Hero image

The History Academy

Average Rating4.81
(based on 208 reviews)

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

837Uploads

201k+Views

96k+Downloads

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Why did women want the vote in 1900?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Why did women want the vote in 1900?

(1)
These outstanding resources have been designed to help students studying why women in Britain wanted the vote in 1900. They have been designed to suit a range of abilities and include a variety of tasks that can be easily adapted. When you purchase this resource you will receive a PointPoint presentation which includes the aims, objectives, starters, plenaries and activities which drive the lesson. You will also be able to download a worksheet which will work along side the presentation and a card sort on arguments for and against women having the vote. There are a total of eight activities built into this lesson including a snowballing starter of the key words, a collaborative exercise around the sister suffragette video, source questions with support, a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting why both rich and poor women wanted the vote and finally a persuasive speech activity along with a writing frame support and peer and self assessment activity sheets. Please see previews. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Aims and Objectives Know: Why did women want the vote? Understand: Why different social groups wanted the vote for women? Evaluate: Why did the women’s movement split into two groups? What am I looking For? Describe: Why some women wanted the vote? Explain: Why different social groups wanted the vote? Analyse: Begin to form a judgment on why the women’s movement split? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Cards Sort: Ethics - Lying
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Cards Sort: Ethics - Lying

(0)
Can lying ever be morally justified? On the one side of the debate we have those who say that under no circumstances can lying ever be justified, whilst on the other side of the debate we have those argue that lying is okay to prevent harm. So for example, was St Peter right to lie about knowing Jesus after he was arrested? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the main arguments for and against lying. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. This lesson is designed to be used in a Moral Philosophy lesson but it is a great tool for tutor time or helping students who need pastoral guidance. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two heads and then sick into their books before they have a go at the extended writing activity / discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as eighteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: Why is it wrong to lie? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lying? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which it s acceptable to lie? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - Why is it wrong to lie? Explain - the arguments for and against lying? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to lie? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Recount / Retell
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Literacy: A Writing Frame to Recount / Retell

(0)
These literacy cards are designed to be cut out or used as worksheet to help students recount or retell a story or event. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Oracy - Speaking Starters
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Oracy - Speaking Starters

(3)
This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy
Humanities Literacy Mat
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Humanities Literacy Mat

(12)
This literacy mat can be printed off back to back in A3 colour and laminated to use with your students in lesson to help them structure their work using the correct sentence starters and connectives. The literacy mat also includes guidance on spelling, punctuation, structuring paragraphs using PEE and PEEL as well as the correct then, their and they're. This is a must have resource for any humanities teacher.
Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort: Fox Hunting Debate

(0)
Fox hunting has become for many an emotive issue with the views of the countryside and cities diverging other whether the sport is a cruel or natural past time. This resource aims to help students understand some of the key issues and help then come to a balanced conclusion on the morality of fox hunting. It be used alongside any main stream text book or video clip as a starter, mini plenary or a consolidation exercise. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted to help summarise the arguments for and against the ban being lifted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Rights and Responsibilities Know: What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lifting the ban on Fox hunting? Evaluate: Should the hunting of all animals be banned or is fox hunting a special case? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is Fox hunting and why was it banned? Explain - the arguments for and against lifting the ban on fox hunting? Analyse - If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Ethics - Just War Theory For & Against
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort: Ethics - Just War Theory For & Against

(0)
Is there such a thing as a just war? Can the massive death and destruction of armed conflict ever be morally justified? Should we stand by and allow innocent people be raped and murdered in horrible acts of genocide? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the main arguments for and against the Just War Theory. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order and then sick into their books before they have a go at the extended writing activity / discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page, fully editable Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen carefully selected statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: What is the Just War Theory? Understand: What are the arguments for and against waging a just war? Evaluate: Are there any moral circumstances in which it s acceptable to wage war? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - The Just War Theory Explain - the arguments for and against fighting a just war? Analyse - Are there any moral circumstances in which it is acceptable to wage war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Plague Doctor, 1664
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

The Plague Doctor, 1664

(0)
If you are looking for a lesson to inspire and engage your students, then this play designed to be read out or performed in lesson on the challenges facing a young physician, his family and servants during the Great Plague of London 1664 - 1665, is just what the doctor ordered. The play and the support materials that have been uploaded are suitable for the full range of ability in a mainstream secondary or high school. Using drama role play or the medium of a play to explore detailed and complex ideas and historical situations can be a particularly effective tools for engaging students of all abilities. This resource was written to be used in a history lesson with students at KS3 or studying GCSE Medicine Through Time, but it is also suitable for use in an English or Drama lesson. To this end, I have created additional tasks and activities that could be used in those subjects. The plots and story line in the play of the Plague Doctor have been written to help students understand the medical knowledge that people used at this crucial moment in history when Britain was on the threshold of the Age of Science. As the story line unfolds, students will learn how people believed that diseases were spread and what attempts they made to try and avoid catching them. They will also learn how people reacted during an outbreak of an epidemic and the problems that this create for medical and civil authorities. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a nine page Word Document which contains the play, as well as a sixteen slide PowerPoint Presentation. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, historical sources, pictures, diagrams, links to appropriate video clips as well as starters, plenaries, tasks and activities to help support the delivery of the play. Please see the preview for more information. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Stuart England 1660 - 1714 Know: How did people react to the outbreak of the plague in London 1664-65? Understand: How did people believe that diseases were spread at this time? Evaluate: How successful were attempts to treat plague victims? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How did people react to the outbreak of the plague in 1664? Explain: How did people believe that diseases were spread at this time? Analyse: How successful were attempts to treat plague victims?
Humanities Literacy Mat
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Humanities Literacy Mat

(1)
This literacy mat can be printed off back to back in A3 colour and laminated to use with your students in lesson to help them structure their work using the correct sentence starters and connectives. The literacy mat also includes guidance on spelling, punctuation, structuring paragraphs using PEE and PEEL as well as the correct then, their and they're. This is a must have resource for any humanities teacher. The idea of a 'mat' is UK idea where you stick or place a resource like this one on the desks of your students to help them structure their work and avoid common mistakes. This resource was created in partnership with Lesley Anne who also has her own TES shop so please check it out as well. Please note, it might be an idea to run this resource through your own US spell checker to avoid any common errors. E.g. we spell words like colour and neighbours slightly differently to you guys across the pond. I have posted this resource at a low price as I believe that it is a must have - give it and go and enjoy. It will impress your principle. In terms of PEE, I always get me students to structure their paragraphs using either PEE or PEEL which stands for Point - Examples - Explain - Link. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Thinking Skills Reliability Square
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Thinking Skills Reliability Square

(0)
This great graphic organiser is designed to help develop students thinking and source analysis skills. Simply paste a copy of the source in the middle of the graphic organise and get your students to complete analyse the source by answering the questions in the squares. As students work their way from the inside out, they will identify what they can learn from the source and consider key issues such as origin, nature and purpose, which have been carefully structured and sequenced to reflect the increasing levels of difficult. Kind Regards Roy
How did William keep control Scheme  of Work with lesson resources
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

How did William keep control Scheme of Work with lesson resources

(0)
This unit is designed to allow students to investigate how William consolidated his control of Britain after the Norman invasion. It starts by looking at the 'Harrying of the North' by William and how he ruthlessness wiped out all opposition to his rule. The second unit looks at how he rewarded his supporters and tightened his control by introducing the Feudal System. Whilst studying this unit it is important to emphases the importance of doing 'homage' and taking the 'oath of allegiance' as William placed considerable importance on this aspect. His key justification for the Norman invasion was his claim that King Harold was an oath breaker and that his victory was a vindication of the just by God. The fourth unit looks at the Domesday Book and how land and wealth was distributed. Please make sure you point how to your students how much land and wealth was given to the Church as the Pope had supported his invasion. The final two units look at the roles played by different types of castles in helping William consulate his control. This resource is best used alongside the Heinemann History series which is referred to in the scheme of work. It represents excellent value as I have included all the relevant lesson resources along with two literacy mats to help students write a persuasive letter to their local Lord explaining why they should replace the Motte and Bailey Castle with a Square Keep Castle. This work makes an excellent display and assessment work, especially if students age their work with tea bags or coffee. All my students have thoroughly enjoyed this scheme of work as it lends itself to memorable educational moments that will last them a lifetime. Kind Regards Roy
The Christmas Truce, 1914
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

The Christmas Truce, 1914

(0)
These outstanding resources on the Christmas Truce in 1914 are a great lesson no matter the time of year, but they make a particularly moving, touching and inspirational end to the long Autumn Term on the meaning of Christmas. I've provided two resources with this lesson. They can be used in any subject across the curriculum. This topic links to History, Music, RE, PSCHE, English, Drama and Music. The first resource is a worksheet with a series of activities aimed to support a wide spectrum of learners. I've built in extension tasks as well as DART strategies for the less able. The PowerPoint is designed to primarily to support the delivery of the worksheet, but includes the aims and objectives, a snowballing starter for pair and share, differentiated questions for different groups, historical sources and diagrams to help illustrate core ideas as well as carefully selected video and music clips. This is one of my favourite lessons and I am confident that it will quickly become yours as well. Treat yourself to good lesson, avoid the painful Christmas videos at the end of term and create a memorable educational moment in time for your students with this truly inspirational story. You will learn: Theme: What is the meaning of Christmas? Know: What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Understand: Why did the British and German troops hold an unofficial truce? Evaluate: Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Analysis, Evaluation and Judgement. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify = What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Describe = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Explain = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Analyse= Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? The best documentary to watch on this - rather than a Christmas video is: Days that shook the World – The Christmas Truce. See your history department for a copy. If they are worth their salt they will have a copy! I am offering these resources at a knock down price - for a cup of coffee. I was recently made redundant by a multi-academy trust because I was the union rep. If you like my resources then check out the rest on my TES shop or if you fancy a chat about any of my resources or simply want to be kept updated, then you can follow the The History Academy on Twitter, Facebook or You Tube. Anyway, have fun and whatever time of year it is - Peace and Goodwill to all Men and Women. Please help to keep alive the spirit of the Christmas Truce, 1914. Kind Regards Roy https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/
Card Sort: Pacifism For & Against
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort: Pacifism For & Against

(0)
Nothing divides opinion like the issue of war and pacifism. Is there such a thing as a just war? Can the taking of another life ever be justified? This outstanding resources has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against pacifism. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Social, Moral, Spiritual Values Know: What is pacifism? Understand: What are the arguments for and against pacifism? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which is acceptable to take another life? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - what is pacifism? Explain - the arguments for and against pacifism? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to take another life? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Ethics - Lying Moral Pros & Cons
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Card Sort: Ethics - Lying Moral Pros & Cons

(0)
Can lying ever be morally justified? On the one side of the debate we have those who say that under no circumstances can lying ever be justified, whilst on the other side of the debate we have those argue that lying is okay to prevent harm. So for example, was St Peter right to lie about knowing Jesus after he was arrested? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the main arguments for and against lying. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. This lesson is designed to be used in an RE or Moral Philosophy lesson but it is a great tool for tutor time or helping students who need pastoral guidance. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as eighteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: Why is it wrong to lie? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lying? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which it s acceptable to lie? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - Why is it wrong to lie? Explain - the arguments for and against lying? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to lie? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
What problems faced Charles I when he became King in 1625?
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

What problems faced Charles I when he became King in 1625?

(0)
This outstanding problem-solving lesson is designed to help students understand the challenges facing Charles I in 1625 and why he decided to rule without Parliament in 1629. Once students have worked their way through the starter exercises, they are presented with a number of problems facing Charles I ranging from religious, financial, foreign relations, the growth of Parliament and his own beliefs in the Divine Rights of Kings. Once they have reviewed, categorised and prioritised these problems, students are then asked to produce a speech suggesting how he could solve them and then peer assess their answers. In the final plenary activity, they are then presented with Charles I’s decision to rule without Parliament and asked to decide whether it would help to solve his problems in the long term.? This lesson is suitable for the full range of ability. I have built a number of different tasks and activities around these different exercises so that you can chose a suitable flight path through the topic. So, for example, students can use to produce their own summary diagram of Charles I’s problems or colour code the exercise book version that I have included at the end of the PP. I have also differentiated the problem slides so that you have a foundation and core version. Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson with a strong literacy focus. When you purchase this lesson, you will be able to download a nineteen slide PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, tasks, activities and templates to help students The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Causes of the English Civil War Know: Why did Charles I decide to rule without Parliament in 1629? Understand: What problems faced Charles I when he became King in 1625? Evaluate: Which problems posed the greatest threat to Charles I? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Charles I decide to rule without Parliament? Explain: What problems did Charles I face in 1625? Analyse: Which problem posed the greatest threat to Charles I? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy Cards / Writing Frame to 'Persuade'
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Literacy Cards / Writing Frame to 'Persuade'

(0)
These literacy cards have been designed to help students write a persuasive piece of writing by giving them a series of sentence starters.. The resource could be printed off as a worksheet and used a s a writing frame or cut out to make a literacy pack of cards that could be kept in an envelope and given out. This is a must have resource that has been designed for use in a British classroom. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Bayeux Tapestry Card Sort Activity for 1066
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Bayeux Tapestry Card Sort Activity for 1066

(1)
This great little resource / puzzle is designed to help develop students' knowledge of the events in 1066 from the Norman perspective by getting them to match the captions with the scenes from the Bayeux Tapestry. This outstanding story boarding activity will also give students the opportunity to discuss, self and peer assess their understanding of one of the worlds most famous primary sources. Objective: To sort the story of what happened in 1066 into its correct chronological order using the pictures from the Bayeux Tapestry. Instruction: Cut out the pictures and captions. Match the pictures to the captions. Then place them in order to tell the story of the key events of the Tapestry. There are 13 captions and 13 images I have provided two documents for this activity - but you only really need the first one as I wanted to be able to show case the high quality images that I have carefully selected, so that they would photocopy for classroom use in either greyscale or colour. I would recommend getting students to stick their work on to A3 paper, but they could just as easily span a double page spread in an A4 exercise book. This activity is suitable for abilities of students, but I have deliberately included some challenge in this activity so that students will have to work collaboratively and look closely at the source. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy cards to discuss / debate
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Literacy cards to discuss / debate

(0)
This literacy resource has been designed to help students to either discuss or debate in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet or cut out to be used as set of literacy cards in the classroom. Please note that they are designed to be used in a British classroom so run it through your US spell checker. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Sacco and Vanettti
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Sacco and Vanettti

(0)
This lesson looks at several key issues surrounding the trail of Sacco and Vanzetti and includes a wide range of contemporary and modern sources to help the learner make up their own min. The aims, objectives and differentiated outcomes are: Theme: The Dark side of the Boom Know: Who were Sacco and Vanzetti and what were they accused of? Understand: How fair was their trail? Understand: Why were some Americans afraid of the new immigrants? Evaluate: How tolerant was the USA in the 1920s? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Evaluation & judgement What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify / Describe – Who were Sacco & Vanzetti? Explain – How fair was their trial and investigation ? Analyse – begin to form a judgement on how tolerant was US society in the 1920s? There are 6 activities built into the lesson including a snowballing starter, an OCR style source question with a pupil mark scheme, a persuasive speech literacy activity for their defence or prosecution, a Venn dig ram source analysis on contemporary reactions, an evidence review sheet on their innocence or guilt and finally an OCR 6 mark question with a mark scheme on 'why were Sacco and Vanzetti executed.' I have been observed several times with this resource and have had this lesson graded as outstanding. I have also included a persuasive literacy mat to help students phrase their speeches. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Persuasive Speech or Writing Literacy Mat
Roy_HugginsRoy_Huggins

Persuasive Speech or Writing Literacy Mat

(0)
This simple literacy mat is designed to help students produce either a persuasive piece of writing or a speech. As you can see from the preview, students are given a series of sentence starters to help them scaffold their answers. This is a tried and tested resource which works brilliantly with students of all abilities. As a history teacher, I used this mat with my students to write formal letters of complain to General Haig about conditions in the trenches or to write a persuasive letter to a Norman Lord recommending why he should replace his Motte and Bailey Castle with a Square Keep. This resource has been so successful that it has been adopted by our English Faculty and spread around both the LEA and our Trust. This is a brilliant resource which works with all ages and abilities. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun with this outstanding resource and stay in touch via social media. Kind Regards Roy