up discussion on the topic. Aims and Objectives: Theme: The Second World War •Know: What actions did Churchill take to help lead Britain to victory against Nazi Germany? •Understand: What were the successes and failures of Churchill’s leadership? •Analyse: How significant was Churchill’s wartime leadership in helping Britain win the war? •Skills:Significance WILF - What Am I Looking For? •Identify and Describe: What actions did Churchill take to help lead Britain to victory against Nazi Germany? •Explain: What were the successes and failures of Churchill’s leadership? •Evaluate: How significant was Churchill’s wartime leadership in helping Britain win the war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Source Analysis - Charles I's Personality

Source Analysis - Charles I's Personality

This lesson is designed to helped students develop their source analysis skills by studying a range of primary and secondary sources that look at Charles I’s personality and leadership skills as King of England. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customised to suit the needs of your own students. I have included a higher and lower ability version of the same worksheet to aid differentiation. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a a higher and lower ability version of a two page worksheet. The higher worksheet includes nine carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and with four tasks and activities. Whilst the lower version includes seven primary and secondary sources, but includes three additional questions to provide additional support. If you are interested, I have also produced a PowerPoint to accompany this lesson which can be purchased bundled separately with these sources for an extra £1. This lesson has been designed to help prepare students and set the scene for the short term causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who was King Charles i? •Understand: What can we learn about him from the historical evidence? •Evaluate: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? •Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: The personality and character of Charles I •Explain: What can we learn about Charles I from the historical evidence? •Analyse: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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King Charles I - Portrait of a King

King Charles I - Portrait of a King

This lesson is designed to helped students develop their source analysis skills by studying a range of primary and secondary sources that look at Charles I’s personality and leadership skills as King of England. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customized to suit the needs of your own students. I have included a higher and lower ability version of the same worksheet to aid differentiation. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a a higher and lower ability version of a two page worksheet. The higher worksheet includes nine carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and with four tasks and activities. Whilst the lower version includes seven primary and secondary sources, but includes three additional questions to provide additional support. If you are interested, I have also produced a PowerPoint to accompany this lesson which can be purchased bundled separately with these sources for an extra $1. This lesson has been designed to help prepare students and set the scene for the short term causes of the English Civil War 1642 - 1660. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who was King Charles i? •Understand: What can we learn about him from the historical evidence? •Evaluate: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? •Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: The personality and character of Charles I •Explain: What can we learn about Charles I from the historical evidence? •Analyse: Why was Charles I unpopular with his people? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: Was the Munich Putsch a disaster for the Nazi Party?

Card Sort: Was the Munich Putsch a disaster for the Nazi Party?

If you are studying Hitler’s rise to power then this card sort will help your students assess how far the Munich Putsch in 1923 was a disaster for the Nazi Party. It can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of the topic. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Hitler’s rise to power Know: Why what happened during the Munich Putsch? Understand: Why did the Munich Putsch fail? Evaluate: How far was the Munich Putsch a disaster for the Nazi Party? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What happened during the Munich Putsch? Explain - Why did the Munich Putsch fail? Analyse - How far was the Munich Putsch a disaster for the Nazi Party? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: Munich Putsch - success or failure?

Card Sort: Munich Putsch - success or failure?

If you are studying Hitler’s rise to power then this card sort will help your students assess how far the Munich Putsch in 1923 was a disaster for the Nazi Party. It can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of the topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two headings cards labeled success and failure as well as sixteen information cards to be sorted. At the end of the document there is an extension question designed to help consolidate the lesson. Finally, I have also linked in a video link to a clip from the film, Hitler the Rise of Evil, which could be used as starter to to recap what happened during the Putsch. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Hitler’s rise to power Know: Why what happened during the Munich Putsch? Understand: Why did the Munich Putsch fail? Evaluate: How far was the Munich Putsch a disaster for the Nazi Party? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What happened during the Munich Putsch? Explain - Why did the Munich Putsch fail? Analyse - How far was the Munich Putsch a disaster for the Nazi Party? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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The Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1914

The Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1914

These great engaging resources are designed to help students who are studying the Liberal Reforms in Britain from 1906 to 1914. They have been designed to meet the needs of the full spectrum of learners in a main stream school. For more information about these resources, please click on the resource preview.
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Market Place Activity: What can we learn about British society from the Titanic?

Market Place Activity: What can we learn about British society from the Titanic?

If you are looking for an outstanding lesson which ticks all the boxes on collaborative learning then this beautifully illustrated market place activity on the Titantic is a must have for those teachers looking for something engaging and different to add to their toolkit of great lessons. As you can see from the preview slides, the tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability and have been set up around the market place activity where the key slides in the PP are printed off and either pinned on the classroom walls or set out on the tables so that students move around and fill in their information on the summary sheet. This is a very proactive lesson designed to get students up, moving around, sharing and working collaboratively. I have provided additional differentiation by ‘ragging’ or grading the difficulty of the slides / sources so that the learners can chose their level of challenge. When you purchase this resource you will receive a twenty three slide presentations which includes a snowballing starter, information slides for the market place activity and a plenary. The sources for the market place activity looks at conditions on board the Titantic for the different classes as well as statistics on their survival rates. It is interesting to note that the myth of women and children first, only really applied to the first class passengers. I have also included a few links to relevant clips on the internet that have been carefully selected. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows, but they can be easily tweaked for a number of different investigations on this topic: Know: What was life like on-board for the passengers on the Titanic? Understand: What can historians learn about British society from the Titanic? Evaluate: How fair was British society in 1900? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was life like on-board the Titanic? Explain: What can historians learn about British society from the Titanic? Analyse: How fair was British society in 1900? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Market Place Activity: Textile Industry 1750 - 1900

Market Place Activity: Textile Industry 1750 - 1900

This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying how the Industrial Revolution changed the Textile Industry between 1750 - 1900. It is suitable for a range of learners and includes some great ideas and strategies to try out with your students. The information for the market place activity on the on the new inventions which transformed the textile industry has been beautifully presented and carefully linked to the decline of the domestic system and the birth of factories and mills. The follow up activities look at how the new machines changed the way people worked and looks at some of their negative reactions. The resource includes a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, a snowballing starter and an introduction and activity which gets students to draw links between the population explosion and the increased demand for more textiles. The next five slides, which can be printed off on A4 or A3, contain information on the Flying Shuttle,The Spinning Jenny, The Water Frame, the Mule and the Power Loom. I have also produced a summary table for each table for the students to complete. This could be printed off or copied off the board, depending upon your photocopy budget. I usually get each table to feed back on one invention and then complete a class version on the board, depending upon the ability of the class. The next few slides include a link to a video clip and explain the impact of the new machines on peoples lives. This is followed up two source based questions and a link to the song 'Poverty Knock.' Where appropriate, I have provided differentiated activities. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Know: Why did Britain's Textile Industry change 1750 - 1900? Understand: How did each new invention contribute to the changes? Evaluate: What impact did these new machines have on peoples’ lives? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Why did Britain's textile industry change 1750 - 1900? Explain: How did each new machine contribute to the changes taking place? Analyse: What impact did these new machines have on peoples’ lives? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
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Why were witch trials unfair in 17th Century Britain?

Why were witch trials unfair in 17th Century Britain?

This lesson looks at how fair witch trials were in Britain during the 17th Century. It continues on from my previous lesson on why people why people believed in witches and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts in the 17th century. This lesson focuses also on the methods and tactics that men like Matthew Hopkins used for hunting witches and how James I tried to apply a more ‘rational’ approach. These resources are beautifully designed and differentiated and a must have anyone studying this controversial period of history or wishing to contrast what was happening in the Salem witch trials in the USA. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying eighteen slide PowerPoint which include information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities to help support the worksheet. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words or a video clip summary where students note down the evidence that was used to prove that Blackadder was a witch . It then moves on to explain through a variety of information and sources how people tried to identify witches and finishes off by looking at the trial of Ursula Kemp. You can preview the tasks and activities below. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Citizenship WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Explain: Why did people hunt for witches? Analyse: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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King James I, 1603 - 1625

King James I, 1603 - 1625

These outstanding resources look at key issues during the controversial Reign of James I. They begin by looking at the problems that he faced during his reign and the impact of the break with Rome and include his relations with Parliament, The Divine Rights of Kings, Money, taxation and religious problems. The issue of the religious problems facing James I is explored via both the Gunpowder Plot and The Pilgrim Fathers. Whilst interconnected with both these problems is popular beliefs and superstitions which is explored through my resources on Witchcraft. The overarching theme to all these resources is their link to not just the consequences of the break with Rome but ultimately the causes of the English Civil War. Please click on each resource to find out more.
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How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century?

How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century?

This outstanding lesson looks at how fair witch trials were in the 17th Century. It continues on from my previous lesson on why people why people believed in witches and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts in the 17th century. This lesson focuses also on the methods and tactics that men like Matthew Hopkins used for hunting witches and how James I tried to apply a more ‘rational’ approach. These resources are beautifully designed and differentiated and a must have anyone studying this controversial period of history. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying eighteen slide PowerPoint which include information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities to help support the worksheet. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words or a video clip summary where students note down the evidence that was used to prove that Blackadder was a witch . It then moves on to explain through a variety of information and sources how people tried to identify witches and finishes off by looking at the trial of Ursula Kemp. You can preview the tasks and activities below. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Citizenship WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What evidence was used to convict a witch in the 17th Century? Explain: Why did people hunt for witches? Analyse: How fair were witch trials in the 17th Century? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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PEE Card Sort: Why did the Germans vote for the Nazis in the 1930s?

PEE Card Sort: Why did the Germans vote for the Nazis in the 1930s?

This outstanding resource has been designed for students studying the rise of Hitler and the increasing popularity of the Nazi Party in Germany’s elections. It can be used as a starter, consolidation exercise, plenary or even a homework activity. This activity is designed to appeal to students of all abilities but is particularly aimed at middle to lower ability students who need help in structuring their arguments using the PEE model - Point - Example - Explain. When you purchase this resource it includes a fully editable one page Microsoft Word document with a learning aim and six points and matching examples and explanations to the question, why did people vote for the Nazis? The topics covered include the Treaty of Versailles, economic depression, hyperinflation, German’s electoral system, increasing unpopularity of the Socialist Party and Nazi propaganda machine. I have also linked in an optional video clip to accompany this resource from YouTube. Depending upon the ability of the class, it should take no more than 20 minutes to do the card sort. Afterwards they could have a go at doing an extended question answering the question: ‘Why did the German people vote for the Nazi Party in the 1930s?’ The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Rise of Hitler Know: Why did people vote for the Nazis? Understand: Why did the popularity of the Nazi Party increase? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Why did people vote for the Nazi Party in the 1930s? Explain: Why did the popularity of the Nazi Party increase? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: What impact did the Renaissance have on medical knowledge?

Card Sort: What impact did the Renaissance have on medical knowledge?

This outstanding card sort is suitable for a wide range of abilities and can easily be adapted to suit any text book or resource on this topic. The main activity focuses on the impact that the Renaissance had on medical knowledge. It can be used as a starter, plenary, homework or revision exercise for students studying GCSE Medicine Through Time. This activity will especially appeal to both visual and kinesthetic learners. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page word document with a learning objective, instruction and eight headings and information cards that need to be matched together. Once complete students can consolidate their understanding by creating a key to show which ideas were based upon rational or superstitious beliefs. This is followed up by two tasks that look at change and continuity from ancient to the Renaissance period. Aims and Objectives: Theme: Medicine Through Time Know: How did peoples understanding of the causes of disease changed over time? Understand: What impact did the Renaissance have on medical knowledge? Analyse: What has changed and what has stayed the same over time? Skills: Change and Continuity WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and Describe: How did peoples understanding of the causes of disease change over time? Explain: What impact did the Renaissance have on medical knowledge? Evaluate: What has changed and what has stayed the same over time? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?

Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?

These outstanding resources looks at why people believed in witches in the seventeenth century and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts? They are beautifully designed and differentiated for the full range of ability range. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying seventeen slide PowerPoint which include information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words, a buzz and go squares activity or a source analysis of witches selling their souls in return for magical powers. It then moves on to explain why peopled believed in witches and the social, political and economic reasons for an increase in suspicion and fear which helped to fuel am increase in witch hunts during this period. The lesson looks at how witches were identified and which groups of people were unfairly persecuted and used a scapegoat for problems at the time. Both resources include a range of different questions and activities which can be printed off and used with your students. The PowerPoint includes further differentiation and support for students. These tasks and activities source analysis questions as well as a thinking skills review activity to extend the more able which could be used in tandem with a heads and tails activity for the less able. The lesson rounds off with an optional extended question. If you like this lesson then you might be interested in buying the follow up lesson on how fair were which trials which can be purchased separately or as a bundled resource: The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: Why did people believe in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: Why were certain people persecuted? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why people believed in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Explain: Why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts? Analyse: Why were certain people persecuted? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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