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The History Academy

Average Rating4.81
(based on 208 reviews)

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Cards Sort: Ethics - Lying
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Cards Sort: Ethics - Lying

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Can lying ever be morally justified? On the one side of the debate we have those who say that under no circumstances can lying ever be justified, whilst on the other side of the debate we have those argue that lying is okay to prevent harm. So for example, was St Peter right to lie about knowing Jesus after he was arrested? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the main arguments for and against lying. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. This lesson is designed to be used in a Moral Philosophy lesson but it is a great tool for tutor time or helping students who need pastoral guidance. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two heads and then sick into their books before they have a go at the extended writing activity / discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as eighteen statements that can sorted under them. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Ethics and Philosophy Know: Why is it wrong to lie? Understand: What are the arguments for and against lying? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which it s acceptable to lie? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - Why is it wrong to lie? Explain - the arguments for and against lying? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to lie? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage
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Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the ‘Middle Passage’ as part of the transatlantic slave trade. The resource can easily be adapted for display purposes but it is designed to be used as a collaborative source investigation. It can also be used as a market place activity. This beautifully illustrated resource is a must have for anyone teaching this topic. The tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability and have been set up around the market place activity where the key slides in the PP are printed off and either pinned on the classroom walls or set out on the tables so that students move around and fill in their information on the summary sheet. Alternatively, the sources are supplied in a booklet format so that each table can investigate a heading before sharing what they have learnt with other groups and the rest of the class. This is a very proactive lesson designed to get students up, moving around, sharing and working collaboratively. I have provided additional differentiation by ‘ragging’ or grading the difficulty of the sources so that the learners can chose their level of challenge. When you purchase this resource you will receive a 18 slide presentation, which includes a snowballing starter, information slides for the market place activity and a plenary. The sources for the market place activity looks at the treatment of slaves and their conditions onboard the slave ship. I have also included a few links to relevant clips on the internet that have been carefully selected. In addition to the PP you will also be able to download a source booklet, a lesson plan and a source summary sheet. The aims and objectives for these resources are: Theme: The Transatlantic Slave Trade Know: What was the slave trade? Understand: How were slaves treated during the ‘Middle Passage’? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How the slave trade worked from Africa to America Explain: How were the slaves treated during the ‘The Middle Passage’? Analyse: How reliable is the evidence? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
How to cope with exam stress?
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How to cope with exam stress?

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This great resource has been designed to help students identify what causes stress and how to successfully manage it through a variety of strategies. Strategically it could form an important part of a whole school health and wellbeing drive to support students and could be delivered in bespoke PSE lessons or during form tutor time. When you purchase this resource you be able to download a 32 page PowerPoint which includes a wide range of starters, plenaries and activities to help students fulfil the lesson objectives below: Theme: Health and Wellbeing at school • Know: What are the causes of stress and its effects on your body? • Understand: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Evaluate: Which strategies are the most effective for you? WILF – What Am I Looking For? • Identify & describe: The causes and effects of stress on your body? • Explain: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Analyse: Which strategies are the most effective for you? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Timeline: Britain & the Slave Trade 1555 - 1833
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Timeline: Britain & the Slave Trade 1555 - 1833

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his beautifully illustrated time line have been designed to help students investigate Britain’s involvement in the slave trade. It is primarily a classroom display, but can also be used to provide information for a market place activity on this topic. The text level of the information slides are suitable for the full ability range. The information spans Britain’s growing involvement in the slave trade, opposition and its eventual abolition. I have included additional file to give you a comprehensive preview of what is included. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download PowerPoint which includes twenty seven information slides on Britain’s involvement in the slave trade from 1555 - 1833. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade 1555 - 1833 Know: Why did Britain get involved in the slave trade? Understand: Why did some people want to abolish the slavery? Evaluate: Why did Britain abolish the slave trade and end slavery? Skills: Collaboration, Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Britain get involved in the slave trade? Explain: Why did some people want to abolish slavery? Analyse: Why did Britain abolish the slave trade and end slavery? If you are looking for similar resources then please check out our TES shop. This lesson can be purchased at a discount as part of a bundled package. If you would like to stay up to date with our latest offerings, then you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: The Glorious Revolution in 1688
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Card Sort: The Glorious Revolution in 1688

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This outstanding resource is designed to get students decide what the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution. It is suitable for the full ability range and is a fun and interactive resource with which to engage your students. It can be uses as a starter, plenary or homework activity and should work alongside any main stream resource on this topic. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Microsoft Word Document, which contains instructions, a learning objectives, two activities, two heading cards labeled cause and consequence and eight information cards to be cut out and sorted underneath them. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Making of the UK Know: What were the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution? Understand: Why did James II become increasingly unpopular? Evaluate: How significant was the Glorious Revolution in 1688? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the causes and consequences of the Glorious Revolution? Explain: Why did James I become increasingly unpopular and what impact did the revolution have on Catholics living in Britain? Analyse: Begin to make a judgement on the significance of the Glorious Revolution? This resource should appeal to a range of abilities and learning styles. It shouldn’t take more than 10 to 12 minutes for a middle ability class to cut out the cards and sort them. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did some women get the vote in 1918?
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Why did some women get the vote in 1918?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversy surrounding why some women got the vote in 1918. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability. If you wish, you can purchase the card sorts separately for less, under the headings of card sort: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? However, to sweeten the deal, I have also included my diamond 9 activity, which can be given to your gifted and talented or more able for as a separate task to extend their critical thinking skills. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download an editable Microsoft Word document as well as a PowerPoint. The Word document include aims, instructions, four heading cards labelled 'Suffragettes', 'Suffragists', 'First World War' and 'Politics as well as twenty statement cards that can be sorted under them. The PowerPoint presentation is designed to help facilitate the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate video clip links, assessment question, pupil mark scheme and feedback sheets. The lesson kicks off with a snowballing starter activity, followed by a brief one side introduction to why some women got the vote in 1918, with an appropriate link to a video clip on YouTube. It is assumed that you have already studied the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist as prior knowledge. The next slide facilitates the card sort, whilst the fourth slide facilitates a pair / group discussion on which factor was the most important. Once this is complete, students can do a follow up assessment on the topic either for homework or next lesson. This optional, but I've included additional slides with a pupil mark scheme that can be easily adapted for to your own assessment scheme if necessary. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: What tactics did suffrage groups use to persuade politicians? Understand: What role did the FWW play in helping to change attitudes? Evaluate: Which historical factor played the most important role? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The tactics used by the suffrage movements? Explain: What role did the First World War play in changing attitudes? Analyse: Make a judgement on which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?
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Card Sort: Why did Henry VIII break with Rome?

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This card sort look at the key reasons why Henry VIII broke with Rome and includes both a card sort and a thinking skills review triangle activity to help students decide which was the most important factor. The first resource entitled Card Sort - Henry VIII’'s problems includes four headings under which the students can sort the rest of the cards. These are power, religion, money and personal. The rest of the resource then includes 14 cards which can be matched to the headings. Once the cards have been sorted, the students should then be able to move onto the review triangle activity. This is best done in pairs or groups, with one person from each group feeding back their results onto the IWB and explaining their choice. The results from the review triangle and the card sort can then be used, along with any of your other classroom resources, as a basis for students writing an essay or extended piece of writing on this topic. The aims and objectives are as follows: Theme: Why did Henry Break with Rome? Know: What were the key reasons for his decision? Understand: What roles did power, religion, money and personal problems play in his decision? Evaluate: Which was the most important factor? WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: what were the main reasons’ for Henry’s decision to break with Rome? Explain: What roles did religion, money, power and personal issues play in his decision? Analyze: Which was the most important factor? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Home Front: Gas Masks
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The Home Front: Gas Masks

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This lesson is designed to help students understand why the government issued 38 million gas masks and how it convinced people to carry them around with them. It also looks at why Hitler didn’t used gas as a weapon against Britain, but did against the Jews and other ethnic groups in the concentration camps. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, appropriate information slides, sources and links to video clips. It includes a worksheet with the key information, sources and 5 tasks, one of which includes creating a spider graph summary as well as a propaganda poster. The PowerPoint also includes additional stretch and challenge questions. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did the government issue 38 million gas masks? Understand: How did the government persuade people to carry them with them? Evaluate: How successfully did Britain prepare its people for war? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did the government issue gas masks? Explain: How did the government persuade people to carry them with them? Analyse: How successfully did Britain prepare its people for war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. This lesson is part of a series which can be downloaded separately or as a discount bundle. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Birth of the Railways
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Birth of the Railways

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This outstanding resource which I have used many times over the past 25 years in one shape or another during lesson observations with Ofsted and or LEA advisors. It forms part of a series that I have uploaded to the TES on the Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900. This particular resources focus on the birth of the railways up to the period known as 'Railway Mania' in the 1850s. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, starters and three activities that are accessible to a wide spectrum of learners. These activities include a snowballing starter of the key words, a heads and tails activity as well as a thinking skills review triangle activity on what were the most important steps / inventions to the birth of the railways. The PowerPoint also contains a number of linked in video clips and animated steam engines. I would like to add that I am not a train spotter, but I've always found that my students, especially the boys have thoroughly enjoyed this topic so put the fun back into the industrial revolution by looking a few machines rather than just focusing on social history. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: Why were the important steps to the introduction of the steam locomotive? Understand: What were the causes of ‘Railway Mania’? Evaluate: Why did the railways rapidly grow from 1830 – 1900? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance and Source Analysis WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key inventions that were necessary for the invention of the locomotive? Explain: What was ‘Railway Mania’? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which factor to the introduction of the railways? Anyway, have fun with this resource. They are full editable. If you like it, then please check out some of my other resources on the building of the railway and their impact of the economy. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Moral Ethics - Pacifism
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Card Sort: Moral Ethics - Pacifism

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Nothing divides opinion like the issue of pacifism and war. Is there such a thing as a just war? Can the taking of another life ever be justified morally? This outstanding resources has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against pacifism. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organize them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Moral philosophy and ethics Know: What is pacifism? Understand: What are the arguments for and against pacifism? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which is acceptable to take another life? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - what is pacifism? Explain - the arguments for and against pacifism? Analyze - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to take another life? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Ethics - Torture
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Card Sort: Ethics - Torture

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The ethics and morality of torture is a controversial subject which is at the heart of British values. It is proscribed by the Geneva convention and it is illegal to submit evidence to a British court that has been gained through torture. However, the war on terror has placed many of our service men and women in very difficult circumstances where they have had to make decisions which have been questioned by human rights groups. Should the state ever use torture in order to protect the public safety of its citizens against terrorism? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against the use of torture. It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. However, this is a topic which should ideally be delivered by a subject specialists and covered by older students at KS4 or KS5. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organise them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as fourteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Theme: Moral Moral philosophy and ethics Know: What is torture and why is outlawed by the Geneva Convention? Understand: What are the arguments for and against using torture? Evaluate: Are there any circumstances in which is acceptable to use torture? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is torture and why was it outlawed by the Geneva Convention? Explain - the arguments for and against the use of torture? Analyse - Are there any circumstances in which it is acceptable to use torture? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Timeline & Market Place Activity: Neolithic & Bronze Age Britain
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Timeline & Market Place Activity: Neolithic & Bronze Age Britain

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This beautifully illustrated resource was written and produced for the History Academy by the textbook author and artist Andrew Hill. It makes great classroom time line display or can be used as information cards for a market place activity on the Neolithic & Bronze Age Britain. It is a versatile resource which can also be printed off and kept in a folder and used for research by your gifted and talent students. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download two PowerPoints. The first contains the time line resources for Neolithic & Bronze Age Britain and includes pictures, diagrams and information which can be printed off in colour for either display or information cards for a market place activity. The second Powerpoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, tasks and extended writing activities to help support a market place activity. The document is open and can customised for your students. The aims and objectives for this resource are: Theme: Neolithic & Bronze Age Britain Know: What was life like for people living in Britain during this period? Understand: How did they overcome the problems they faced? Evaluate: What changed and what stayed the same in this time period? Skills: Collaboration, Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was life like for people living in Britain at this time? Explain: How did they overcome the problems that they faced? Analyse: What changed and stayed the time in this time period? If you are looking for similar resources then please check out our TES shop. This lesson can also be purchased at a discount as part of a bundled package. If you would like to stay up to date with our latest offerings, then you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time focusing on what really matters to you! Kind Regards Roy
How did the Homesteaders overcome the problems they faced on the Great Plains?
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How did the Homesteaders overcome the problems they faced on the Great Plains?

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This great lesson is designed to help students understand how the Homesteaders overcame the problems they faced on the Great Plains such as water supply, natural hazards, extreme weather, protecting crops, bankruptcy, insects and Native Americans. This lesson includes a 26 slide PowerPoint with six core activities including starter, review summary tasks on the problems, thinking skills review activities, card sort and an exam question. I have also included fourteen illustrated information slides to be used either before or after the card sort activity explaining both the problems facing the Homesteaders and the solutions that they came up with. In addition, the PowerPoint contains aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, pictures, diagrams and templates for summarizing learning. The two page word document contains 14 problems with the solutions that the Homesteaders came up with mixed up. Students cut out the cards and match the problems and solutions under the two headings. Once they have peer reviewed or checked them during a class feedback session, students can then stick them into their books. Alternatively, you could create a class set that are kept in envelops and quickly matched and then put back as a quick starter or plenary. For more information please see the sample preview. The aims and objectives for this activity are: Theme: How successful were the Homesteaders at settling on the Great Plains? Know: What problems did they have to overcome? Understand: How did the Homesteaders survive and build successful farms on the Great Plains? Evaluate: What impact did these solutions have on the Homesteaders, the environment and the Native Americans? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change, Continuity and Source Evaluation. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What problems did the Homesteaders have to overcome in order to survive? Explain: Did they try and solve these problems? Analyze: begin to make an overall judgment on how successful the Homesteaders were at settling on the Great Plains and at what cost? This is a great lesson which, which your students will enjoy. Please check out some of my other resources on the American West or follow the History Academy on You Tube, Facebook or Twitter. Kind Regards Roy
Invaders & Settlers: The Vikings
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Invaders & Settlers: The Vikings

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This lesson is designed as an KS3 introductory module called ‘Invaders and Settlers AD43 - 1066’. It provides an overview of the Viking invasions and their impact on Anglo Saxon England. There is also a focus on the decline and rise again of towns and education, which is a theme which is returned to in other KS3 modules on medieval towns and industrialisation 1750 - 1900. The tasks and activities included in this module are suitable for the full range of ability at KS3 and are designed as a bridge or transition from KS2. One of the activities is on the origin of place names and makes a nice rounding off activity for the theme invaders and settlers, before starting the Norman Conquest. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why was England invaded and settled from 40 AD to 1066? Know: Who were the Vikings and why did they come to Britain? Understand: : How did Alfred the Great defeat the Vikings? Evaluate: What impact did the Vikings invasions have on Britain? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Who were the Vikings and why did they come to Britain? Explain: How did Alfred the Great defeat the Vikings? Analyse: What impact did the Vikings invasions have on Britain? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty five slide PowerPoint Presentation which includes starters, plenaries and a range of interactive resources and activities. These include a snowballing stater, buzz , information slides, the origin of place names, summary tasks, Venn diagrams and links to video clips on the Vikings and their impact on Anglo Saxon England. Everything you need to photocopy is include in the PP> You will need access to You Tube in order to access the video clips. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Life on the Plantation
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Life on the Plantation

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This beautiful crafted lesson has been designed to help students understand the daily challenges facing slaves living on a plantation either in the Carribbean or the southern United States. It is a shocking but engaging lesson that forms part of series on Britain and the Slave Trade . It comes with both a worksheet and a PowerPoint and a wide range of tasks and activities that are suitable for the full ability range. However, I would not recommend teaching this topic to a Year 7 class as it contains some very mature themes. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet as well as a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and differentiated questions on everyday life in the plantation, the treatment of slaves and their punishments. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: What was it like to be sold at auction? Understand: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Evaluate: Why were some slaves treated better than others? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was it like to be sold at auction? Explain: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Analyse: Why were some slaves treated better than others? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?
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Card Sort: What were the differences between the Suffragettes and Suffragists?

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This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying the historical controversies surrounding the campaign to get women the vote in Britain. The women’s movement was split between the peaceful suffragists on the one hand, who made up nearly 80% of women, whilst on the other there were the better known militant suffragettes. The lesson resources have been designed to suit the full spectrum of ability at KS3 and should work alongside any mainstream textbook or resource on this topic. However, I have also included a PowerPoint to accompany the lesson which includes all the necessary background knowledge for the lesson. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a fully editable Microsoft Word document an an accompanying PowerPoint presentation. The Word documents includes aims, instructions, two heading cards labelled ‘Suffragette’ and ‘Suffragist’, along with 20 information cards that can be sorted under one of the two headings. Whilst the PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, information slides, links to appropriate video clips and additional tasks, including an alternative Venn diagram activity comparing the two groups of campaigners. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did some women get the vote in 1918? Know: How were the suffragist and suffragette campaigns different? Understand: Why were their methods and tactics different? Evaluate: Which group was the most effective? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: The differences and similarities between a suffragist and a suffragette? Explain: Why were their methods and tactics different? Analyse: Which organisation was more effective at changing peoples attitudes towards women? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. If you are interested you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Life in the Trenches
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Life in the Trenches

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This is great lesson get your students talking for weeks and doing extra homework projects. This beautifully illustrated resource is designed to help students assess what life in the trenches was like for soldiers in the First World War as well as what the greatest daily dangers or challenges. As you can see from the preview slides, the tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability. This resource is designed to be a standalone lesson, but it can be also used alongside any mainstream text book on this topic. I usually project the slides, tasks and activities on the board, but some of activities can also be printed off and placed around the tables in the classroom. The resource is full editable so you can easily sequence the lesson to suit your students and the context of your school. I usually supplement this resource with relevant clips from Your Tube from films like ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’, ‘War Horse’ and ‘Gallipoli.’ When you purchase this resource you will receive a twenty three slide PowerPoint which includes an optional ‘snowballing’ or a ‘buzz and go starter’. The next section of the PP then includes information slides and activities on life in the trenches including sleeping accommodation, food, mud, trench foot, health and hygiene, body lice, enemy action, shell shock. These are then followed up by a series of consolidation exercises culminating in a thinking skills review triangle. I have also included relevant questions and addition slides with useful templates to use alongside this resource. For more information, please see the preview sample. The aims and objectives for these resources are as follows: Theme: The First World War Know: What was everyday life like for the soldiers in the trenches? Understand: How did they overcome their daily problems? Evaluate: How reliable are the official images of life in the trenches? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How did soldiers cope with everyday life in the trenches? Explain: How did the overcome their daily problems? Analyse: How reliable are the official images of like in the trenches? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on the First World War in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900
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Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

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This great resource has been tried and tested over the past 30 years and has never failed to grab the attention and engage my students. This introductory lesson looks at the causes and consequences of the Transport Revolution in Britain. The worksheet is designed for middle and top set students, whilst the accompanying PowerPoint has a mix of activities to engage the full range of abilities. As with all my activities, they designed to be interactive and promote discussion and develop students thinking skills. They include: A snowballing starter activity of the key words for the lesson Source matching exercise of different transport methods in the 18th Century A self / review activity of the answers Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 400AD to 1700 Heads and tails activity of the causes and consequences of 18th century transport revolution A thinking skills review exercise of which were the most important factors Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 1700 to 1800 The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced Britain’s transport network in 1750? Understand: Why did Britain’s transport network change in the 18th Century? Evaluate: Why were these changes necessary? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing the transport network in 1750? Explain: What pressures were forcing the system to change? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which pressures or causes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Graphic Organisers
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Graphic Organisers

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These graphic organisers can be printed off as worksheets or used on your Interactive Whiteboard for a wide range of subjects and topics to help students analyse sources or compare and contrast ideas.
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate
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Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate

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This literacy resource has been designed to help students to either discuss or debate in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet or cut out. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy