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The History Academy

Average Rating4.81
(based on 208 reviews)

All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Humanities Literacy Mat
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Humanities Literacy Mat

(12)
This literacy mat can be printed off back to back in A3 colour and laminated to use with your students in lesson to help them structure their work using the correct sentence starters and connectives. The literacy mat also includes guidance on spelling, punctuation, structuring paragraphs using PEE and PEEL as well as the correct then, their and they're. This is a must have resource for any humanities teacher.
Graphic Organisers
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Graphic Organisers

(6)
These graphic organisers can be printed off as worksheets or used on your Interactive Whiteboard for a wide range of subjects and topics to help students analyse sources or compare and contrast ideas.
Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900
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Transport Revolution in Britain 1750 - 1900

(6)
This great resource has been tried and tested over the past 30 years and has never failed to grab the attention and engage my students. This introductory lesson looks at the causes and consequences of the Transport Revolution in Britain. The worksheet is designed for middle and top set students, whilst the accompanying PowerPoint has a mix of activities to engage the full range of abilities. As with all my activities, they designed to be interactive and promote discussion and develop students thinking skills. They include: A snowballing starter activity of the key words for the lesson Source matching exercise of different transport methods in the 18th Century A self / review activity of the answers Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 400AD to 1700 Heads and tails activity of the causes and consequences of 18th century transport revolution A thinking skills review exercise of which were the most important factors Map Exercise: What changed / stayed the same 1700 to 1800 The aims and objectives are: Theme: The Transport Revolution 1750 - 1900 Know: What problems faced Britain’s transport network in 1750? Understand: Why did Britain’s transport network change in the 18th Century? Evaluate: Why were these changes necessary? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The problems facing the transport network in 1750? Explain: What pressures were forcing the system to change? Analyse: Begin to come to a judgement on which pressures or causes were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Oracy - Speaking Starters
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Oracy - Speaking Starters

(3)
This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate
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Literacy: A Writing Frame to Discuss / Debate

(3)
This literacy resource has been designed to help students to either discuss or debate in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet or cut out. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Anti-Semitism - The Nazi attack on the Jews 1918 to 1945
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Anti-Semitism - The Nazi attack on the Jews 1918 to 1945

(3)
These resources / unit of work looks at why the Nazi persecution of the Jews became more extreme from 1918 - 1945? The first few chapters look at the status and position of German Jews in 1918 and then moves on to look at the Nazi rise to power and the propaganda, economic, legal, physical attacks on the Jews from 1933 - 1938. Each chapter is designed with revision and summary sections. I have also included some of my Smart Notes with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and summary diagrams to accompany the booklet which you can adapt as you go along. T he next section then looks at the impact of the war on the next stage of the attack on the Jews by looking at the forced segregation and isolation through ghettoes, which was followed by the work of the Einsatgruppen Battalions as the German Army advanced into the USSR. My booklet then asks the question why did the Nazis then decide to move to a 'Final Solution' before moving onto the industrial methods and tactics used to murder the Jews through 'Destruction through work ' and 'special treatment.' The final section or conclusions then explores some of the historical controversy surrounding how far the German people should be blamed for the persecution of the Jews. If I have quoted from a primary or secondary source then full attribution has been given whenever possible. Please note that my resources were written for a British audience so you may want to run them through your US / local spell checker. Some of the key questions or learning outcomes, which these resources explore are listed below: • What impact did the FWW and Treaty of Versailles have on Germany? • How successful was the Weimar Government at bringing economic and political stability to Germany? • What was the status and position of German Jews in 1920? • What impact did the Great Depression have on the support for extremist parties in Weimar Germany? • Why did Hitler become Chancellor of Germany in 1932? • How did Hitler consolidate his power in 1933 – 34? • How did the status and position of Jews change from 1933 – 45? You need to know about: • What rights did German Jews have under the Weimar Constitution? • Why did hatred of the Jews increase from 1919 – 1933? • Why did the Nazis launch a propaganda attack on the Jews? • What impact did the economic attack have on the Jews 1933 – 38? • What impact did the legal attack have on the status and position of Jews living in Germany? • Why did the Nazis launch a physical attack on the Jews in 1938? • What impact did the Second World War have on the Jews in Europe? • Why did the Nazis introduce the Final Solution in 1941? • How did the Nazi regime use industrial methods to persecute the Jews in the Holocaust from 1933 -45?
Oral History: Population Movement 1750 - 1900
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Oral History: Population Movement 1750 - 1900

(6)
This outstanding lesson has been designed to help students studying population movement 1750 - 1900. It had been field tested and refined many times and is a really fun and engaging lesson, which has a really big impact of students. It can be used with the full spectrum of ability as it includes a range of tasks and activities which can be selected in whole or part to suit your students. You will need access to You Tube in order to be able to access the song. When you download this lesson you will be able to access a Microsoft Word document which contains the lyrics to the song ‘Dalesman’s Litany’ and PowerPoint. There is enough work to fully engage a normal class of students for at least one lesson. The PowerPoint facilitates the lesson and includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, a snowballing starter. The next couple of slides set the scene and explains why Britain’s population was on the move. This is followed up by two source activities which could be print off and completed as an investigation or used as part of a class discussion to help set the scene for the main activity. The next slide is a pro and con thinking skills organiser on the problems facing historians when they use oral history as evidence. This could be competed as an activity or as a plenary. I have included a completed version at the end of the presentation. The next activity involves playing the song by clicking on the hyperlink in show mode. I personally would give students a copy of the lyrics to annotate but if you are short on the photocopying budget then you can get around it by getting them in pairs or groups to write down the jobs / places that the person in the folk song has done / lived to help illustrate the impact of the changes on peoples lives… The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Why did Britain have an Industrial Revolution 1750 - 1900? Know: Why was Britain’s population on the move 1750 – 1850? Understand: What factors caused this change? Evaluate: How useful is oral history as evidence about the past? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: Why was Britain’s population of the move? Explain: What factors caused this change? Analyse: How useful is oral history as historical evidence? If you like this lesson then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. I have unloaded this one for free as its my favourite lesson of all time. If you wish you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Treaty of Versailles Dingbats / Revision Cards
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Treaty of Versailles Dingbats / Revision Cards

(5)
These revision flash cards cover all the key factors that you will need to know about the Treaty of Versailles, 1919. If you are looking for a fun, interactive revision game that can be used as a starter or plenary, then this resource for you! It particularly good at injecting a bit of competition which will draw in some of those under achieving students, especially the boys who might be very good at learning key facts via a game. They can also be used by students as revision flash cards. There are three main ways that you can use them. Game 1 involves getting students to read out the key words until the other guesses the topic correctly. Game 2 involves additional challenge and stretch by getting students to describe the topic without using any of the key words on the card. The third game, which adds an additional layer of fun or challenge involves playing a round of Pictionary or Charades. I normally give my students 3 minutes of each round to help activate the learning and warm up the class. You could also have a freestyle round where students decide which game they want to play linked to their learning style. If you are trying to engage some under achieving boys, add some competition and get them to keep score in the back of their books. I would recommend printing them off on card and getting your students to cut them out. Then put the cards into an envelope for class use. If you are a student then keep them in your pocket and use them as a flash card to help you learn the key facts, If there is a term that you do not understand then as your teacher or do some extra research. From a revision perspective, you can print off the cards and get your students to learn the key words for a test or for their exams. These are a win, win resource. The kids will love them and they will help to improve your results. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun using our resources with your students and stay in touch via social media. Kind Regards Roy
Introduction to History Card Game
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Introduction to History Card Game

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Dingbats are a great starter, mini plenary or plenary that can add a bit of fun to any lesson, whilst helping students learn important key words for the lesson. This great resource is designed to help students understand and learn about the different types of evidence that historians use as well introduce them to some of the key words that we use like biased and reliable. The resource has been provided them in Microsoft Word so you can easily adapt them for your own classes. There are three main ways that you can use them. Game 1 involves getting students to read out the key words until the other guesses the topic correctly. Game 2 involves additional challenge and stretch by getting students to describe the topic without using any of the key words on the card. The third game, which adds an additional layer of fun or challenge involves playing a round of Pictionary or Charades. I normally give my students 3 minutes of each round to help activate the learning and warm up the class. You could also have a freestyle round where students decide which game they want to play linked to their learning style. If you are trying to engage some under achieving boys, add some competition and get them to keep score in the back of their books. I would recommend printing them off on card and getting your students to cut them out. Then put the cards into an envelope for class use. If you are a student then keep them in your pocket and use them as a flash card to help you learn the key facts, If there is a term that you do not understand then as your teacher or do some extra research. From a revision perspective, you can print off the cards and get your students to learn the key words for a test or for their exams. These are a win, win resource. The kids will love them and they will help to improve your results. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun using our resources with your students. Kind Regards Roy
Introductory Scheme of Work  for Year 7
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Introductory Scheme of Work for Year 7

(4)
This unit is designed to introduce students to the National Curriculum History as well as measure their existing historical knowledge and skills and set them individual targets for the rest of the term. The first unit sets out classroom expectations and allows for an introduction to the course, whilst the second two units look at the important issues of how historians find out about the past using evidence. The tasks and activities have also been designed specifically to get students to structure their answers using PEE/ PEEL. This will be rigorously reinforced throughout the first half of Year 7 along with next steps peer assessment. This scheme of works well alongside the Heinemann History series as referenced in all the resources. If you like these resources, why not check out my other schemes of work, with lesson resources that I have posted on the TES website. Kind Regards Roy
A FRAME TO RECOUNT A SCHOOL VISIT
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A FRAME TO RECOUNT A SCHOOL VISIT

(1)
These literacy cards are designed to be cut out or used as worksheet to help students write a report or recount of a school visit. As with all the resources in these series, it a must have as it's simple and it works. Have fun and check out some of my other resources. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Anti- Semitism: Nazi Persecution of the Jews 1918 - 1945
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Anti- Semitism: Nazi Persecution of the Jews 1918 - 1945

(0)
These resources / unit of work looks at why the Nazi persecution of the Jews became more extreme from 1918 - 1945? The first few chapters look at the status and position of German Jews in 1918 and then moves on to look at the Nazi rise to power and the propaganda, economic, legal, physical attacks on the Jews from 1933 - 1938. Each chapter is designed with revision and summary sections. I have also included my smart notes with aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and summary diagrams to accompany the booklet which you can adapt as you go along. The next section then looks at the impact of the war on the next stage of the attack on the Jews by looking at the forced segregation and isolation through ghettoes, which was followed by the work of the Einsatgruppen Battalions as the German Army advanced into the USSR. My booklet then asks the question why did the Nazis then decide to move to a 'Final Solution' before moving onto the industrial methods and tactics used to murder the Jews through 'Destruction through work ' and 'special treatment.' The final section or conclusions then explores some of the historical controversy surrounding how far the German people should be blamed for the persecution of the Jews. If I have quoted from a primary or secondary source then full attribution has been given whenever possible. Some of the key questions or learning outcomes, which these resources explore are listed below: • What impact did the FWW and Treaty of Versailles have on Germany? • How successful was the Weimar Government at bringing economic and political stability to Germany? • What was the status and position of German Jews in 1920? • What impact did the Great Depression have on the support for extremist parties in Weimar Germany? • Why did Hitler become Chancellor of Germany in 1932? • How did Hitler consolidate his power in 1933 – 34? • How did the status and position of Jews change from 1933 – 45? You need to know about: • What rights did German Jews have under the Weimar Constitution? • Why did hatred of the Jews increase from 1919 – 1933? • Why did the Nazis launch a propaganda attack on the Jews? • What impact did the economic attack have on the Jews 1933 – 38? • What impact did the legal attack have on the status and position of Jews living in Germany? • Why did the Nazis launch a physical attack on the Jews in 1938? • What impact did the Second World War have on the Jews in Europe? • Why did the Nazis introduce the Final Solution in 1941? • How did the Nazi regime use industrial methods to persecute the Jews in the Holocaust from 1933 -45?
Card Sort: Native American attitudes towards warfare
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Card Sort: Native American attitudes towards warfare

(1)
This great little card sort is designed as a quick kinaesthetic, collaborative exercise, which can be used as either a plenary or mini plenary on this topic. It has been created as part of a series on the American West which can be downloaded from my TES shop. I've also produced an iPad version which can also be downloaded for free on tis topic. when you download this resource, it includes nine key ideas associated with Native American warfare with their definitions mixed up. You could cut these out and keep them in an envelop or just give out this single sheet and give your students 10 minutes to cut them, sort them, peer assess their results and then stick them in their books. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The American West Know: What were the key features and weapons of Native American warfare? Understand: Why did warriors count coup and display feathers and scalps? Evaluate: How did Native American beliefs affect their attitude towards warfare? WILF: What Am I looking For? Identify and describe: The key features of Native American warfare? Explain: Why did warriors count coup and display feathers and scalps? Evaluate: How did Native American beliefs affect their attitude towards warfare? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A writing Frame to Argue
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Literacy: A writing Frame to Argue

(0)
This literacy resource has been designed to help students argue by giving them a series of sentence starters. It can be used in a number of different ways. You can print off the sheets and use them as a worksheet or cut them out as cards. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
How do historians find out about the past?
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How do historians find out about the past?

(1)
This classic first lesson for use with Year 7 at the start of KS3, has been one of the biggest downloads of all time amongst history teachers. It is designed for the full ability range and has been updated into its current format with a few extra tweaks, video links and information slides. This resource can be used alongside pretty much any textbook on this topic and be easily customised for your students. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: How do historians find out about the past? Know: What different types of evidence do historians use? Understand: What is the difference between a primary and secondary source? Evaluate: Evidence and decide whether it is a primary or secondary source? Skills: Source Analysis, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The different types sources that historians use. Explain: The difference between a primary and a secondary source? Analyse: Evidence and decide whether it is a primary or secondary source? The lesson begins with a choice of starters, snowballing or buzz and go. I’ve then linked in some information slides, tasks, activities and video clips about the role of historians and archaeologists. This in then followed up with an explanation of what a primary and secondary source is and finished off with a choice of drag and drop activities from either Medieval or Roman times on Primary V Secondary Evidence. I’ve also included some PEE writing frames as additional tasks to help some classes explain in their own words what a primary or secondary source is. This is designed to be a fun lesson where you outline key historical skills and expectations on how to set work out and write extended answers. If you would like to know more about some of our other resources or just to stay in touch for other updates, then you can visit our TES shop or follow the History Academy on Facebook , Twitter or YouTube. Why reinvent the wheel? Our aim is simple, to produce resources for no more than the price of a good cup of coffee to help support our colleagues who now make resources as part of their full or part time job so that you can spend more time on the things that matter! Kind Regards Roy
Anti-Semitism in Russia 1880 - 1920
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Anti-Semitism in Russia 1880 - 1920

(1)
This worksheet covers the attack on the Jews in Russia 1880 - 1920. It looks specifically at both the anti-Semitic regulations that were passed, pogroms as well as the creation of the Pale Settlement, The final section examines how the Russia Jews responded to these attacks. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Recount / Retell
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Literacy: A Writing Frame to Recount / Retell

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These literacy cards are designed to be cut out or used as worksheet to help students recount or retell a story or event. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy - Why did the Normans build Square Keep Castles? (Persuasive Formal Letter Writing)
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Literacy - Why did the Normans build Square Keep Castles? (Persuasive Formal Letter Writing)

(1)
This outstanding literacy lesson has been designed by experienced history teachers at the History Academy to help students understand why the Normans built Square Keep Castles. It forms part of a series of lessons on why the Normans built castles, which can be downloaded and purchased from our TES Shop or from the bundled link below. However, this lesson will run alongside any main stream resources on Norman castles and can be adapted to suit any similar buildings in your local historical environment. The teaching model for this lesson to at first draw upon students prior knowledge about formal letters, persuasive techniques, Motte & Bailey and Square Keep Castles. The activities in the PowerPoint are designed to build upon this knowledge in preparation for students assessing three different letters that I have included in the pack. These letters should be printed off along with the assessment criteria grid that I have included along with various templates and writing frames for writing formal and persuasive letters. It is always a good idea to ask your English department about what techniques they use with your students for this type of writing exercise so that you can achieve the best results with your students. Once your students have assessed the three letters that I have included, o dubious quality, they can then have a go at drafting their own responses and then finishing them off for homework. These can then be assessed using your whole school marking policy for peer assessment and my assessment criteria grid at the start of the next lesson. They can then have ago at redrafting or typing them up and again finishing them off for homework. The whole thing should take two lessons, but that depends upon how much lesson time you have. Once finished these letters make excellent display work as you can see from the photographs that I have included. I usually get my students to age their letters The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: How did William keep control? Know: What are the literacy rules for writing a formal persuasive letter? Understand: Why did the Normans build Stone Keep Castles? Evaluate: Why did William de Warenne rebuild Conisbrough Castle? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence, Literacy & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The literacy rules for writing a formal persuasive letter Explain: Why did the Normans build Stone Keep Castles? Analyse: Why did William de Warenne rebuild Conisbrough Castle? If you are looking for similar resources then please check out our TES shop. If you would like to stay up to date with our latest offerings, then you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal. Kind Regards Roy
Britain 1750 - 1850 - First Industrial Nation
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Britain 1750 - 1850 - First Industrial Nation

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This outstanding resource is built around the timeless 1990s BBC classic from the series ‘The History File.’ If you are new to the profession, then the basic concept behind the series was to place a young girl called Melanie into a Virtual Reality Museum and let her investigate various history issues. Funny enough technology has now come full circle with the latest VR technology. This is an excellent series, which will engage your most challenging students on those dark rainy days when the wind is howling around the school! This video observation sheet was designed to be used with the episode called 'Britain, First Industrial Nation 1750 - 1850. I have included a link to the official HD version on YouTube. If you are looking for a great way to cover in a fun and engaging way all those difficult industrial statistics, whilst getting over the big ideas on change and continuity from 1750 - 1850 and the move from manufacturing to factory production, then this is the lesson for you. When you download this free resource from the History Academy, you will be able to access a fully editable, three page Microsoft Word document. It contains 15 differentiated tasks that are structured around watching the video and making effective notes. In some sections you might rewind the video and and get you students to actively listen before making their notes. The last task involves getting your students to write up their video notes for homework answering an extended question. If you are interested in splashing out on the price of a cup of coffee to help support our efforts, you could purchase an accompanying SEND PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, tasks and activities to complete alongside the video. It also includes templates from the video observation sheet so that you can summarise your students notes on your IWB as well as templates from the accompanying writing frame to help your students produce an extended piece of writing or essay on the topic. You can purchase these additional resources from: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/send-first-industrial-nation-12132740 The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Industrial Revolution Know: How did Britain change from 1750 to 1850? Understand: Why did Britain change from 1750 to 1850? Evaluate: What changed and what stayed the same from 1750 – 1850? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How Britain changed from 1750 - 1850? Explain: Why did Britain change from 1750 – 1850? Analyse: What impact did muscles to machines have on Britain? Kind Regards Roy
Literacy cards / writing frame to argue
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Literacy cards / writing frame to argue

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This literacy resource has been designed to help students to argue in either a speech or a piece of writing. The cards can either be printed off as a worksheet / writing frame or cut out as pack of literacy cards that can be kept in an envelope. Please check out my other resources covering other key areas of writing from recount, explain, discuss, debate, persuade, speculate and many more.