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The History Academy

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your priorities. I have personally have spent over 26 years in the classroom and publishing resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create you own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your priorities. I have personally have spent over 26 years in the classroom and publishing resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create you own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links
Card Sort: How did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?
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Card Sort: How did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?

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This outstanding resource has been designed for students studying the new GCSE syllabus on Weimar Germany 1918 - 1933. It focuses on the key reasons why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933. It can be used as a starter, consolidation exercise, plenary or even a homework activity. This activity is designed to appeal to students of all abilities and has a stretch and challenge question at the end which can be used either as a discussion point or as the focus for a written task. When you purchase this resource it includes a fully editable two page Microsoft Word document with a learning aim and three activities. It also includes eight heading cards labeled propaganda, election promises, wealthy backers, support, the depression, Weimar constitution, technology, Hitler’s image and eight matching statement cards which explain why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933. At the bottom of the page there is an extension question that provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have know by explaining the two main reason. Depending upon your photocopying budget, on page two I have included a third activity with matching images to go with each heading and explanation. When completed, this resource creates a useful revision guide which looks very impressive visually. Depending upon the ability of the class, it should take no more than 20 minutes to do the card sort. Afterwards they could have a go at doing an extended question answering the question: ‘Why did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?’ The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Rise of Hitler Know: What factors helped Hitler become Chancellor? Understand: What roles were played by economic, social and political factors in Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The key reasons why Hitler became Chancellor in 1933? Explain: What roles were played by political, social and economic factors in his appointment? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
GCSE American West: The Gold Rush
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GCSE American West: The Gold Rush

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These outstanding resources has been a labour of love on the Gold Rush 1848 - 1850s. I have spared no expense in time and effort in trying to produce what I feel is a world class resource. However, don’t take my word for it and check it out for yourself and see what you think. It forms a series of resources that I have written for my students on the American West and are available for download from my TES shop - The History Academy. When you purchase this resource you will be supplied with a PowerPoint and an accompanying card sort on the consequences of the gold rush for different groups living in the American West. The PowerPoint contains the aims and objectives as well as six activities, including a snowballing starter of the key words, a source based analysis question on the short term consequences, a source annotation exercise, two thinking skills graphic organisers that try students to explain the importance of each stage of the gold rush as well as come to an overall conclusion on the negative and positive consequences for different groups living in the American West. I have also included an exam style question with a pupil mark scheme to help students structure a balanced answer. The card sort includes statements on the impact of the gold rush on different groups in western society, law and order, the economy and expansion of the US. Additional tasks get students to review which consequences were positive or negative for different groups. This should be used alongside the PowerPoint. I’ve also included some carefully selected video clips, which are hyperlinked to You Tube. Please remember that they will only work whilst the slide show is on. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Early Settlers in the American West. Know: Why was there a gold rush in California in early 1848? Understand: The different events of the gold rush and their impact on the West? Evaluate: The impact of the Californian gold rush on different groups? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance and Source Analysis WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key events of the gold rush? Explain: The importance of these events and their consequences for different groups living in the American West? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on how far different groups were affected by the gold rush? Anyway, have fun exploring both the bright and the dark side of this truly amazing turning point in US History. If you would like to remain updated about additional resources then please check out my TES shop or follow The History Academy on either twitter or Facebook. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Queen Elizabeth I's problems  in 1588
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Card Sort: Queen Elizabeth I's problems in 1588

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This outstanding card sort is designed to help students understand the problems facing Elizabeth I in 1558. This resource is suitable for the full range of learners and be used as a starter, plenary, homework or main activity depending upon the ability of your class. When you purchase this lesson you will receive a card sort with six headings labelled religion, defence, money, foreign relations, marriage and poverty and crime as well as eight accompanying statements which need to be matched up or sorted. Once complete, I have included two optional extension exercise including sorting the problems in to which were the most important as well as an extended essay question. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The reign of Queen Elizabeth I, 1558 - 1603 Know: What problems faced Elizabeth I when she became queen in 1558? Understand: Which problems were linked to money, religion, poverty, defence, relations with other countries, marriage? Evaluate: Which problems posed the greatest threat to Elizabeth I? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What problems did Elizabeth I? Explain: Which problems were linked to money, religion, poverty, foreign relations, marriage and defence? Analyse: Which problem posed the greatest threat to Elizabeth I? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: What were the causes of the Cold War?
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Diamond 9: What were the causes of the Cold War?

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This outstanding resource is designed to provide stretch and challenge for the more able students by promoting discussion and debate on the causes of the Cold War. It can be used as a starter, plenary or as a revision activity. The resource includes nine diamond shaped cards which include a range of factors to explain the causes of the Cold War. The document is provided in Microsoft Word so you can edit the resource if you wish to customise it further. Once students have cut the cards out they are set three tasks including: 1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. Record and explain why you have removed them. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. Record and explain your reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using what you think are the four most important events or factors that helped to cause the Cold War? At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Cold War 1945 - 1955 Know: What were the causes of the Cold War? Understand: How did misunderstandings escalate to mistrust? Evaluate: Which were the most significant causes of the Cold War? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: The causes of the Cold War 1945 - 1955? Explain: How are the causes linked together? Analyse: Which were the most significant causes of the Cold War? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Was General Haig the 'butcher of the Somme'?
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Was General Haig the 'butcher of the Somme'?

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This PowerPoint is designed to span two lessons and includes 6 activities to help students assess the tactics that General Haig used at the Battle of the Somme in 1916. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Why was there a stalemate on the Western Front? Know: What tactics did General Haig use at the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Understand: Why did the Battle of the Somme end in a stalemate? Evaluate: Was General Haig the 'Butcher of the Somme? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Analysis and Interpretation WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What happened during the Battle of the Somme in 1916? Explain - Why did Haig's tactics fail to achieve a breakthrough? Analyse - How far was Haig's responsible for the failure to break through in 1916? These activities include a snowballing starter, source analysis comparing John Laffin and the BBC's Blackadder interpretation of General Haig, a contemporary cartoon analysis to assess public reaction in 1916, a summary diagram of why Haig tactics failed and a source analysis comparing the different perspectives of George Coppard and Haig of the progress made on the first day of the attack. I've also included a card sort activity which could be used as the basis for an assessment or extended writing on the topic. In all there are 40 slides which can be easily customised for your students. It could also be uploaded to a virtual learning environment and used as an independent learning resource for homework. Professional Knowledge For those of you who are new to the profession, this topic is controversial for a number of reasons. Firstly, the leadership of the British Army during the war is traditionally described by some historians as 'lions led by donkeys.' Please note that this interpretation first grew out a dissatisfaction with the Treaty of Versailles and the concept that the First World War would be the 'War to end all wars' in the 1930's. Clearly by then, many of the sacrifices appeared to have been in vain with the rise of Hitler and the threat of war. However, in the immediate aftermath of the First World War, Haig was seen as a hero. He was also the man who set up the Royal British Legion and began the first poppy appeal. Secondly, this topic is controversial for many of our Australian cousins whose sense of national identity grew out of their frustration and anger over the disaster at Gallipoli. This has led to feeling that the British tactics were a complete failure in all theatres of war and has led to the writing of some pretty bad popular history by Australian tour guides like John Laffin in his book ‘British Butchers and Bunglers of WW1' to almost justify the Republican Movement in Australia. Anyway, have fun and I look forward to your feedback.
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis: Oliver Cromwell - Hero or Villain?
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Source Analysis: Oliver Cromwell - Hero or Villain?

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This active learning lesson has been created to help students access the role played by Oliver Cromwell by analysing a series of primary and secondary sources describing his actions during the English Civil War. The key interpretation is provided by the historian JP Kenyon, which is then investigated by sorting the sources under the two headings of ‘hero’ or villain.’ However, if your photocopying budget can extended to printing off a class set of A3 sheets, I have also provided two beautifully designed graphic organisers that the cards can be stuck to in order to create a revision aid or classroom display. Once this has been complete, students can then have a go at answering the question: How far was Oliver Cromwell a hero or a villain? I would recommend that this resource should be used with either a core or advanced group as there is a lot of reading, which would be too much for a foundation group with low literacy skills. If you are looking for something a little easier, I have made a another simpler card sort which just looks at the facts. This can be bought separately or as a bundle. When you purchase this resources you will be able to download a fully editable two page Microsoft Word document and a 10 slide PowerPoint Presentation. The PP includes aims, objectives, outcomes, two starters, information slides, templates, video links an The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Protectorate and Interregnum Know: What sort of leader was Oliver Cromwell? Understand: How has Cromwell’s rule as Lord Protector been interpreted? Evaluate: How far does the evidence support the interpretation of Oliver Cromwell as a ‘hero’ or ‘villain’? Skills: Interpretation, Source Analysis & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What sort of leader was Oliver Cromwell? Explain: How has Cromwell’s rule as Lord Protector been interpreted? Analyse: How far does the evidence support the interpretation of Oliver Cromwell as a ‘hero’ or ‘villain’? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: What were the short and long term consequences of the Peasants' Revolt?
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Card Sort: What were the short and long term consequences of the Peasants' Revolt?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the Peasant’s Revolt in 1381. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity. If you are looking for a resource to provide additional stretch and challenge for your more able students, then why not check out my diamond 9 activity on this topic? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document which can be differentiated further if you wish. The Word document includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labeled ‘short’ and ‘long’ term consequences as well as twelve statements / consequences. Once students have cut out the cards and correctly matched the statements with either the ‘short’ or ‘long’ term headings, they can extend their understanding further by sorting them into their order of importance before sticking them into their books. This can be followed by making students to write an extended answer using the cards as a guide on the consequences of the Peasants Revolt. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Medieval Society Know: What happened after the Peasants’ Revolt? Understand: Which changes were ‘long’ or ‘short’ term consequences? Evaluate: which changes were the most important? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What happened after the Peasants’ Revolt? Explain: Which consequences were ‘short’ or ‘long’ term? Analyse: Which changes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: The Glorious Revolution in 1688
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Card Sort: The Glorious Revolution in 1688

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This outstanding resource is designed to get students decide what the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution. It is suitable for the full ability range and is a fun and interactive resource with which to engage your students. It can be uses as a starter, plenary or homework activity and should work alongside any main stream resource on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word Document, which contains instructions, a learning objectives, two activities, two heading cards labeled cause and consequence and eight information cards to be cut out and sorted underneath them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Making of the UK Know: What were the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution? Understand: Why did James II become increasingly unpopular? Evaluate: How significant was the Glorious Revolution in 1688? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution? Explain: Why did James I become increasingly unpopular and what impact did the revolution have on Catholics living in Britain? Analyse: Begin to make a judgement on the significance of the Glorious Revolution? This resource should appeal to a range of abilities and learning styles. It shouldn’t take more than 10 to 12 minutes for a middle ability class to cut out the cards and sort them. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Market Place Activity: Textile Industry 1750 - 1900
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Market Place Activity: Textile Industry 1750 - 1900

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying how the Industrial Revolution changed the Textile Industry between 1750 - 1900. It is suitable for a range of learners and includes some great ideas and strategies to try out with your students. The information for the market place activity on the on the new inventions which transformed the textile industry has been beautifully presented and carefully linked to the decline of the domestic system and the birth of factories and mills. The follow up activities look at how the new machines changed the way people worked and looks at some of their negative reactions. The resource includes a PowerPoint with aims, objectives, a snowballing starter and an introduction and activity which gets students to draw links between the population explosion and the increased demand for more textiles. The next five slides, which can be printed off on A4 or A3, contain information on the Flying Shuttle,The Spinning Jenny, The Water Frame, the Mule and the Power Loom. I have also produced a summary table for each table for the students to complete. This could be printed off or copied off the board, depending upon your photocopy budget. I usually get each table to feed back on one invention and then complete a class version on the board, depending upon the ability of the class. The next few slides include a link to a video clip and explain the impact of the new machines on peoples lives. This is followed up two source based questions and a link to the song 'Poverty Knock.' Where appropriate, I have provided differentiated activities. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Know: Why did Britain's Textile Industry change 1750 - 1900? Understand: How did each new invention contribute to the changes? Evaluate: What impact did these new machines have on peoples’ lives? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Why did Britain's textile industry change 1750 - 1900? Explain: How did each new machine contribute to the changes taking place? Analyse: What impact did these new machines have on peoples’ lives? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Why did Custer lose at the Little Bighorn?
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Card Sort: Why did Custer lose at the Little Bighorn?

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This outstanding resource is designed to help students evaluate how far Custer was responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. It could be used alongside any main stream text book or resource or as an independent stand alone resource. It also makes an excellent revision activity on the topic as well as preparation for an essay or extended essay on the topic. If you would like to provide even more challenge, then why not check out my diamond 9 activity on this topic. I also have an iPad version which can be purchased from my TES shop. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a two page A4 sheet in Microsoft Word. The activity includes four heading cards labelled Leadership of Custer, Leadership of Reno Benteen, Leadership of Crazy Horse and Other US Army Leaders as well as 28 statement cards. If you wish to add challenge then you could delete the heading cards and ask your students to come up with their own headings. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: What role did the US Army play in the defeat of the Plains Indians? Know: What happened during the Battle of the Little Bighorn? Understand: What roles were played by Custer and Crazy Horse in the defeat of the US Army? Evaluate: How far was Custer responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Little Bighorn? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: What happened during the Battle of the Little Bighorn? Explain: What roles were played by Custer and Crazy Horse in the defeat of the US Army? Analyse: How far was Custer responsible for the defeat of the US Army at the Little Bighorn? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
What problems faced the Homesteaders on the Great Plains?
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What problems faced the Homesteaders on the Great Plains?

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This great little card sort is a matching exercise that can be used as a starter, plenary or even a mini plenary with a range of abilities and age groups. Students cut out the cards and match the problem facing homesteaders on the Great Plains with the correct description. Its simple, fun and provides for some kinaesthetic learning. At the end of the activity you can ask your students to rank the problems 1 to 10 and then explain which one was the most important. Theme: The American West Know: What problems faced homesteaders on the Great Plains? Understand: How did the environment and climate make farming challenging in the Great Plains? Evaluate: Which problem was the most significant? WILF Identify and describe: The problems facing the Homesteaders? Describe: What the problems that the Homesteaders faced by matching the key words with the correct description? Analyse: Evaluate and come to a judgement on which problem was the most significant? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Henry VIII's Personality - Source Analysis
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Henry VIII's Personality - Source Analysis

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This great resources has never failed in 24 years to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning. All my colleagues have routinely used as it is a popular resource, especially when used along side a few video clips about Henry. For example, the opening scene from the film 'a Man for all Seasons', when Henry VIII arrives at the home of Sir Thomas Moore and jumps into the mud! The resource contains five primary sources and one secondary. The task and activities are designed to get students to explore these sources and try and describe what sort of man Henry VIII was and how his personality changed over time. It is always worthwhile pointing out that after Henry VIII's jousting accident, his leg was pretty painful with the ulcers he developed and this would have had a significant impact on his personality. The activities also try to get students to understand that what commentators said both at the time and after his death, may have had an impact on how favourably they described him. I have also added a PowerPoint to work alongside this resource with all the relevant video clips linked into the slides. I have also included additional activities to suit the full range of learners. Anyway, have fun with this resource, I have also uploaded a writing frame which can be used alongside the homework activity to help students structure their letter to the King of France. Theme: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome? Know: What sort of man was Henry VIII? Understand: How did Henry VIII's personality change over time? Evaluate: How reliable are the sources describing Henry VIII? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What can we learn from the sources about Henry VIII? Explain: How have the descriptions of his personality changed over time? Analyse: Begin to form a judgement on why some sources are more reliable than others. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy PS If you like this resource, why not check out my Dingbat Card game on Henry VIII?
Home Front: The Home Guard - Dad's Army
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Home Front: The Home Guard - Dad's Army

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This lesson on the Home Guard forms is part of a series that can be downloaded either separately or part of a discounted bundle on the Home Front. It is designed to helped students understand why the British government set up the Home Guard during the Second World War and the role in played in helped to defend the country from invasion. The lesson material is suitable for the full ability range. When you purchase these resources you will be able to download a three page worksheet with the key information, sources and tasks, one of which includes a thinking skills review activity. In addition, you will also be able to download an accompanying PowerPoint with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks and activities as well as information slides, sources, starters, plenaries and links to relevant video clips. This is designed a full interactive and multimedia lesson. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did Britain set-up the Home Guard? Understand: Why were they nick named ‘Dad’s Army?’ Evaluate: What role did the Home Guard play in helping Britain win the war? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Britain set up the Home Guard? Explain: Why were they nicked named ‘Dad Army?’ Analyse: What role did the Home Guard play in helping Britain win the war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Christmas Truce, 1914
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The Christmas Truce, 1914

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These outstanding resources on the Christmas Truce in 1914 are a great lesson no matter the time of year, but they make a particularly moving, touching and inspirational end to the long Autumn Term on the meaning of Christmas. I've provided two resources with this lesson. They can be used in any subject across the curriculum. This topic links to History, Music, RE, PSCHE, English, Drama and Music. The first resource is a worksheet with a series of activities aimed to support a wide spectrum of learners. I've built in extension tasks as well as DART strategies for the less able. The PowerPoint is designed to primarily to support the delivery of the worksheet, but includes the aims and objectives, a snowballing starter for pair and share, differentiated questions for different groups, historical sources and diagrams to help illustrate core ideas as well as carefully selected video and music clips. This is one of my favourite lessons and I am confident that it will quickly become yours as well. Treat yourself to good lesson, avoid the painful Christmas videos at the end of term and create a memorable educational moment in time for your students with this truly inspirational story. You will learn: Theme: What is the meaning of Christmas? Know: What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Understand: Why did the British and German troops hold an unofficial truce? Evaluate: Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Analysis, Evaluation and Judgement. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify = What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Describe = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Explain = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Analyse= Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? The best documentary to watch on this - rather than a Christmas video is: Days that shook the World – The Christmas Truce. See your history department for a copy. If they are worth their salt they will have a copy! I am offering these resources at a knock down price - for a cup of coffee. I was recently made redundant by a multi-academy trust because I was the union rep. If you like my resources then check out the rest on my TES shop or if you fancy a chat about any of my resources or simply want to be kept updated, then you can follow the The History Academy on Twitter, Facebook or You Tube. Anyway, have fun and whatever time of year it is - Peace and Goodwill to all Men and Women. Please help to keep alive the spirit of the Christmas Truce, 1914. Kind Regards Roy https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/
What problems faced Henry VIII in 1525?
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What problems faced Henry VIII in 1525?

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These outstanding resources have been designed to help students studying the problems facing Henry VIII in 1525? Each resource can be used independently or in conjunction with each other as differentiation. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a worksheet, PowerPoint and a card sort. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, consolidation exercises, information slides and links to video clips. The PowerPoint also includes a beautifully presented diagram summarising Henry VIII’s problems which can be easily printed off and used with students as a classification exercise. I have also included various other alternative activities, depending upon your photocopying budget including a speech and thinking skills review exercise to help students decide which problems were the most important. Alternatively, you could have a go at the card sort exercise which includes four of Henry VIII’s main problems and a series of information cards that can be matched. Everything has been carefully differentiated and can be easily adapted for the full range of ability. This is one of my favourite lessons and there is enough to last a class 2/3 lessons can be used to make you sparkle and shine for Ofsted or an observation lesson. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why did Henry VIII break from Rome? Know: What problems faced Henry VIII in 1525? Understand: Which problems were connected to money, religion, power and a legitimate heir? Evaluate: Why did Henry VIII decide to break with Rome? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing Henry VIII in 1527? Explain: Which problems were linked to money, religion, power and Henry’s need for a legitimate heir? Analyse: Why Did Henry VIII break with Rome? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Evaluating historical sources from the First World War
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Evaluating historical sources from the First World War

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This beautifully illustrated resource has been designed to help KS3 students understand the problems historians face when using photographs and letters from the First World War. It looks at the issues surrounding recruitment, morale, the Christmas Truce and the introduction of press censorship and of soldiers personal letters. When you purchase this lesson you will be able to download a PowerPoint and an accompanying lesson plan. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, information slides, photocopy sheets, video clip links, starters, plenaries and activities that drive the lesson. The lesson begins with a snowballing starter of the key words. This is followed up by a ‘buzz and go’ peer review sheet where students spend two minutes writing down what they already know about how to use a historical source, this is then passed onto the next person to peer review and add an extra point and so forth until all four squares are complete. At this stage, I get my students to nominate someone to feedback for their table before moving onto the next three information slides on how to use a source successfully, followed by the problems the army faced in recruiting people from September to December 1914 and then the Christmas Truce. At the relevant points, I ask my students why they think the number of people volunteering dropped off and how the British public would react to the photographs of British and German soldiers during the Christmas Truce. We then discuss the steps taken by the British Army to ban cameras, censor letters and newspapers after the Christmas Truce to protect morale. Depending upon how much time you have, I then set my students one of two tasks. The first task involves censoring a soldier’s letter from the trenches to make sure it does not damage morale back home or give away military secrets, meanwhile the second task involves imagining that they are a newspaper editor in 1914 who has to sort through a series of photographs from the trenches and decide which ones could be printed. Both these activities are followed up by questions which get students to justify and explain their selection of which information to censor. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: How to use historical sources for an enquiry on the First World War? Understand: What problems face historians using sources from the First World War? Evaluate: What information would have been published or written about the war? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How to use a historical sources during an historical enquiry? Explain: What problems face historians using sources from the First World War? Analyse: What information would have been published or written about the war?
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate
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Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate

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This literacy resource has been designed to help students to either discuss or debate in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet or cut out. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900
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Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

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This great resource has been tried and tested over the past 30 years and has never failed to grab the attention and engage my students. This introductory lesson looks at the causes and consequences of the Transport Revolution in Britain. The worksheet is designed for middle and top set students, whilst the accompanying PowerPoint has a mix of activities to engage the full range of abilities. As with all my activities, they designed to be interactive and promote discussion and develop students thinking skills. They include: A snowballing starter activity of the key words for the lesson Source matching exercise of different transport methods in the 18th Century A self / review activity of the answers Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 400AD to 1700 Heads and tails activity of the causes and consequences of 18th century transport revolution A thinking skills review exercise of which were the most important factors Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 1700 to 1800 The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced Britain's transport network in 1750? Understand: Why did Britain’s transport network change in the 18th Century? Evaluate: Why were these changes necessary? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing the transport network in 1750? Explain: What pressures were forcing the system to change? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which pressures or causes were the most important? If you like this free resource, then you will love the rest of the lessons that I have created to follow on from it on roads, canals and railways. I have for many years freely given away my resources on www.schoolhistory.co.uk but since I have been made redundant from a multi-academy trust because I was the union rep, I now have to make an income from supply teaching and freelance publishing work. If you would like to stay up-to-date with my latest updates then place click follow on my TES Shop or visit my History Academy pages on Facebook, You Tube or Google. Please click like or share on these pages. I need as much help as I can get. Kind Regards Roy Huggins https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/?ref=bookmarks https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLaTC2tToHdQyRVDYhw_lIw
Anti- Semitism: Nazi Persecution of the Jews 1918 - 1945
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Anti- Semitism: Nazi Persecution of the Jews 1918 - 1945

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These resources / unit of work looks at why the Nazi persecution of the Jews became more extreme from 1918 - 1945? The first few chapters look at the status and position of German Jews in 1918 and then moves on to look at the Nazi rise to power and the propaganda, economic, legal, physical attacks on the Jews from 1933 - 1938. Each chapter is designed with revision and summary sections. I have also included my smart notes with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and summary diagrams to accompany the booklet which you can adapt as you go along. The next section then looks at the impact of the war on the next stage of the attack on the Jews by looking at the forced segregation and isolation through ghettoes, which was followed by the work of the Einsatgruppen Battalions as the German Army advanced into the USSR. My booklet then asks the question why did the Nazis then decide to move to a 'Final Solution' before moving onto the industrial methods and tactics used to murder the Jews through 'Destruction through work ' and 'special treatment.' The final section or conclusions then explores some of the historical controversy surrounding how far the German people should be blamed for the persecution of the Jews. If I have quoted from a primary or secondary source then full attribution has been given whenever possible. Some of the key questions or learning outcomes, which these resources explore are listed below: • What impact did the FWW and Treaty of Versailles have on Germany? • How successful was the Weimar Government at bringing economic and political stability to Germany? • What was the status and position of German Jews in 1920? • What impact did the Great Depression have on the support for extremist parties in Weimar Germany? • Why did Hitler become Chancellor of Germany in 1932? • How did Hitler consolidate his power in 1933 – 34? • How did the status and position of Jews change from 1933 – 45? You need to know about: • What rights did German Jews have under the Weimar Constitution? • Why did hatred of the Jews increase from 1919 – 1933? • Why did the Nazis launch a propaganda attack on the Jews? • What impact did the economic attack have on the Jews 1933 – 38? • What impact did the legal attack have on the status and position of Jews living in Germany? • Why did the Nazis launch a physical attack on the Jews in 1938? • What impact did the Second World War have on the Jews in Europe? • Why did the Nazis introduce the Final Solution in 1941? • How did the Nazi regime use industrial methods to persecute the Jews in the Holocaust from 1933 -45?