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The History Academy

Average Rating4.81
(based on 208 reviews)

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you have purchased this resource in the past, I have recently uploaded a new PowerPoint to accompany the main worksheet. Both resources include information, historical sources, tasks and activities. However, the PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims of the first lesson are: Know: How Hadrian’s Wall was built and designed? Understand: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Hadrian Wall’s defences? Can You Explain: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Whilst the aims of the much shorter second lesson, which could be set as a homework are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Understand: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Explain: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Can You Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did women want the vote in 1900?
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Why did women want the vote in 1900?

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These outstanding resources have been designed to help students studying why women in Britain wanted the vote in 1900. They have been designed to suit a range of abilities and include a variety of tasks that can be easily adapted. When you purchase this resource you will receive a PointPoint presentation which includes the aims, objectives, starters, plenaries and activities which drive the lesson. You will also be able to download a worksheet which will work along side the presentation and a card sort on arguments for and against women having the vote. There are a total of eight activities built into this lesson including a snowballing starter of the key words, a collaborative exercise around the sister suffragette video, source questions with support, a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting why both rich and poor women wanted the vote and finally a persuasive speech activity along with a writing frame support and peer and self assessment activity sheets. Please see previews. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Aims and Objectives Know: Why did women want the vote? Understand: Why different social groups wanted the vote for women? Evaluate: Why did the women’s movement split into two groups? What am I looking For? Describe: Why some women wanted the vote? Explain: Why different social groups wanted the vote? Analyse: Begin to form a judgment on why the women’s movement split? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Battle of Britain, 1940
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The Battle of Britain, 1940

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This outstanding lesson on why the RAF won the Battle of Britain, was amongst one of our most popular downloads we had schoollhistory.co.uk and has been tried, tested and fine tuned over many years. This newer version has been fully updated with a wider range of tasks and activities to suit the modern classroom, but if you would still like to use the classic version, then I have also included it as a PDF file. These resources are suitable for the full ability range and include a wide range of differentiated activities. When you purchases these resources you will be able to download an eighteen slide PowerPoint to accompany the lesson and two different versions of a four page page worksheet. I have also included a numeracy activity that can be used in lesson or set as homework. The PowerPoint is designed to be used as a standalone resource or if you prefer to accompany the worksheet and contains the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, pictures diagrams, information and links to video clips, that you will need to teach the lesson. With the exception of the classic version, all the worksheets have been supplied in Microsoft Word. The lesson begins by looking at the military situation in 1940 and gets students to analyse why Germany decided to invade and the challenges that they would face trying to cross the English Channel. This is followed up by another activity which gets students to listen to Churchill’s famous ‘we will fight them on the beaches’ speech and to assess why it was made in Parliament and broadcast to the nation. The rest of lesson and activities focus on what happened and why the RAF won. For more information, please refer to the preview slides. The aims and objectives of the lesson are: Theme: The Second World War Know: Why did Germany try and invade Britain during the summer of 1940? Understand: Why did the RAF win the Battle of Britain? Evaluate: How important was the role of technology in the German defeat? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why Germany tried to invade Britain in 1940? Explain: Why the RAF won the Battle of Britain? Analyse: How important was the role of technology in the German defeat? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. It has also been bundled up along with my lessons on Blitzkrieg and Dunkirk. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal.
Why did Great Briitan build an Empire?
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Why did Great Briitan build an Empire?

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This beautifully illustrated lesson has been designed to help students understand why Great Britain wanted to build an empire, This can be quite a challenging topic to teach in an interesting and engaging way, but this tried and tested lesson has been refined in the classroom over many years by experienced teachers. It is suitable for the full ability range and includes eight addition activities to the card sort, which can be mixed and matched to suit your curriculum time and students. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document and a twenty six slide PowerPoint Presentation. The Word Document includes includes a learning objective, instructions, ten heading cards labelled 'Technology’, ‘Trade’, ‘Navy’ , ‘Religion’, ‘Raw Materials’, ‘Competition’, ‘Racism’, ‘Slavery’, ‘Population’ and ‘Power’ as well as 19 statement cards that can be cut out and sorted under them. If you are looking to shorten the time spent on the card sort, you could cut out the cards and keep them in envelopes for students to take out and sort, or you could instead create a color key to help them identify which headings they wanted to sort them under. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, tasks, activities, information slides, historical sources, pictures, maps, diagrams, templates, feedback sheets and a homework exercise. Once students have completed the card sort, there is a second activity which gets them to write an extended answer to the core question. I would recommend getting your students to use the headings from the card sort to help them organize their answer. For more information, please see the preview slides. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: Why did Great Britain build an Empire? Understand: Why did the British Empire become the largest? Evaluate: Which factors were the most important? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Great Britain build an Empire? Explain: Why did the British Empire become the largest? Analyze: Which factors were the most important? If you are looking for similar resources then please check out our TES shop. If you would like to stay up to date with our latest offerings, then you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis: Henry VIII's Personality
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Source Analysis: Henry VIII's Personality

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This great resources has never failed in 24 years to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning. All my colleagues have routinely used as it is a popular resource, especially when used along side a few video clips about Henry. For example, the opening scene from the film 'a Man for all Seasons', when Henry VIII arrives at the home of Sir Thomas Moore and jumps into the mud! The resource contains five primary sources and one secondary. The task and activities are designed to get students to explore these sources and try and describe what sort of man Henry VIII was and how his personality changed over time. It is always worthwhile pointing out that after Henry VIII's jousting accident, his leg was pretty painful with the ulcers he developed and this would have had a significant impact on his personality. The activities also try to get students to understand that what commentators said both at the time and after his death, may have had an impact on how favourably they described him. I have also added a PowerPoint to work alongside this resource with all the relevant video clips linked into the slides. I have also included additional activities to suit the full range of learners. Anyway, have fun with this resource, I have also uploaded a writing frame which can be used alongside the homework activity to help students structure their letter to the King of France. Theme: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome? Know: What sort of man was Henry VIII? Understand: How did Henry VIII's personality change over time? Evaluate: How reliable are the sources describing Henry VIII? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What can we learn from the sources about Henry VIII? Explain: How have the descriptions of his personality changed over time? Analyse: Begin to form a judgement on why some sources are more reliable than others. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy PS If you like this resource, why not check out my Dingbat Card game on Henry VIII?
Germany's Golden Age, 1920s
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Germany's Golden Age, 1920s

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This beautifully designed lesson looks at the cultural changes that took place during Germany’s Golden Age in the 1920s and looks at how they were interpreted by different groups. The information is accessible to a range of abilities and can be used alongside a wide range of main stream text books or used as a stand alone resource. Depending upon the teaching and learning styles in your school, you could deliver the lesson or print off the relevant slides on art, cinema, nightlife, literature and design and get your students to complete their notes in a market place or gather and share activity. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint presentation entitled Germany’s golden age. The first few slides include, aims, objectives, differentiated out comes and two potential starters. The next few slides then set the scene and put the period into its historical context. This includes a beautifully illustrated and animated diagram on the Dawes Plan. This is followed up with information slides with images and relevant video links on cinema, nightlife, literature, art and design in Germany at this time. These could be used as described above as a gather and share exercise. Once complete the next two slides include tasks and information to help students construct a mind map. In order to extend the more able you could always give out text books to provide additional information that they could use for research. The next section of the PowerPoint looks at several different sources on how different groups in Germany reacted to this new explosion of culture and this is then followed up with an AQA GCSE History style questions with an AFL pupil mark scheme for the new syllabus. However, if you use a different exam board the mark schemes are fully editable and could be easily customised to suit your exam board. The Aims & Objectives are: Theme: Weimar Republic 1923 - 1929 Know: What were the key features of Germany’s Golden Age? Understand: What cultural changes took place and why did they happen? Evaluate: How did different people respond to these changes? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key features of Germany’s Golden Age Explain: What cultural changes took place and why did they happen? Analyse: How did different people respond to these changes? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis: Elizabeth I's Personality
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Source Analysis: Elizabeth I's Personality

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This outstanding lesson is designed to helped students develop their source analysis skills by studying a range of primary and secondary sources that look at her personality and leadership skills as queen. It can be used with a range of abilities and can easily be edited to customised to suit the needs of your own students. When you purchase this resource, you will receive a three page worksheet and a thirteen slide PowerPoint to accompany it. The worksheet includes thirteen carefully primary and secondary sources which span two pages of the worksheet and a third sheet with the tasks and activities. I usually print the two source sheets together on a single A3 sheet, but they can just as easily be printed off back to back. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, additional activities, copies of the sources for display and a plenary. I have also provided two different styles of tables to be used with students to record their results. You can chose either one or both if you wish to provide an additional layer of differentiation. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Queen Elizabeth I, 1558 – 1603. Know: Who was Queen Elizabeth I? Understand: What can we learn about her from the historical evidence? Evaluate: How successful was Elizabeth I as a leader? Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The personality and character of Queen Elizabeth I? Explain: What can we learn about Elizabeth I from the historical evidence? Analyse: How successful was Queen Elizabeth I? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: What impact did the Industrial Revolution have on Britain?
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Card Sort: What impact did the Industrial Revolution have on Britain?

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This outstanding card sort has been designed by experienced teachers to help students studying the introduction to the Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1850. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as a starter, plenary, revision or assessment activity. If you are looking for a resource to provide additional stretch and challenge for your more able students, then why not check out my diamond 9 activity on this topic? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document and an accompanying PowerPoint. The Word document includes aims, instructions and eight picture cards and six heading cards. Once students have cut out the cards and correctly matched the statements with their correct heading, they can extend their understanding further by sorting them into their order of importance before sticking them into their books. The PowerPoint includes the aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, a snowballing starter, a brief introduction to the topic and facilitates the card sort. At each stage students should be feeding back to their group or the class and explaining their choices. The discussion and explanation around the choices that they have made are critical in helping them develop their understanding of the topic. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1850 Know: How was industry organised before the Industrial Revolution? Understand: What changed as a result of the Industrial Revolution? Evaluate: which changes were the most important? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: industry before and after the Industrial Revolution Explain: What changed as a result of the Industrial Revolution? Analyse: Which changes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Were the Catholics Framed in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605?
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Were the Catholics Framed in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605?

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This much loved resource has now been updated to PowerPoint so that it is accessible for the full ability range through a change of multimedia and interactive content. If you wish to buy the worksheet version which was the number one download on school history, it can still be purchased via my TES shop separately or as a bundled item. The lesson comes in two sections. The first looks at the traditional story of the Gunpowder Pot as it has been taught to school children for hundreds of years. I have created a series of questions and activities aimed at foundation and core students that helps them to study an old Victorian school history book version. This is a great exercise to help students appreciate how history has been taught in the past. I have uploaded a copy of my my chronology card sort on the Gunpowder Plot, which can be used as a starter or consolidation exercise. I have also linked in the Nick Knowles version of the Gunpowder The next section looks a the revisionist version of the Gunpowder Plot and gives students a series of contemporary sources and secondary research by historians to help them decide whether Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty. The activity aims to get them to draw a table to help them analyse the information before having a go at writing an extended answer or a newspaper report from either a Catholic or Protestant stand point on what happened. In order to help students analyse the sources I have included a range of graphic organisers, that you can select from. which can be printed off alongside the historical sources. The aims and objectives are: Theme: What were the consequences of the break with Rome? •Know: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Understand: Why did the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Evaluate: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? WILF - What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Explain: Why would the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Analyse: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Life on a Slave Plantation
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Life on a Slave Plantation

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students understand the daily challenges facing slaves living on a plantation either in the Carribbean or the southern United States. It is a shocking but engaging lesson that forms part of series on the history of slavery . It comes with both a worksheet and a PowerPoint and a wide range of tasks and activities that are suitable for the full ability range. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet as well as a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and differentiated questions on everyday life in the plantation, the treatment of slaves and their punishments. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Rights and Freedoms Know: What was it like to be sold at auction? Understand: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Evaluate: Why were some slaves treated better than others? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was it like to be sold at auction? Explain: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Analyze: Why were some slaves treated better than others? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis: Why was the Spanish Armada defeated in 1588?
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Source Analysis: Why was the Spanish Armada defeated in 1588?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed and field tested by experienced history teachers who are at the cutting edge of the skills which underscore our subject. Spanish Armada is a topic which is all too often rushed and not given the attention that it deserves, yet it is every bit as important as the Battle of Britain or the Norman Conquest. If those brave Elizabethan seamen, backed up with cutting edge technology and skillful leadership based upon merit rather than NOability had not fought off the invading Spanish Armada, then our island history would have been very different. Then again, maybe fate stepped in to save the day As the inscription on the Armada medal, issued by Elizabeth I in 1588 said: ‘God blew his wind, and they were scattered.’ This lesson has been designed for students with a middle to high ability reading ability. I have produced several different versions of this resource including a Card Sort, Market Place Activity and a Diamond 9 Activity, which can be purchased separately or in a very cost effective bundle which will allow you to differentiate across your low, ,middle and higher ability groups. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a two page Word document and a separate 24 slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions, three heading cards which are labelled ‘Luck’, ‘English Tactics’ and ‘Spanish Mistakes’ as well as fifteen primary and secondary sources which can be cut up by students and sorted or used as a worksheet. The PowerPoint includes, aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, writing frames, video clips, templates, tasks and activities to help support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview for more information: The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Elizabethan England Know: What happened to the Spanish Armada in 1588? Understand: Why was the Spanish Armada defeated in 1588? Evaluate: What was the most important reason? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence, Significance & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What happened to the Spanish Armada in 1588? Explain: Why was the Spanish Armada defeated in 1588? Analyse: What was the most important reason? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Living Graph: Causes of the English Civil War
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Living Graph: Causes of the English Civil War

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students assess the causes of the English Civil War by evaluating the decisions made by James and Charles I and how they affected their popularity. This popular lesson has been repeatedly graded as outstanding as it’s a fun and engaging way to develop students critical higher order thinking skills. This lesson is suitable for the full ability range. Once students have worked their way through a selection of starters that you can chose from, they complete the living graph exercise. They can then color code the information cards as either economic, religious or political causes. This is then consolidated by a thinking skills review triangle activity to decide which factor was the most important. Once these tasks have been completed, the final result could be used for an assessment or for an extended writing task. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a two page word document which contains the information cards and a twelve slide PowerPoint. The PowerPoint is designed to help facilitate the lesson and contains aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, tasks and activities. I have also included a lesson plan. Ideally, the continuum should be printed on A3 paper. For more detailed information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War Know: Why did James and Charles I become increasingly unpopular over time? Understand: What roles did politics, economics and religion play in causing the Civil War? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Why did James and Charles I fall out with Parliament? Explain: What roles did politics, economics and religion play in causing the Civil War? Analyze: Which factor was the most important? If you want to stay up to date about new resources and receive regular updates or even chat about how to use some of these resources, then follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Google Plus. Our aim is to provide cheap and affordable teaching resources for the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time with the people who matter. Kind Regards Roy
How to successfully analyse a source at GCSE and A Level History
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How to successfully analyse a source at GCSE and A Level History

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This great resource is designed to be used a stand alone lesson or to be printed off in colour, laminated and displayed in your classroom. It contains a number of colour slides which explain to students how to analyse a historical source successful by looking at their origin, nature, purpose, access to information etc… Underpinning this is the use of the acronyms PEEL and CCCJ as potential scaffolds or writing frames to help students structure their answers: P = Point E = Example E = Explain L = Link C = Comment C = Content C= Context (Source & Knowledge) J = Judgement In most of the sliders are examples of sentence starters to help your students get started. This is a must have resource for any history teacher wanting to make sure that they are equipped with a range of specialists tools for helping their students sharpen up their analysis. If you like this resource, then check out my TES shop: The History Academy or check out or follow my Twitter, You Tube, Google Plus and Facebook pages, with the same name for further updates and discussions on how to use these resources successfully. My aim to provide low cost resources for the price of a cup of coffee or a happy meal :-) Kind Regards Roy
Roman Roads in Britain
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Roman Roads in Britain

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This popular download has been tried and tested over the years and has has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning on why the Romans built roads in Britain. The activities involve some straight forward question and answers and a consolidation exercise which gets students to map out and label the Roman Roads in Britain. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet and an accompanying PowerPoint. Both include matching pictures, diagrams, historical sources, task and activities. However, the Powerpoint also includes aims, objectives, outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Know: Why did the Romans build roads in Britain? Understand: How the Romans constructed their roads? Evaluate: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Identify: The different reasons why the Romans build roads in Britain? Can You Describe: How the Romans constructed their roads? Can You Explain: How the Roman roads helped them keep control and led to the development of towns? Once you have successfully completed these activities, why not check out my problem solving and literacy resources on planning a Roman Road? You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Invaders and Settlers: The Anglo Saxons
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Invaders and Settlers: The Anglo Saxons

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This lesson is designed as an KS3 introductory module called ‘Invaders and Settlers AD43 - 1066’. It provides a detailed overview of the impact of the Saxon invasion of Britain and addresses key questions such as how do historians find out about the past, where the Saxons invaders or settlers and how multicultural was British society at this time? There is also a focus on the decline and rise again of towns, which is a theme which is returned to in other KS3 modules on medieval towns and industrialisation 1750 - 1900. The tasks and activities included in this module are suitable for the full range of ability at KS3 and are designed as a bridge or transition from KS2. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why was England invaded and settled from 40AD to 1066? Know: How do modern historians find out about the past? Understand: Who were the Anglo Saxons and why did they come to Britain? Evaluate: Were the Anglo Saxons invaders or settlers? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How do historians find out about the past? Explain: Who were the Anglo Saxons and why did they come to Britain? Analyse: Were the Anglo Saxons invaders or settlers? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty eight PowerPoint Presentation which includes starters, plenaries and a range of interactive resources and activities. These include a snowballing stater, buzz , information slides, tasks, activities and video clips on whether the Anglo-Saxons were invaders and settlers and a Venn diagram activity on how did towns change after the Romans left Britain. This is then followed up a series of video task activities which focus on the impact of the Anglo-Saxon’s on Britain, were they invaders or settlers and how do historians find out about the past. I have included summary tables and alternative tasks for this information which you can chose from. Everything you need to photocopy is include in the PP, the relevant video clip has been hyperlinked to my You Tube channel and is also included in the preview which accompanies this resource. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?
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Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?

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This card sort look at the key reasons why Henry VIII broke with Rome and includes both a card sort and a thinking skills review triangle activity to help students decide which was the most important factor. The first resource entitled Card Sort - Henry VIII''s problems includes four headings under which the students can sort the rest of the cards. These are power, religion, money and personal. The rest of the resource then includes 14 cards which can be matched to the headings. Once the cards have been sorted, the students should then be able to move onto the review triangle activity. This is best done in pairs or groups, with one person from each group feeding back their results onto the IWB and explaining their choice. The results from the review triangle and the card sort can then be used, along with any of your other classroom resources, as a basis for students writing an essay or extended piece of writing on this topic. The aims and objectives are as follows: Theme: Why did Henry Break with Rome? Know: What were the key reasons for his decision? Understand: What roles did power, religion, money and personal problems play in his decision? Evaluate: Which was the most important factor? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: what were the main reasons' for Henry's decision to break with Rome? Explain: What roles did religion, money, power and personal issues play in his decision? Analyse: Which was the most important factor? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900: Birth of the Railways
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Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900: Birth of the Railways

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These are outstanding resources which I have used many times over the past 25 years in one shape or another during lesson observations with Ofsted and or LEA advisors. They form part of a series that I have uploaded to the TES on the Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900. These particular resources focus on the birth of the railways up to the period known as 'Railway Mania' in the 1850s. The PowerPoint is designed to work alongside the worksheet, but it can be used as an independent resource on a school VLE or in a lesson. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, starters and three activities that are accessible to a wide spectrum of learners. These activities include a snowballing starter of the key words, a heads and tails activity as well as a thinking skills review triangle activity on what were the most important steps / inventions to the birth of the railways. The worksheet includes similar activities, but also includes several much harder questions to help extend middle and higher ability students. The PowerPoint also contains a number of linked in video clips and animated steam engines. I would like to add that I am not a train spotter, but I've always found that my students, especially the boys have thoroughly enjoyed this topic so put the fun back into the industrial revolution by looking a few machines rather than just focusing on social history. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: Why were the important steps to the introduction of the steam locomotive? Understand: What were the causes of ‘Railway Mania’? Evaluate: Why did the railways rapidly grow from 1830 – 1900? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance and Source Analysis WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key inventions that were necessary for the invention of the locomotive? Explain: What was ‘Railway Mania’? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which factor to the introduction of the railways? Anyway, have fun with these resources. They are full editable. If you like them, then please check out some of my other resources on the building of the railway and their impact of the economy. Kind Regards Roy
Humanities Literacy Mat
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Humanities Literacy Mat

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This literacy mat can be printed off back to back in A3 colour and laminated to use with your students in lesson to help them structure their work using the correct sentence starters and connectives. The literacy mat also includes guidance on spelling, punctuation, structuring paragraphs using PEE and PEEL as well as the correct then, their and they're. This is a must have resource for any humanities teacher.
Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900
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Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

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This great resource has been tried and tested over the past 30 years and has never failed to grab the attention and engage my students. This introductory lesson looks at the causes and consequences of the Transport Revolution in Britain. The worksheet is designed for middle and top set students, whilst the accompanying PowerPoint has a mix of activities to engage the full range of abilities. As with all my activities, they designed to be interactive and promote discussion and develop students thinking skills. They include: A snowballing starter activity of the key words for the lesson Source matching exercise of different transport methods in the 18th Century A self / review activity of the answers Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 400AD to 1700 Heads and tails activity of the causes and consequences of 18th century transport revolution A thinking skills review exercise of which were the most important factors Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 1700 to 1800 The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced Britain’s transport network in 1750? Understand: Why did Britain’s transport network change in the 18th Century? Evaluate: Why were these changes necessary? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing the transport network in 1750? Explain: What pressures were forcing the system to change? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which pressures or causes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Graphic Organisers
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Graphic Organisers

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These graphic organisers can be printed off as worksheets or used on your Interactive Whiteboard for a wide range of subjects and topics to help students analyse sources or compare and contrast ideas.