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The History Academy

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. I have personally spent over 27 years in the classroom and published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create your own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. I have personally spent over 27 years in the classroom and published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates or contact me to create your own customised bundle then can follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?
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Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. The women’s movement was split between the peaceful suffragists on the one hand, who made up nearly 80% of women, whilst on the other there were the better known militant suffragettes. The lesson resources have been designed to suit the full spectrum of ability at KS3 and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. However, I have also included a PowerPoint to accompany the lesson which includes all the necessary background knowledge for the lesson. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document an an accompanying PowerPoint presentation. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Suffragette’ and ‘Suffragist’, along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. Whilst the PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, links to appropriate video clips and additional tasks, including an alternative Venn diagram activity comparing the two groups of campaigners. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. If you are interested you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis: Elizabeth I's Personality
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Source Analysis: Elizabeth I's Personality

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This outstanding lesson is designed to helped students develop their source analysis skills by studying a range of primary and secondary sources that look at her personality and leadership skills as queen. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customised to suit the needs of your own students. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a three page worksheet and a thirteen slide PowerPoint to accompany it. The worksheet includes thirteen carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and a third sheet with the tasks and activities. I usually print the two source sheets together on a single A3 sheet, but they can just as easily be printed off back to back. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, additional activities, copies of the sources for display and a plenary. I have also provided two different styles of tables to be used with students to record their results. You can chose either one or both if you wish to provide an additional layer of differentiation. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Queen Elizabeth I, 1558 – 1603. Know: Who was Queen Elizabeth I? Understand: What can we learn about her from the historical evidence? Evaluate: How successful was Elizabeth I as a leader? Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The personality and character of Queen Elizabeth I? Explain: What can we learn about Elizabeth I from the historical evidence? Analyse: How successful was Queen Elizabeth I? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
How to cope with exam stress?
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How to cope with exam stress?

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This great resource has been designed to help students identify what causes stress and how to successfully manage it through a variety of strategies. Strategically it could form an important part of a whole school health and wellbeing drive to support students and could be delivered in bespoke PSE lessons or during form tutor time. When you purchase this resource you be able to download a 32 page PowerPoint which includes a wide range of starters, plenaries and activities to help students fulfil the lesson objectives below: Theme: Health and Wellbeing at school • Know: What are the causes of stress and its effects on your body? • Understand: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Evaluate: Which strategies are the most effective for you? WILF – What Am I Looking For? • Identify & describe: The causes and effects of stress on your body? • Explain: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Analyse: Which strategies are the most effective for you? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Norman Conquest Scheme of Work with lesson resources
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Norman Conquest Scheme of Work with lesson resources

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This unit is designed to allow students to investigate the Norman invasion and build upon the source skills that students began to develop in the introductory module. The first three units looks at why the Romans, Saxons, Vikings and the Normans have invaded Britain. From a geographical point of view Britain has always been a rich country because of our temperate climate. This allows farmers to produce up to three crops per year, unlike our European counterparts. This makes Britain a rich prize for any War Lord. It is important to stress that British society was multicultural by 1066 as emphased by the place names activity. Units 4 to 7 deal specifically with the Norman Conquest and are primarily focused on the key question, why did William win the Battle of Hastings. Each unit is carefully crafted to get students to write a PEE’d / PEEL’d paragraph addressing the key question. Students must be trained up into peer / self assessing their answers. This package of resources includes all the PowerPoints and worksheets that I use with this scheme of work. They are sold separately on this site, so to buy them all together at a discount price is a real bargain! In terms of differentiation, the aims, objectives, outcomes and starters allow for students to access at different levels. The worksheets include DART strategies, missing word, true and false statements etc. as well as high end questions. Feel free to adapt to suit the needs of your students.
Human Rights Scheme of Work & Resources for Year 7
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Human Rights Scheme of Work & Resources for Year 7

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The module of work forms part of the Citizenship curriculum within School. It sets out to link the theme of ‘rights and responsibilities’ of our students at a local level of citizenship to the wider global context of human rights abuse. The learning journey will see students explore Human Rights set out by the United Nations Convention of Children’s Human Rights before analysing abuses of such rights. Case study examples are highlighted through the work of Amnesty International and the British Red Cross. The concept of push pull factors are explained in relation to asylum seekers and refugees using a Doncaster context before tackling the issue of prejudice against such groups. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Market Place Activity: What part did British women play in helping to win the Second World War?
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Market Place Activity: What part did British women play in helping to win the Second World War?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying what impact the Second World War had on the lives of women and the different roles they played in helping to win the war. The resource can easily be adapted for display purposes but it is designed to be used as a collaborative market place activity. This beautifully illustrated resource is a must have for anyone teaching this topic. The tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability and have been set up around the market place activity where the key slides in the PP are printed off and either pinned on the classroom walls or set out on the tables so that students move around and fill in their information on the summary sheet. This is a very proactive lesson designed to get students up, moving around, sharing and working collaboratively. I have provided additional differentiation by 'ragging' or grading the difficulty of the slides so that the learners can chose their level of challenge. When you purchase this resource you will receive a 17 slide presentations which includes two starters, information slides for the market place activity and a plenary. The information slides for the market place activity looks at the roles women played as in the land army, working in factories, as secret agents or as volunteers for WAAF, ATS, WVS and the WRNS (WRENS). I have also included a table with two levels of challenge for students to complete whilst reviewing the slides during the market place activity. The aims and objectives for these resources are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why was there a shortage of ‘manpower’? Understand: What roles did women play during the Second World War? Evaluate: How important were these roles in helping to win the war? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why was there a shortage of ‘manpower’? Explain: What roles did women play during the Second World War? Analyse: How important were these roles in helping to win the war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Why did the RAF win the Battle of Britain?
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Card Sort: Why did the RAF win the Battle of Britain?

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This classic resource has been created to help students assess the different factors which helped the RAF win the Battle of Britain in 1940. It can be used to help prepare students for an assessment or to lightly touch this popular topic if you are short for curriculum time. It is designed to be used with the full range of ability and to work alongside any main stream text book or video on this topic. For those who are busy or don’t have access to these resources, I have included two suitable links to video clips on YouTube. You can also download a detailed PowerPoint and worksheet on the Battle of Britain from our TES shop along with a SEND version of this card sort. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a two-page word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Technology’, ‘Leadership’, ‘Tactics’ and ‘Organisation’ as well as 25 statement cards that can be cut out and sorted under them. If you are looking to shorten the time spent on the card sort, you could cut out the cards and keep them in envelopes for students to take out and sort, or you could instead create a colour key to help them identify which headings they wanted to sort them under. Page two of the card sort includes six cards which could be left out if you want to save on photocopying or wish to use them as an extension for those who finish early. Once students have completed the card sort, there is a second activity which gets them to write an extended answer to the core question. I would recommend getting your students to use the headings from the card short to help them organise their answer. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Second World War Know: Why did the RAF win the Battle of Britain? Understand: What factors helped the RAF win the Battle of Britain? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why the RAF won the Battle of Britain? Explain: What factors helped the RAF win the Battle of Britain? Analyse: Which was the most important factor? If you are looking for similar resources then please check out our TES shop. If you would like to stay up to date with our latest offerings, then you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal. Kind Regards Roy
The Spanish Armada, 1588
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The Spanish Armada, 1588

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This great lesson has been fine tuned to help students understand and evaluate why the Spanish Armada was defeated in 1588. This fun and engaging lesson is suitable for the full ability range, but I have also produced a lower as well as a higher ability version of this resource which can be purchased separately or as a bundle. On its own the card sort can be used as a starter, plenary, homework or main activity linked to a main stream textbook or video on this topic. However, I have also included a detailed PowerPoint, with additional information, tasks and activities centered around the card sort so that it is a complete lesson. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word document and a separate PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions and eighteen statements to be sorted under three headings labeled ‘Luck’, ‘English Tactics’ and Spanish Mistakes.’. The PowerPoint includes, aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, writing frames, video clips, templates, tasks and activities to help support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview for more information: The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan England Know: What happened to the Spanish Armada in 1588? Understand: Why was the Spanish Armada defeated in 1588? Evaluate: What was the most important reason? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence, Significance & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What happened to the Spanish Armada in 1588? Explain: Why was the Spanish Armada defeated in 1588? Analyze: What was the most important reason? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
US Women's Lib 1950 - 1970 Revision Flash Cards / Dingbats
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US Women's Lib 1950 - 1970 Revision Flash Cards / Dingbats

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These revision cards cover all the key factors that you will need to know about US Women’s Lib or Civil Rights from 1960 - 1970. They make an excellent fun starter, mini plenary or plenary to any lesson. They can also be used by students as revision flash cards. There are three main ways that you can use them. Game 1 involves getting students to read out the key words until the other guesses the topic correctly. Game 2 involves additional challenge and stretch by getting students to describe the topic without using any of the key words on the card. The third game, which adds an additional layer of fun or challenge involves playing a round of Pictionary or Charades. I normally give my students 3 minutes of each round to help activate the learning and warm up the class. You could also have a freestyle round where students decide which game they want to play linked to their learning style. If you are trying to engage some under achieving boys, add some competition and get them to keep score in the back of their books. I would recommend printing them off on card and getting your students to cut them out. Then put the cards into an envelope for class use. If you are a student then keep them in your pocket and use them as a flash card to help you learn the key facts, If there is a term that you do not understand then as your teacher or do some extra research. From a revision perspective, you can print off the cards and get your students to learn the key words for a test or for their exams. These are a win, win resource. The kids will love them and they will help to improve your results. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Home Front: Rationing
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The Home Front: Rationing

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These resources are designed to help students understand why Britain introduced rationing during the Second World War and begin to evaluate how successful the government was at feeding the population. It forms part of a series on the Home Front which can be downloaded separately or a discounted bundle from my TES store. The lesson has been designed so that it suitable for the full range of ability. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint presentation and an accompanying worksheet written in Microsoft Word. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, two starters, a plenary, relevant information slides, differentiated ‘ragged’ tasks, graphic organisers, historical sources and links to video clips on my You Tube Channel. The Word Document includes a three page worksheet with the key information, sources and tasks, one of which includes a thinking skills review activity. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did Britain introduce rationing? Understand: What impact did rationing have on civilians? Evaluate: How successful rationing at feeding the population? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Describe - why did Britain introduce a system of rationing? Explain - what effect did rationing have on everyday life? Analyse - how successful was rationing at feeding the population? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Elizabethan Poor Law
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The Elizabethan Poor Law

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying how Elizabethan society treated the poor by getting them to look at a number of cases and deciding what should happen next. It has been designed by experienced teachers who have field tested this resource in the classroom, whilst being observed by Ofsted. When you purchase this resource it includes a PowerPoint information, which sets out the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and includes all the information, starters, activities that you will need for this lesson. It also includes a step by step lesson plan and a worksheet, which lists each of the characters problems. Once you have completed the starters and reviewed the information on why the Elizabethan's were worried about poverty, your class will be presented with an avatar who will explain how the Elizabethan Poor Law worked. Simply click on the buttons and the avatar will explain how the Elizabethans decided if someone was deserving or undeserving or whether they should be punished or should receive indoor or outdoor relief? When it comes to the next stage you can either print off copies from the PowerPoint or use the worksheet which contains all the cases. As students review each case they have been given to study, they tick the appropriate boxes on the table that is visible in the preview. Once they have looked at their assigned cases they then feedback to a class discussion. The aims and objectives of this fun and enjoyable lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan Age, 1558 – 1603. Know: What are the causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Understand: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Evaluate: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The causes of poverty in the Tudor period? Explain: How did Elizabethan society deal with the poor? Analyse: How fair was the Elizabethan Poor Law? If you are looking for a fun and enjoyable lesson that will impress any observer, then this lesson ticks all the appropriate boxes and even comes with its own lesson plan. If you want to add an extra bit of sparkle then change the customise some of the locations in the cases. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Home Front: The Blitz
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The Home Front: The Blitz

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This outstanding lesson is designed to help students understand why Hitler launched the Blitz on Britain, the impact it had on civilians, whilst evaluating how close it came to breaking morale. In forms part of a series of lessons on the Home Front that can be downloaded separately or bought as part of a discounted bundle. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet with the key information, sources and tasks, one of which includes writing a report evaluating the impact of the Blitz on London. You will also be able to download an accompanying PowerPoint, which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and tasks as well as starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, graphic organisers, video clips and home work tasks. The PowerPoint also includes a living graph / continuum which can be used to evaluate the sources and how far the Blitz was successful at damaging morale. If you stop the show mode, you should be able to drag and drop the sources onto the continuum. For additional information, please view the preview files: The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did Hitler launch the Blitz against Britain? Understand: What impact did the Blitz have on civilians? Evaluate: How successfully did the government prepare Britain for war? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Hitler launch the Blitz? Explain: What impact did the Blitz have on civilians? Analyse: How successfully did the government prepare Britain for war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
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Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Does Prison Work?
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Card Sort: Does Prison Work?

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This thought provocative resource aims to help students assess whether prison sentences work. This is a controversial subject with people from all sides advocating different solutions from longer sentences to rehabilitate prisoners to alternatives sentences based in the community. This card sort can be used with a range of abilities and has never failed to get my students excited, engaged, whilst improving their understanding of this difficult topic. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word document which includes a learning objective, instructions, two headings cards labelled ‘Pros / Advantages’ and ‘Cons / Disadvantages’ as well as sixteen information cards to be sorted. At the end of the document there is an extension question designed to help consolidate the lesson. This is a fully editable document which can be customised if necessary to suit your students. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Crime and Punishment Know: How are people supported in prison? Understand: What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Evaluate: Does prison protect society from crime? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - How are people treated in prison? Explain - What are the advantages and disadvantages or sending people to prison? Analyse - Does prison protect society from crime? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?
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Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?

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This card sort look at the key reasons why Henry VIII broke with Rome and includes both a card sort and a thinking skills review triangle activity to help students decide which was the most important factor. The first resource entitled Card Sort - Henry VIII''s problems includes four headings under which the students can sort the rest of the cards. These are power, religion, money and personal. The rest of the resource then includes 14 cards which can be matched to the headings. Once the cards have been sorted, the students should then be able to move onto the review triangle activity. This is best done in pairs or groups, with one person from each group feeding back their results onto the IWB and explaining their choice. The results from the review triangle and the card sort can then be used, along with any of your other classroom resources, as a basis for students writing an essay or extended piece of writing on this topic. The aims and objectives are as follows: Theme: Why did Henry Break with Rome? Know: What were the key reasons for his decision? Understand: What roles did power, religion, money and personal problems play in his decision? Evaluate: Which was the most important factor? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: what were the main reasons' for Henry's decision to break with Rome? Explain: What roles did religion, money, power and personal issues play in his decision? Analyse: Which was the most important factor? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900
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Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

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This great resource has been tried and tested over the past 30 years and has never failed to grab the attention and engage my students. This introductory lesson looks at the causes and consequences of the Transport Revolution in Britain. The worksheet is designed for middle and top set students, whilst the accompanying PowerPoint has a mix of activities to engage the full range of abilities. As with all my activities, they designed to be interactive and promote discussion and develop students thinking skills. They include: A snowballing starter activity of the key words for the lesson Source matching exercise of different transport methods in the 18th Century A self / review activity of the answers Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 400AD to 1700 Heads and tails activity of the causes and consequences of 18th century transport revolution A thinking skills review exercise of which were the most important factors Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 1700 to 1800 The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced Britain’s transport network in 1750? Understand: Why did Britain’s transport network change in the 18th Century? Evaluate: Why were these changes necessary? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing the transport network in 1750? Explain: What pressures were forcing the system to change? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which pressures or causes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Oracy - Speaking Starters
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Oracy - Speaking Starters

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This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy
GCSE American West: The Gold Rush
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GCSE American West: The Gold Rush

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These outstanding resources has been a labour of love on the Gold Rush 1848 - 1850s. I have spared no expense in time and effort in trying to produce what I feel is a world class resource. However, don’t take my word for it and check it out for yourself and see what you think. It forms a series of resources that I have written for my students on the American West and are available for download from my TES shop - The History Academy. When you purchase this resource you will be supplied with a PowerPoint and an accompanying card sort on the consequences of the gold rush for different groups living in the American West. The PowerPoint contains the aims and objectives as well as six activities, including a snowballing starter of the key words, a source based analysis question on the short term consequences, a source annotation exercise, two thinking skills graphic organisers that try students to explain the importance of each stage of the gold rush as well as come to an overall conclusion on the negative and positive consequences for different groups living in the American West. I have also included an exam style question with a pupil mark scheme to help students structure a balanced answer. The card sort includes statements on the impact of the gold rush on different groups in western society, law and order, the economy and expansion of the US. Additional tasks get students to review which consequences were positive or negative for different groups. This should be used alongside the PowerPoint. I’ve also included some carefully selected video clips, which are hyperlinked to You Tube. Please remember that they will only work whilst the slide show is on. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Early Settlers in the American West. Know: Why was there a gold rush in California in early 1848? Understand: The different events of the gold rush and their impact on the West? Evaluate: The impact of the Californian gold rush on different groups? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance and Source Analysis WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key events of the gold rush? Explain: The importance of these events and their consequences for different groups living in the American West? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on how far different groups were affected by the gold rush? Anyway, have fun exploring both the bright and the dark side of this truly amazing turning point in US History. If you would like to remain updated about additional resources then please check out my TES shop or follow The History Academy on either twitter or Facebook. Kind Regards Roy
Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage
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Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the ‘Middle Passage’ as part of the transatlantic slave trade. The resource can easily be adapted for display purposes but it is designed to be used as a collaborative source investigation. It can also be used as a market place activity. This beautifully illustrated resource is a must have for anyone teaching this topic. The tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability and have been set up around the market place activity where the key slides in the PP are printed off and either pinned on the classroom walls or set out on the tables so that students move around and fill in their information on the summary sheet. Alternatively, the sources are supplied in a booklet format so that each table can investigate a heading before sharing what they have learnt with other groups and the rest of the class. This is a very proactive lesson designed to get students up, moving around, sharing and working collaboratively. I have provided additional differentiation by ‘ragging’ or grading the difficulty of the sources so that the learners can chose their level of challenge. When you purchase this resource you will receive a 18 slide presentation, which includes a snowballing starter, information slides for the market place activity and a plenary. The sources for the market place activity looks at the treatment of slaves and their conditions onboard the slave ship. I have also included a few links to relevant clips on the internet that have been carefully selected. In addition to the PP you will also be able to download a source booklet, a lesson plan and a source summary sheet. The aims and objectives for these resources are: Theme: The Transatlantic Slave Trade Know: What was the slave trade? Understand: How were slaves treated during the ‘Middle Passage’? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How the slave trade worked from Africa to America Explain: How were the slaves treated during the ‘The Middle Passage’? Analyse: How reliable is the evidence? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Anti-Semitism in France:  The Dreyfus Affair
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Anti-Semitism in France: The Dreyfus Affair

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This worksheet covers the key information on the Dreyfus Affair and its impact on anti-Semitism in France. This is a good example to study to highlight the fact that anti-Semitism existed all over Europe, not just in Germany and Russia. There are activities designed for both core and foundation students. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy