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The History Academy

Average Rating4.64
(based on 224 reviews)

All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 33 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.

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All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 33 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.
Slave Resistance
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Slave Resistance

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This outstanding lesson on slave resistance looks at the different ways in which Black people challenged slavery. It also tries to answer the difficult question about why some people did not try and run away by contextualising the learning and looking at the experiences of former veterans and prisoners who have struggled to cope with adjusting to an unstructured life of freedom. Unlike other resources on this topic, this lesson also looks at the contrasting experiences of Black people in the USA, Jamaica and Haiti and how they had to adjust the way in which they resisted slavery to suit the problems and different challenges they faced. Finally, this lesson poses the question, how successful was slave resistance and links it’s importance to the abolition debate. Did you know that more British soldiers died trying to maintain slavery in the Caribbean, than died fighting to free Europe from Napoleon? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet as well as a twenty four slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and questions that are designed to help students understand the key ideas whist preparing them for an extended question. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional differentiated activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: How did Black people try and resist slavery? Understand: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Evaluate: How successful was slave resistance? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: the different ways in which black people tried to resist? Explain: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Analyse: How successful was Black peoples resistance against slavery? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
How to cope with exam stress?
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How to cope with exam stress?

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This great resource has been designed to help students identify what causes stress and how to successfully manage it through a variety of strategies. Strategically it could form an important part of a whole school health and wellbeing drive to support students and could be delivered in bespoke PSE lessons or during form tutor time. When you purchase this resource you be able to download a 32 page PowerPoint which includes a wide range of starters, plenaries and activities to help students fulfil the lesson objectives below: Theme: Health and Wellbeing at school • Know: What are the causes of stress and its effects on your body? • Understand: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Evaluate: Which strategies are the most effective for you? WILF – What Am I Looking For? • Identify & describe: The causes and effects of stress on your body? • Explain: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Analyse: Which strategies are the most effective for you? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Battle of Britain, 1940
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The Battle of Britain, 1940

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This outstanding lesson on why the RAF won the Battle of Britain, was amongst one of our most popular downloads we had schoollhistory.co.uk and has been tried, tested and fine tuned over many years. This newer version has been fully updated with a wider range of tasks and activities to suit the modern classroom, but if you would still like to use the classic version, then I have also included it as a PDF file. These resources are suitable for the full ability range and include a wide range of differentiated activities. When you purchases these resources you will be able to download an eighteen slide PowerPoint to accompany the lesson and two different versions of a four page page worksheet. I have also included a numeracy activity that can be used in lesson or set as homework. The PowerPoint is designed to be used as a standalone resource or if you prefer to accompany the worksheet and contains the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, pictures diagrams, information and links to video clips, that you will need to teach the lesson. With the exception of the classic version, all the worksheets have been supplied in Microsoft Word. The lesson begins by looking at the military situation in 1940 and gets students to analyse why Germany decided to invade and the challenges that they would face trying to cross the English Channel. This is followed up by another activity which gets students to listen to Churchill’s famous ‘we will fight them on the beaches’ speech and to assess why it was made in Parliament and broadcast to the nation. The rest of lesson and activities focus on what happened and why the RAF won. For more information, please refer to the preview slides. The aims and objectives of the lesson are: Theme: The Second World War Know: Why did Germany try and invade Britain during the summer of 1940? Understand: Why did the RAF win the Battle of Britain? Evaluate: How important was the role of technology in the German defeat? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why Germany tried to invade Britain in 1940? Explain: Why the RAF won the Battle of Britain? Analyse: How important was the role of technology in the German defeat? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. It has also been bundled up along with my lessons on Blitzkrieg and Dunkirk. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal.
Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?
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Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. The women’s movement was split between the peaceful suffragists on the one hand, who made up nearly 80% of women, whilst on the other there were the better known militant suffragettes. The lesson resources have been designed to suit the full spectrum of ability at KS3 and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. However, I have also included a PowerPoint to accompany the lesson which includes all the necessary background knowledge for the lesson. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document an an accompanying PowerPoint presentation. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Suffragette’ and ‘Suffragist’, along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. Whilst the PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, links to appropriate video clips and additional tasks, including an alternative Venn diagram activity comparing the two groups of campaigners. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. All our authors are paid the living wage for their work so when you purchase our resources you are buying into our shared values of fair play and decency. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates or if you have any questions or requests. Do check out our YouTube Channel: @historyacademy Kind Regards Roy
Causes of the Miners' Strike 1984 - 1985
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Causes of the Miners' Strike 1984 - 1985

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This lesson fun and interactive lesson is the first in a series on the Miners Strike 1984 - 1985. This lesson is aimed at KS4 students, but could also be used with KS5 to look at the causes of the Miners’ Strike. We have specifically adapted these resources for KS3 and uploaded them separately and bundled them up on the TES. The topics looked at in this lesson include economic restructiring (changes), government policies including privatisation, NUM opposition to pit closures, ‘The Winter of Discontent’, political climate in the 1980s and media bias. The lesson includes a range of different questions, templates and differentiated tasks which build up to an essay questionon what caused the Miners Strike 1984 - 1985. This is an interactive lesson, but we have also uploaded a market place versions which we have uploaded separately and bundled together on the TES. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a 27 slide PowerPoint Presentation which includes aims, objectives, starters, plenaries, tasks, activities, templates, video links, information slides, a word search as well as historical sources. In addition, you will also be able to download a 4 page worksheet in Word to accompany the lesson. We have also uploaded both resources as PDFs just in case you do not have access to Microsoft Office. Please see the detailed preview for more information. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Miners’ Strike 1984 - 85 Know: Why the Conservative Party wanted to reorganise the coal industry? Understand: How Britain was divided politically and socially in the 1980s? Evaluate: What were the causes of the Miners’ Strike? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Why the Conservative Party wanted to defeat the NUM? Can You Explain: How Britain was divided politically and socially in the 80s? Can You Evaluate: What were the causes of the Miners’ Strike? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. All our authors are paid the living wage so when you purchase our resources you are buying into our shared values of fair play and decency. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Don’t forget to check out our dedicated You Tube Channel with over 600 free videos: @historyacademy Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Should the Benin Bronzes be returned?
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Card Sort: Should the Benin Bronzes be returned?

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The History Academy has commissioned this resource on the Benin Bronzes as part of our attempt to try and fill the curriculum gap on African history. For far too long the history of Africa has been neglected and relegated. Its time to address this and restore African history to its rightful place alongside other civilisations. The debate over whether the Benin Bronzes should be returned to Nigeria has divided opinion across the World. Unlike the Elgin Marbles, there can be no doubt that the Benin Bronzes they were stolen by the British Army in 1897. However, returning them is no simple matter for a combination of factors which have been summarised in this fun and interactive card sort exercise. When you purchase this lesson, you will be able to download a single page Word document which contains, a learning objective, instructions two heading cards and sixteen information cards that can be sorted under them. You will also be able to download a sixteen slide PowerPoint which has been designed to facilitate the main activity and provide an optional follow up persuasive speech writing task. It contains aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, templates, links to video clips, tasks and activities. Please see the preview for more information. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: British Empire and the heritage industry Know: Why are the Benin Bronzes in a British Museum? Understand: The arguments for and against returning them? Evaluate: Should the Benin Bronzes be returned? Skills: Compare & Contrast, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Why are the Benin Bronzes in a British Museum? Can You Explain: The key arguments for and against returning the Benin Bronzes? Can You Evaluate: Whether they should be returned and justify your opinion? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. All our authors are paid the living wage so when you purchase our resources you are buying into our shared values of fair play and decency. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Agricultural Revolution 1750 - 1850
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Agricultural Revolution 1750 - 1850

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If you are looking for a great lesson that is suitable for students of all abilities on the Agricultural Revolution 1750 - 1850, then you have found it! This beautifully illustrated lesson looks at the problems facing farmers in 1750 and the solutions that they had found by 1850. It also aims to get students to assess who were the winners and loses and introduces some of the themes that you may want to follow up later on protest and population movement. When you purchase this lesson, you will be able to download a 21 slide PowerPoint Presentation that contains aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, activities, SEND tasks, historical sources, starters and plenaries on the Agricultural Revolution 1750 - 1850. The PowerPoint also contains useful video links as well as templates for photocopying. Please see the preview for more information, but note that some slides have been missed out. When teaching this lesson, I normally get my students to review the problems facing the farmers in slide 6. We then have a go at trying to prioritise them into a thinking skills review triangle to help assess their importance. Depending upon the ability of the class, we then complete ‘Activity 5’ either after we have reviewed the solution slides or as we are going along. We then consolidate our learning using the heads and tails activity and / or using the two plenary exercises that I have provide for you to choose from. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1850 Know: What problems faced farmers in 1750? Understand: What changes took place during the Agricultural Revolution? Evaluate: How successfully had farmers solved their problems by 1850? Skills: Cause & Consequence, Continuity & Change WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What problems faced farmers in 1750? Can You Explain: What changes took place during the Agricultural Revolution? Can You Evaluate: How successfully had farmers solved their problems by 1850? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. If you are looking for a market place activity on this topic, then please check out my TES shop and search for Agricultural Revolution. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. However, we do not compromise our values and we pay all our contributors the living wage for their work. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Causes of the English Civil War Card Sort
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Causes of the English Civil War Card Sort

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This fun and engaging lesson has been designed by experienced teachers to help students understand and analyze the causes of the English Civil War, through the medium of a card sort. It has been extensively field tested in the classroom with middle and upper ability students aged 11 - 18. We have also included a short PowerPoint with additional tasks and activities so that this activity could be used as the key focus for a lesson. If this resource isn’t suitable for your students, please do check out our other lesson on this topic. When you purchase this lesson, you will be able to download a two page Microsoft Word document which includes a lesson objective, instructions, three heading cards labeled ‘Political’, ‘Economic’ and ‘Religious’ as well as 24 information cards that can be cut out and sorted by your students. I usually give out page one to my middle ability students and give out page two extended my middle and higher ability students. Page two also includes a thinking skills review triangle to help students prioritize which factor was the most important as well as a consolidation extended writing activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries and instructional slides for the activities in the card sort. The aims of this lesson are: Theme: The Causes of the English Civil War Know: Why did the English Civil War break out in 1642? Understand: What were the political, economic and religious causes? Evaluate: Which cause was the most important? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did the English Civil War started in 1642? Explain: What part did political, economic and religious factors play? Analyze: What was the most important cause of the English Civil War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Trade in the Roman Empire
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Trade in the Roman Empire

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This great resource looks at why trade flourished in the Roman Empire and led to the growth of towns. It looks at issues such as law and order and ‘Pax Romana.’ The tasks and activities include a missing word activity for the less able, a series of questions and a group work activity which gets students to identify from the map that I have included, where different items came from in the Empire. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a worksheet as well as PowerPoint with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks, activities, starters and plenaries. The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Growth of the Empire Know: How the Romans traded goods within their Empire? Understand: Why the Roman Empire was good for trade? Evaluate: How important was ‘Pax Romana’ was at encouraging trade? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You describe: How the Romans traded goods within their Empire? Can You Explain: Why the Roman Empire was good for trade? Can You Evaluate: How important was ‘Pax Romana’ was at encouraging trade? This resource works really well along side my other resources on the Roman Army and roads that I have also uploaded. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Christmas Truce, 1914
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The Christmas Truce, 1914

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These outstanding resources on the Christmas Truce in 1914 are a great lesson no matter the time of year, but they make a particularly moving, touching and inspirational end to the long Autumn Term on the meaning of Christmas. I’ve provided two resources with this lesson. They can be used in any subject across the curriculum. This topic links to History, Music, RE, PSCHE, English, Drama and Music. The first resource is a worksheet with a series of activities aimed to support a wide spectrum of learners. I’ve built in extension tasks as well as DART strategies for the less able. The PowerPoint is designed to primarily to support the delivery of the worksheet, but includes the aims and objectives, a snowballing starter for pair and share, differentiated questions for different groups, historical sources and diagrams to help illustrate core ideas as well as carefully selected video and music clips. This is one of my favourite lessons and I am confident that it will quickly become yours as well. Treat yourself to good lesson, avoid the painful Christmas videos at the end of term and create a memorable educational moment in time for your students with this truly inspirational story. Both resources included in this lesson have been uploaded in both Office and PDF format. Theme: The First World War Know: What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Understand: Why did the British and German troops hold an unofficial truce? Evaluate: Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Can You Explain: Why did the British and German troops hold an unofficial truce? Can You Evaluate: Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? If you like this resource then why not check out our other resources on similar topics in our TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. All our authors are paid the living wage so when you purchase our resources you are buying into our shared values of fair play and decency. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
KS2 Card Sort: Dick Turpin - Hero or Villain?
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KS2 Card Sort: Dick Turpin - Hero or Villain?

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This fun and interactive card sort has been designed a starter or plenary to a lesson on the highwayman Dick Turpin for KS2 or a special needs class at KS3. Students are given a series of statements about his actions and how people have reacted to them and are instructed to sort them under the headings of hero or villain. This lesson is suitable for either a KS3 or KS4 history or an English lesson. When you purchase this lesson you will be able to download a 10 slide PowerPoint that has been designed to help facilitate the card sort. It contains aims, objectives, a brief introduction, a historical source, link to a video clip, tasks, activities, starters, plenaries and templates. Accompanying the PowerPoint is a single page Word Document file containing a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Dick Turpin was a hero’ and ‘Dick Turpin was a Villain.’ The resource also contains 20 statements to be sorted by students and a second task instructing them to write an extended answer. Both documents have also been uploaded in PDF. The aims and objectives of the lesson are: WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Who was Dick Turpin? Can You Explain: Why he is seen as either a hero or villain? Can You Evaluate: Was Dick Turpin a popular hero or a villain? If you like this resource then why not check out our other resources on similar SMSC topics in our TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. All our authors are paid the living wage so when you purchase our resources you are buying into our shared values of fair play and decency. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Life on a Slave Plantation
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Life on a Slave Plantation

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students understand the daily challenges facing slaves living on a plantation either in the Carribbean or the southern United States. It is a shocking but engaging lesson that forms part of series on the history of slavery . It comes with both a worksheet and a PowerPoint and a wide range of tasks and activities that are suitable for the full ability range. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet as well as a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and differentiated questions on everyday life in the plantation, the treatment of slaves and their punishments. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Rights and Freedoms Know: What was it like to be sold at auction? Understand: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Evaluate: Why were some slaves treated better than others? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was it like to be sold at auction? Explain: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Analyze: Why were some slaves treated better than others? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves
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Card Sort - 'Constructive' Verses 'Destructive' Waves

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This activity has been carefully designed to help students assess understand the differences between constructive and destructive waves and be used along side any main stream textbook or video. Once complete students should be able to attempt a question on ‘compare the characteristics of constructive and destructive waves.’ When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Constructive’ and ‘Destructive’ waves as well as fourteen information cards and two diagrams that be sorted under them. This resource makes a great starter or plenary to be completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up by the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Alternatively, your students could draw a table with the two headings ‘Constructive’ or ‘Destructive’ and copy out the information under them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Coastal Landscapes Know: What is a ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ wave? Understand: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Evaluate: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The main characteristics of ‘constructive’ and ‘destrictive’ waves? Explain: What are the main differences between ‘constructive’ and ‘destructive’ waves? Analyse: Why do ‘contructive’ waves deposit, whilst ‘destructive’ waves erode? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow us on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: How successful were the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911?
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Card Sort: How successful were the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911?

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This excellent resource can be used as a starter, plenary or revision activity for students studying the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911. It is suitable for the full range of ability as it contains both simple and challenging statements to provide both support and stretch and challenge. I have used this resource to teach the Liberal Reforms through both GCSE Modern World History and Medicine Through Time. The resource includes two heading cards and eighteen statement cards about old age pensions, national insurance, labour exchanges, free school meals, the Children’s and Young Person’s Act as well as school medical services. Once students have cut them out they can review the cards under the two headings and then use them as a basis for producing an extended piece of writing. Depending upon the class this could take the form of an essay or even a newspaper report with contrasting views. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911 Know: What reforms did the Liberals introduce 1906 - 1911? Understand: How successful was each reform at helping different groups in society? Evaluate: How successful were the Liberal Reforms at solving the problems facing working people? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The reforms introduced by the Liberals 1906 - 1911? Explain: How successful was each reform at helping different groups in society? Analyse: How successful were the Liberal Reforms at improving the lives of working people? This resource is provided in Microsoft Word format so it can be easily tailored to suit the needs of your students. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transport Revolution: What impact did the railways have on Britain 1840 - 1900?
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Transport Revolution: What impact did the railways have on Britain 1840 - 1900?

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These outstanding resources look at a key turning point in both British history. They have been tried, tested and adapted over the past 25 years. You may have come across an earlier version on other website’s, but these have been fully updated, interactive and designed to promote debate, discussion and opportunities for AFL. The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What changes took place as a result of the railways? Understand: What economic, political, social and environmental changes took place? Evaluate: Which changes were the most significant? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & Describe: The changes that took place as a result of the railways 1840 - 1900? Explain: The impact of the railways on the economy, society, environment and politics in Britain? Analyse: which changes were the most significant? Synthesis: Analyse & Explain how the changes were interconnected? The PowerPoint includes ten activities which can be customised for your students, including the card sort activity that I have also included in this package. In addition, the PP includes 15 information slides that are linked to the activities. Activity 1 is a simple snowing balling starter using the key words. Activity 2 is an alternative starter centered around two images of the ancient world and a picture of the building of the railways and asks which one required the greatest achievement using muscle power alone? Activity 3 is designed around some map work looking at the impact of the railways on the environment and landscape. Activity 4, is focused around the economic impact of the railways and the jobs they created in other industries. Activities 5 and 6 are numeracy tasks that get students to calculate how much businessmen could save transporting goods by railways in todays money - all calculations / answers are included. Activity 7, looks at the impact of the railways had on literature and culture. The rest of the PP includes the card sort activity and as well as the extended writing and pupil mark scheme, which could be used for peer assessment if you wish. As with all my resources they are designed to engage and provide students with steps to access the higher grades. This is reflected in the prompts that have included both in the card sort and the extended writing task / essay for their assessment. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the Roman Empire collapse?
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Why did the Roman Empire collapse?

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This outstanding lesson has been refined and field tested by experienced teachers. It is designed to help students assess which factors played a crucial role in the collapse of the Roman Empire. This resource is suitable for the full ability range and is a great way of rounding of a course with a fun and engaging activity which can be used as the focus for an assessment or extended piece of writing. The lesson opens with either a snowballing or buzz and go starter. It then sets the scene for the decline of the Empire and looks at the roles played by internal civil wars, climate change, inflation, declining population, the Roman Army and the Barbarian invasions, in it’s final collapse. This is then followed up with a card sort activity and a possible thinking skills review triangle which can then be used by students to help write an extended piece of writing. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document and as well as a thirteen slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions, six heading cards and fourteen statements that can be sorted under them as part of the main activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, information slides, historical sources to support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview that I have uploaded. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: Why factors caused the collapse of the Roman Empire? Understand: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Empire? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Change & Continuity, Source Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The different factors which caused the collapse of the Empire Explain: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Roman Empire? Analyse: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Moral Dilemmas: Who should receive the Kidney Transplant?
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Moral Dilemmas: Who should receive the Kidney Transplant?

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What sort of factors do we take into consideration when faced with difficult moral choices? How has our ethical or moral code been influenced? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the ethical challenges faced by doctors when deciding who should be given a kidney transplant. This is a lesson designed to be done in groups or pairs before feeding back to a class discussion on the issue. This is a great lesson with which to kick start your tutor time, RE , Science or philosophy and ethics course off with some great engaging discussions. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable PowerPoint presentation which includes information slides, aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, links to relevant video clips, activities and resources to be photocopied and given out to students. The lesson begins by looking at what is morality and how how ethical codes are formed. You have a choice of starters or activities. The scene is then set for the medical ethical debate on who should receive the kidney transplant. Each group or pair of students should be given a copy of the first table which includes the background information about each patient. They are expected to review this patient information and decide upon their rank order of priority. Their results can then be fed back to the class for discussion. The teacher then has the option of either giving out the second patient update information or displaying it upon the board. Students should then be given another opportunity to review their choices before feeding back to a class discussion and producing an extended piece of writing explaining their final decision. The final slides include a plenary which includes information and video links explaining why organ donation is important in the UK. If you plan to use this elsewhere you might be able to find some similar adverts relevant to your country. I’ve also included a selection of possible homeworks. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: What is morality? Understand: What do we take into consideration before we make moral choices? Evaluate: Who should receive the life saving Kidney Transplant? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What is morality? Explain: What do we take into consideration before we make moral choices? Analyze: Who should receive the life saving Kidney Transplant? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you have purchased this resource in the past, I have recently uploaded a new PowerPoint to accompany the main worksheet. Both resources include information, historical sources, tasks and activities. However, the PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims of the first lesson are: Know: How Hadrian’s Wall was built and designed? Understand: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Hadrian Wall’s defences? Can You Explain: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Whilst the aims of the much shorter second lesson, which could be set as a homework are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Understand: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Explain: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Can You Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
How Bloody was Queen Mary I, 1553 - 1558?
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How Bloody was Queen Mary I, 1553 - 1558?

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This outstanding lesson has been featured at various history teacher conferences across Europe and featured on several well known websites as an example of outstanding practice. It has also been used as a training resource on how to teach the difficult topic of historical interpretation to students. The aim of this exciting lesson is to help students assess just how bloody Queen Mary I was by evaluating the views of both eye witnesses from the time and historians. It is suitable for a range of abilities, but mainly core and advanced. When you download this lesson you will have a PowerPoint as well as word document with 12 primary and secondary sources about the reign of Queen Mary I 1553 - 1558. The PowerPoint includes a snowballing and pair and share starters, slides on why Mary I executed the protestants and why she is such a controversial historical figure. This is followed up with links to carefully selected video clips which can be used with your students. Afterwards, you then have the luxury of deciding whether to do the card sort exercise either a continuum, pro and con organiser or as a simple sort. I would recommend printing off the appropriate slides on A3 to go along with these activities. Sometimes, I allow my more able students to decide individually which organiser they wish to use, but you could always decide for different groups as part of your differentiation. Once this has been complete, students can then have a go at answering the assessment question in activity 4: Does Mary I deserve the title, ‘Bloody Mary’? This slide also includes a suggested structure for answering the question, along with possible connectives. I've also thrown in my award winning literacy and persuasive literacy mats to help sweeten the deal. The final plenary slides looking at how history is written will help your students draw their own conclusions about just how bloody was Queen Mary I. The Aims & Objectives are: Theme: Consequences of the break with Rome? Know: Why did Queen Mary I burn protestant heretics? Understand: How has Mary been viewed by both contemporaries and historians? Evaluate: Does Mary I deserve the title 'Bloody Mary'? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Which sources support / disagree with the 'Bloody Mary' interpretation? Explain: Why do people disagree about how 'Bloody' Mary I was? Analyse: How far does Queen Mary deserve the title 'Bloody Mary?' If you like this resource, check out some of my other resources on this topic such as the 'consequences of the break with Rome' for middle and lower ability students and my blood thirsty resource on 'why were people prepared to die for their beliefs in the sixteen and seventeenth centuries?' Kind Regards Roy
Why did US Government policy towards the Native Americans change 1830 - 1851?
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Why did US Government policy towards the Native Americans change 1830 - 1851?

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This great card sort is designed to get students to understand why the US Government changed its policies towards Native Americans over the period 1834 - 1851. It is suitable for the full range of ability and works alongside with any mainstream text book or video on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download two single page documents, the first includes the card sort activity, the second the answers. In the first stage of the activity, students match the actions of the US Government with their impact or consequences. In the second stage, they can then reorganise them into their chronological order. The end result is a summary is a great revision guide on how the US Government policies changed towards the Native Americans. Once students have stuck the cards into their books, they can then feedback to a class discussion on which key event was the turning point in the attitude of the government towards the Native Americans living on the Great Plains. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: GCSE American West Know: What were the different policies of the US Government towards the Native Americans in the period 1834 - 1851? Understand: What consequences did these policies have on the Native Americans? Evaluate: Which was the most significant? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & Decribe: US Policies towards the Native Americans 1834 - 1851 Explain: What consequences did these policies have on the Native Americans? Analysis: Which were the most significant? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy