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The History Academy

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your priorities. I have personally have spent over 26 years in the classroom and publishing resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create you own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your priorities. I have personally have spent over 26 years in the classroom and publishing resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create you own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links
Love Island - Who should Queen Elizabeth I Marry?

Love Island - Who should Queen Elizabeth I Marry?

This outstanding lesson uses the popular ITV drama ‘Love Island’ theme to help KS4 students understand why marriage and the succession was such a controversial issue for Elizabeth I. This lesson is suitable for the full range of ability, but please do review all the video clips that have been especially chosen for the ‘Love Island’ genre before you show them to your students. These resources makes an excellent end of term lesson or a key focus for the GCSE depth study on Elizabeth I. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan England Know: Why was the issue of the succession and marriage so important? Understand: The arguments for and against Elizabeth getting married Evaluate: Elizabeth’s potential suitors and whether they were suitable. Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why was the issue of succession and marriage important? Explain: The arguments for and against Elizabeth getting married Analyse: Elizabeth’s potential suitors and whether they were suitable. When you purchase this lesson you will be able to download a fully editable PowerPoint Presentation and an accompanying Mircosoft Word document. The PowerPoint presentation includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, links to video clips, tasks and activities to help drive the lesson. Whilst the Word document, includes a single page document with a table to help students summarise the key information about each suitor. The lesson begins with a snowballing starter before moving on to a review activity based around what Elizabeth I was looking for in a prospective husband. The PowerPoint then looks at the advantages and disadvantages of marriage for Elizabeth I as a way of setting the scene for the love island activity. Students are then introduced to the four main suitors via the love island theme. The following slides then include information and relevant video links from main stream movies to help them complete the summary sheet and form a judgement on the suitablity of each man as a prospective husband in preparation for activity 4. Next, using the ‘Love Island’ genre, students then have to write the script for a video diary for Elizabeth I, explaining who she would prefer to ‘couple up with.’ The following slides and historical sources look at why Elizabeth I decided not to get married in the end and why she cultivated the image of the ‘Virgin Queen.’ The lesson is then finally rounded off with an extended writing activity. For additional information, please refer to the preview information.
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The Home Front, 1939 -1945

The Home Front, 1939 -1945

These outstanding resources have been designed to help students studying the Home Front during the Second World War. They are suitable for the full range of ability and should take between 9 to 10 hours of curriculum time to complete. Each lesson comes with a fully editable worksheet and PowerPoint, which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, tasks, activities, links to video clips, thinking skills and active learning exercises. These resources have been repeatedly tested on the front line in the classroom and have been improved based upon best practice over 26 years. For more information, please click on each resource. You can purchase them individually, but by buying them as a bundle you will have over 29%.
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What problems faced Henry VIII in 1525?

What problems faced Henry VIII in 1525?

These outstanding resources have been designed to help students studying the problems facing Henry VIII in 1525? Each resource can be used independently or in conjunction with each other as differentiation. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a worksheet, PowerPoint and a card sort. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, consolidation exercises, information slides and links to video clips. The PowerPoint also includes a beautifully presented diagram summarising Henry VIII’s problems which can be easily printed off and used with students as a classification exercise. I have also included various other alternative activities, depending upon your photocopying budget including a speech and thinking skills review exercise to help students decide which problems were the most important. Alternatively, you could have a go at the card sort exercise which includes four of Henry VIII’s main problems and a series of information cards that can be matched. Everything has been carefully differentiated and can be easily adapted for the full range of ability. This is one of my favourite lessons and there is enough to last a class 2/3 lessons can be used to make you sparkle and shine for Ofsted or an observation lesson. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why did Henry VIII break from Rome? Know: What problems faced Henry VIII in 1525? Understand: Which problems were connected to money, religion, power and a legitimate heir? Evaluate: Why did Henry VIII decide to break with Rome? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing Henry VIII in 1527? Explain: Which problems were linked to money, religion, power and Henry’s need for a legitimate heir? Analyse: Why Did Henry VIII break with Rome? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: Impact of the Treaty of Versailles on Germany

Card Sort: Impact of the Treaty of Versailles on Germany

This outstanding resource has been written by experienced history teachers to help students studying understand the political, economic, military and territorial impact of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919. It can be used as a revision activity, starter or plenary and should easily work alongside any main stream resource on this topic. If you are looking for a resource that provides more challenge or promotes more discussion, then check out my diamond resource on why the Germans hated the Treaty of Versailles. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a full editable Microsoft word document which contains a lesson objective, instructions, four heading cards and 16 cards on the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919. Once students have cut out and matched the cards, they can extend their learning by trying to explain which of the terms Germany would have found the most humiliating. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Treaty of Versailles Know: What were the terms of the Treaty of Versailles? Understand: What were the economic, political, territorial and military consequences for Germany? Evaluate: which of the terms would most Germans have found the most humiliating? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919? Explain: The economic, political, territorial and military consequences of the treaty for Germany? Analyse: Which consequences or terms were the most humiliating for Germany? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: Weimar Constitution's Strengths & Weaknesses

Card Sort: Weimar Constitution's Strengths & Weaknesses

After Germany lost the First World War, the Kaiser fled and a new democratic government of Germany was declared in February 1919, at the small town of Weimar. The constitution that was drawn was amongst the most liberal in Europe, However, it contained a number of strengths and weaknesses that played a key part in the instability which helped the Nazis into power. This innovative and creative activity has been carefully designed to help students understand the key features of the Weimar Constitution and assess both its strengths and weaknesses. It is designed to work along side any main stream resource on this topic, whilst the nature of these resource will appeal to the full spectrum of ability. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains an learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labeled ‘Strengths’ and ‘Weaknesses’, as well as fourteen cards which describe features of the Weimar Constitution. Once students have assessed which cards are ‘Strengths’ or ‘Weaknesses’ they can then pair them up to the sub headings: President, Chancellor, Reichstag, Proportional Representations, The Voters, Article 48 and the Bill of Rights. This resource makes a great starter or plenary to completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Once completed, students will have a detailed summary diagram of the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution. The aims and objectives of this less are: Theme: Was the Weimar Republic doomed to failure? Know: What were the key features of the Weimar Constitution? Understand: What were the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution? Evaluate: Begin to form a judgement on whether the Weimar Republic was doomed from the start? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The key features of the Weimar Constitution? Explain: Which features were ‘Strengths’ or ‘Weaknesses’? Analyse: How far was the Weimar Republic doomed from the start? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Henry VIII's Personality - Source Analysis

Henry VIII's Personality - Source Analysis

This great resources has never failed in 24 years to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning. All my colleagues have routinely used as it is a popular resource, especially when used along side a few video clips about Henry. For example, the opening scene from the film 'a Man for all Seasons', when Henry VIII arrives at the home of Sir Thomas Moore and jumps into the mud! The resource contains five primary sources and one secondary. The task and activities are designed to get students to explore these sources and try and describe what sort of man Henry VIII was and how his personality changed over time. It is always worthwhile pointing out that after Henry VIII's jousting accident, his leg was pretty painful with the ulcers he developed and this would have had a significant impact on his personality. The activities also try to get students to understand that what commentators said both at the time and after his death, may have had an impact on how favourably they described him. I have also added a PowerPoint to work alongside this resource with all the relevant video clips linked into the slides. I have also included additional activities to suit the full range of learners. Anyway, have fun with this resource, I have also uploaded a writing frame which can be used alongside the homework activity to help students structure their letter to the King of France. Theme: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome? Know: What sort of man was Henry VIII? Understand: How did Henry VIII's personality change over time? Evaluate: How reliable are the sources describing Henry VIII? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What can we learn from the sources about Henry VIII? Explain: How have the descriptions of his personality changed over time? Analyse: Begin to form a judgement on why some sources are more reliable than others. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy PS If you like this resource, why not check out my Dingbat Card game on Henry VIII?
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How to cope with exam stress?

How to cope with exam stress?

This great resource has been designed to help students identify what causes stress and increases it at around the exam period and how to successfully manage it through a variety of strategies. Strategically it could form an important part of a whole school health and wellbeing drive to support students and could be delivered in bespoke PSE lessons or during form tutor time. When you purchase this resource you be able to download a 32 page PowerPoint which includes a wide range of starters, plenaries and activities to help students fulfil the lesson objectives below: Theme: Health and Wellbeing at school • Know: What are the causes of stress and its effects on your body? • Understand: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Evaluate: Which strategies are the most effective for you? WILF – What Am I Looking For? • Identify & describe: The causes and effects of stress on your body? • Explain: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Analyse: Which strategies are the most effective for you? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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How bloody was Queen Mary I, 1553 - 1558?

How bloody was Queen Mary I, 1553 - 1558?

This outstanding lesson has been featured at various history teacher conferences across Europe and featured on several well known websites as an example of outstanding practice. It has also been used as a training resource on how to teach the difficult topic of historical interpretation to students. The aim of this exciting lesson is to help students assess just how bloody Queen Mary I was by evaluating the views of both eye witnesses from the time and historians. It is suitable for a range of abilities, but mainly core and advanced. When you download this lesson you will have a PowerPoint as well as word document with 12 primary and secondary sources about the reign of Queen Mary I 1553 - 1558. The PowerPoint includes a snowballing and pair and share starters, slides on why Mary I executed the protestants and why she is such a controversial historical figure. This is followed up with links to carefully selected video clips which can be used with your students. Afterwards, you then have the luxury of deciding whether to do the card sort exercise either a continuum, pro and con organiser or as a simple sort. I would recommend printing off the appropriate slides on A3 to go along with these activities. Sometimes, I allow my more able students to decide individually which organiser they wish to use, but you could always decide for different groups as part of your differentiation. Once this has been complete, students can then have a go at answering the assessment question in activity 4: Does Mary I deserve the title, ‘Bloody Mary’? This slide also includes a suggested structure for answering the question, along with possible connectives. I've also thrown in my award winning literacy and persuasive literacy mats to help sweeten the deal. The final plenary slides looking at how history is written will help your students draw their own conclusions about just how bloody was Queen Mary I. The Aims & Objectives are: Theme: Consequences of the break with Rome? Know: Why did Queen Mary I burn protestant heretics? Understand: How has Mary been viewed by both contemporaries and historians? Evaluate: Does Mary I deserve the title 'Bloody Mary'? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Which sources support / disagree with the 'Bloody Mary' interpretation? Explain: Why do people disagree about how 'Bloody' Mary I was? Analyse: How far does Queen Mary deserve the title 'Bloody Mary?' If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.
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Card Sort: How did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?

Card Sort: How did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?

This outstanding resource has been designed for students studying the new GCSE syllabus on Weimar Germany 1918 - 1933. It focuses on the key reasons why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933. It can be used as a starter, consolidation exercise, plenary or even a homework activity. This activity is designed to appeal to students of all abilities and has a stretch and challenge question at the end which can be used either as a discussion point or as the focus for a written task. When you purchase this resource it includes a fully editable two page Microsoft Word document with a learning aim and three activities. It also includes eight heading cards labeled propaganda, election promises, wealthy backers, support, the depression, Weimar constitution, technology, Hitler’s image and eight matching statement cards which explain why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933. At the bottom of the page there is an extension question that provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have know by explaining the two main reason. Depending upon your photocopying budget, on page two I have included a third activity with matching images to go with each heading and explanation. When completed, this resource creates a useful revision guide which looks very impressive visually. Depending upon the ability of the class, it should take no more than 20 minutes to do the card sort. Afterwards they could have a go at doing an extended question answering the question: ‘Why did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?’ The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Rise of Hitler Know: What factors helped Hitler become Chancellor? Understand: What roles were played by economic, social and political factors in Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The key reasons why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933? Explain: What roles were played by political, social and economic factors in his appointment? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Bayeux tapestry Card Sort Activity for 1066

Bayeux tapestry Card Sort Activity for 1066

This great little resource / puzzle is designed to help develop students' knowledge of the events in 1066 from the Norman perspective by getting them to match the captions with the scenes from the Bayeux Tapestry. This outstanding story boarding activity will also give students the opportunity to discuss, self and peer assess their understanding of one of the worlds most famous primary sources. Objective: To sort the story of what happened in 1066 into its correct chronological order using the pictures from the Bayeux Tapestry. Instruction: Cut out the pictures and captions. Match the pictures to the captions. Then place them in order to tell the story of the key events of the Tapestry. There are 13 captions and 13 images I have provided two documents for this activity - but you only really need the first one as I wanted to be able to show case the high quality images that I have carefully selected, so that they would photocopy for classroom use in either greyscale or colour. I would recommend getting students to stick their work on to A3 paper, but they could just as easily span a double page spread in an A4 exercise book. This activity is suitable for abilities of students, but I have deliberately included some challenge in this activity so that students will have to work collaboratively and look closely at the source. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Source Analysis: Oliver Cromwell - Hero or Villain?

Source Analysis: Oliver Cromwell - Hero or Villain?

This active learning lesson has been created to help students access the role played by Oliver Cromwell by analysing a series of primary and secondary sources describing his actions during the English Civil War. The key interpretation is provided by the historian JP Kenyon, which is then investigated by sorting the sources under the two headings of ‘hero’ or villain.’ However, if your photocopying budget can extended to printing off a class set of A3 sheets, I have also provided two beautifully designed graphic organisers that the cards can be stuck to in order to create a revision aid or classroom display. Once this has been complete, students can then have a go at answering the question: How far was Oliver Cromwell a hero or a villain? I would recommend that this resource should be used with either a core or advanced group as there is a lot of reading, which would be too much for a foundation group with low literacy skills. If you are looking for something a little easier, I have made a another simpler card sort which just looks at the facts. This can be bought separately or as a bundle. When you purchase this resources you will be able to download a fully editable two page Microsoft Word document and a 10 slide PowerPoint Presentation. The PP includes aims, objectives, outcomes, two starters, information slides, templates, video links an The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Protectorate and Interregnum Know: What sort of leader was Oliver Cromwell? Understand: How has Cromwell’s rule as Lord Protector been interpreted? Evaluate: How far does the evidence support the interpretation of Oliver Cromwell as a ‘hero’ or ‘villain’? Skills: Interpretation, Source Analysis & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What sort of leader was Oliver Cromwell? Explain: How has Cromwell’s rule as Lord Protector been interpreted? Analyse: How far does the evidence support the interpretation of Oliver Cromwell as a ‘hero’ or ‘villain’? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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The Home Front: Gas Masks

The Home Front: Gas Masks

This lesson is designed to help students understand why the government issued 38 million gas masks and how it convinced people to carry them around with them. It also looks at why Hitler didn’t used gas as a weapon against Britain, but did against the Jews and other ethnic groups in the concentration camps. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate information slides, sources and links to video clips. It includes a worksheet with the key information, sources and 5 tasks, one of which includes creating a spider graph summary as well as a propaganda poster. The PowerPoint also includes additional stretch and challenge questions. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did the government issue 38 million gas masks? Understand: How did the government persuade people to carry them with them? Evaluate: How successfully did Britain prepare its people for war? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did the government issue gas masks? Explain: How did the government persuade people to carry them with them? Analyse: How successfully did Britain prepare its people for war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. This lesson is part of a series which can be downloaded separately or as a discount bundle. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Card Sort: Causes of the First World War

Card Sort: Causes of the First World War

This outstanding resource is designed to be used with a wide range of abilities, to help them understand the MAIN (Military Alliances, Arms race, Imperialist and Nationalist) causes of the First World War. The resource includes two pages of activities, which have been carefully designed so that page one can be used with KS3 students, whilst page two includes extension cards to add challenge for KS4 /5. The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can easily customise the cards for your students by adding or deleting them. The more able at KS3 could have a go at sorting the extension cards. The instructions / tasks that have been set for this activity are as follows: 1. Cut out the cards and sort them under one of the four headings below. 2. Review the cards with your partner. Which factor do you think was the most important? 3. Create a key to show which factors were either long term or short term causes ? 4. Extended answer: What were the causes of the First World War? The last part of the resource includes a essay plan, with sentence starters to help students write a essay explaining the causes of the First World War. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The First World War 1914 - 1918 Know: What were the MAIN causes of the First World War? Understand: What role did each MAIN cause play in starting the First World War? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the MAIN causes of the First World War? Explain: What role did each MAIN cause play in starting the First World War? Analyse: What was the most important cause of the First World War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Who were the Pilgrim Fathers?

Who were the Pilgrim Fathers?

This outstanding lesson is designed to helped students understand who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in America. It is a classic resource which has never failed to engage my students and has been carefully tweaked over the years to get the best possible outcomes. The resource can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customized to suit the needs of your students. These resource can be purchased at a significantly discounted price as a bundled item with my other resources on James I, Witchcraft and The GunPowder Plot. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a sixteen slide PowerPoint Presentation and a three page worksheet. The PowerPoint includes all the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, historical sources, starters, plenaries, information slides, tasks, video links and activities to work alongside the worksheet. The first page of the worksheet includes primary sources from the period as well as information on both the traditional and revisionist versions on who the Pilgrim Fathers were and why they left England to settle in the USA. The second page includes a range of different activities, including a starter and consolidation exercises to suit the full range of ability, whilst the third page includes two flow charts or decision trees that can be printed off, completed by students and stuck into their books to show the two different interpretations or versions of the history of the Pilgrim Fathers. I have also linked in a video that I have posted on You Tube on this topic which can be previewed with this resource. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War? •Know: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Understand: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Evaluate: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? •Skills: Source Analysis, Cause and Consequence WILF – What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: Who were the Pilgrim Fathers? •Explain: Why did they leave Europe to settle in America? •Analyse: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers decide to settle around Cape Cod? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Was Guy Fawkes Framed?

Was Guy Fawkes Framed?

This much loved resource has now been updated to PowerPoint so that it is accessible for the full ability range through a change of multimedia and interactive content. If you wish to buy the worksheet version which was the number one download on school history, it can still be purchased via my TES shop separately or as a bundled item. The lesson comes in two sections. The first looks at the traditional story of the Gunpowder Pot as it has been taught to school children for hundreds of years. I have created a series of questions and activities aimed at foundation and core students that helps them to study an old Victorian school history book version. This is a great exercise to help students appreciate how history has been taught in the past. I have uploaded a copy of my my chronology card sort on the Gunpowder Plot, which can be used as a starter or consolidation exercise. I have also linked in the Nick Knowles version of the Gunpowder The next section looks a the revisionist version of the Gunpowder Plot and gives students a series of contemporary sources and secondary research by historians to help them decide whether Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty. The activity aims to get them to draw a table to help them analyse the information before having a go at writing an extended answer or a newspaper report from either a Catholic or Protestant stand point on what happened. In order to help students analyse the sources I have included a range of graphic organisers, that you can select from. which can be printed off alongside the historical sources. The aims and objectives are: Theme: What were the consequences of the break with Rome? •Know: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Understand: Why did the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Evaluate: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? WILF - What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Explain: Why would the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Analyse: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
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Queen Elizabeth I - Classroom Display Slides

Queen Elizabeth I - Classroom Display Slides

This great resource makes a really effective classroom display for GCSE or A Level students studying Elizabeth I. The high quality nature of the images makes them worthwhile printing off in colour and laminating. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a seventeen slide PowerPoint Presentation which includes information and pictures that can be printed off in colour for display purposes in your classroom. Please see the preview for more information
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Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall

This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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The English Martyrs - why were people prepared to die for their beliefs in the 16th Century?

The English Martyrs - why were people prepared to die for their beliefs in the 16th Century?

This outstanding resource is an old favourite of mine and was downloaded over 70,000 times on the schoolhistory.co.uk website. This new and updated versions comes with some great new activities. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: What were the consequences of the break with Rome? Know: What did people believe about how to get to Heaven or Hell? Understand: Why were people prepared to die for their beliefs? Evaluate: What was the most important reason? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What did people believe about Heaven & Hell? Explain: Why people were prepared to die for their beliefs? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on the consequences of the Break with Rome on religious beliefs in Britain? This resource includes six activities and one assessment task with a pupil friendly assessment for learning mark scheme with next steps feedback. Activity 1 is designed a snowballing starter using all the key words. Full instructions included. The first part of the lesson looks at what people believed in the 16th Century and explains the different Catholic and Protestant views of how they believed Christians could get their souls cleaned in the 16th Century. This part of the lesson links in well with my lesson on the reformation or why was there religious conflict in the 16th & 17th Centuries. Activity 2 is designed to build upon what students have learnt in the first two slides through a source analysis of image of Hell / Purgatory, which can be completed in groups / pairs. Activity 3 is a feedback activity linked to Activity 2 with an opportunity to mark / improve their answers with purple pen. This is followed up the class discussion in Activity 4 around with a predictive discussion around why people were prepared to die for their beliefs linked to their ideas of Heave and Hell. Activity 5 focuses around the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre in Paris in 1572 to provide students with a comparison with what was happening in England at this time. I have included some great sound effects to accompany these slides - please see the instructions at the end for unzipping the presentation. Activity 6 is a consolidation exercise which asks the question who was the bloodiest Tudor. I have included statistics and links to video clips to help extend the learning here. The final task is an extended piece of writing and includes an AFL blooms pupil mark scheme on the question 'Why were people willing to die for their beliefs in the 16th Century? ' I've also included some advice for students on how to structure their answers. These slides could be printed of for the less able students. I have uploaded the same lesson twice. The zipped version includes all the sound effects. Kind Regards Roy
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How successful was the New Deal - Card Sort Activity

How successful was the New Deal - Card Sort Activity

This outstanding resource is designed to help students assess how successful the New Deal 1933 was at helping the US economy recover from 1933 to 1941. It is suitable for the full range of ability of students from 14 to 18, as I have included a mixture of easy as well as challenging statements. The resource includes a single A4 sheet, with two heading cards labelled 'successful' and 'unsuccessful' as well as 22 statements that can be sorted under either headings. I would recommend getting your students to cut out the cards, sort them and then feed back to the class or their group before sticking them into their books. If you are pressed for time, then you could always get your students to use the heading cards to create a key or colour in the statement using highlighters. There are several extension activities that you an then so with the sorted statements. Firstly, they could create a key to label some of the statements 'Relief, Recovery or Reform.' Secondly, they could use the sorted statements to attempt an extended question on: 'How successful was the New Deal from 1933 - 1941. Theme: The USA in the 1930s. Know: What 'action' did FDR take through his New Deal to help the American economy recover? Understand: In what areas of the economy did the New Deal succeed / fail? Evaluate: How far did the New Deal help the US economy to recover 1933 - 1941? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The 'action' taken by FDR to help the economy recover? Explain: In what areas of the economy did the New Deal succeed or fail? Analyse: How far did the New Deal help the US economy to recover 1933 - 1941? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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What problems faced James I when he became King of England in 1603?

What problems faced James I when he became King of England in 1603?

This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the problems facing James I when he became King of England in 1603? Students are presented with a number of challenges facing James I including religious, financial, foreign relations, the growth of Parliament and his beliefs in the Divine Rights of Kings. Once they have reviewed these problems, students are then asked to produce a speech suggesting how he could solve them, which can be peer and self reviewed using the resources included in the PowerPoint. Finally, they can then complete a quick heads and tails activity matching the action that James I took to solve his problems and then assess how successful they were. This brilliant lesson also helps to set the scene for the Gunpowder Plot and for the long term causes of the English Civil War. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint presentation that includes everything that you will need for this lesson. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, consolidation exercises, information slides and links to video clips. The PowerPoint also includes two beautifully presented diagrams summarising James I’s problems for higher and lower ability students, which can be easily printed off and used with students as a classification exercise. I have also included various other alternative activities, depending upon your photocopying budget including a speech and thinking skills review exercise to help students decide which problems were the most important. The resource also includes a heads and tails activity which can also be printed off or copied by students off the board. I have included screen shots of all the slides in the preview slides. Everything has been carefully differentiated and can be easily adapted for the full range of ability. This is one of my favourite lessons and there is enough to last a class 2/3 lessons can be used to make you sparkle and shine for Ofsted or an observation lesson. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

This great resource has been tried and tested over the past 30 years and has never failed to grab the attention and engage my students. This introductory lesson looks at the causes and consequences of the Transport Revolution in Britain. The worksheet is designed for middle and top set students, whilst the accompanying PowerPoint has a mix of activities to engage the full range of abilities. As with all my activities, they designed to be interactive and promote discussion and develop students thinking skills. They include: A snowballing starter activity of the key words for the lesson Source matching exercise of different transport methods in the 18th Century A self / review activity of the answers Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 400AD to 1700 Heads and tails activity of the causes and consequences of 18th century transport revolution A thinking skills review exercise of which were the most important factors Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 1700 to 1800 The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced Britain's transport network in 1750? Understand: Why did Britain’s transport network change in the 18th Century? Evaluate: Why were these changes necessary? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing the transport network in 1750? Explain: What pressures were forcing the system to change? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which pressures or causes were the most important? If you like this free resource, then you will love the rest of the lessons that I have created to follow on from it on roads, canals and railways. I have for many years freely given away my resources on www.schoolhistory.co.uk but since I have been made redundant from a multi-academy trust because I was the union rep, I now have to make an income from supply teaching and freelance publishing work. If you would like to stay up-to-date with my latest updates then place click follow on my TES Shop or visit my History Academy pages on Facebook, You Tube or Google. Please click like or share on these pages. I need as much help as I can get. Kind Regards Roy Huggins https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/?ref=bookmarks https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLaTC2tToHdQyRVDYhw_lIw
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Oracy - Speaking Starters

Oracy - Speaking Starters

This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy
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Literacy: A writing Frame to Argue

Literacy: A writing Frame to Argue

This literacy resource has been designed to help students argue by giving them a series of sentence starters. It can be used in a number of different ways. You can print off the sheets and use them as a worksheet or cut them out as cards. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
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A FRAME TO RECOUNT A SCHOOL VISIT

A FRAME TO RECOUNT A SCHOOL VISIT

These literacy cards are designed to be cut out or used as worksheet to help students write a report or recount of a school visit. As with all the resources in these series, it a must have as it's simple and it works. Have fun and check out some of my other resources. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
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