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The History Academy

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.

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All our resources have been designed and written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on the Facebook or Twitter links.
Card Sort - Comparing Religious Attitudes To Organ Donation
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Card Sort - Comparing Religious Attitudes To Organ Donation

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This fun and interactive resource is designed to help your students understand the different attitudes of Christians and Muslims towards organ donation and transplant surgery. I originally designed this resource for my GCSE RE group as a consolidation exercise to help them produce an extended piece of writing answering a past paper question for Edexcel. However, it can also be used as a starter, plenary or a homework piece of work. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a two page Word document which includes 22 statement cards and 3 heading cards labelled ‘Christian Beliefs’, ‘Muslim Beliefs’ and ‘Non Religious.’ The resource also includes an objective, instructions and an extended writing question on the topic. I usually get my students to either cut out the cards or colour code the heading cards. Once they have fed back their results, we then stick the cards into our books. We then use the finished card sort as the basis for an extended piece of writing. They can then use the card headings as opening points and select statements as their examples for their PEEL’d paragraphs. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Religious attitudes towards surgery Know: Why are some people opposed to organ donation and transplant surgery? Understand: The different religious and non religious attitudes? Evaluate: Which attitudes are Muslim or Christian? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Why some people are opposed to organ donation and transplant surgery? Can You Explain: The different religious and non religious attitudes? Can You Evaluate: What are the differences and similarities between Christian and Muslim attitudes? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. All our contributors are paid the living wage. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?
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Card Sort - Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?

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If you are looking for a great interactive resource that will help your students understand why Parliament won the Civil War then you have found it. This outstanding card sort has been field tested over many years in the classroom and is great for promoting debate, discussion and can be used as a starter, plenary and consolidation activity. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a two page Word document which includes 20 statement cards and 6 heading cards labelled ‘Organisation’, ‘Leadership’, ‘Money’, ‘Support’, ‘Tactics’ and ‘Religion.’ The second page includes a double template for a thinking skills review triangle which can be used to help them decide which factor was the most important. I usually get my students to either cut out the cards or colour code the heading cards. Once them have fed back their results, we then stick the cards into our books and then complete the review triangle. We then use the finished card sort and review triangle as the basis for an extended piece of writing. They can use the card headings for the opening points and selected statements as their examples for their PEEL’d paragraphs. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The English Civil War Know: Why did Parliament win the English Civil War? Understand: What factors helped them win? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Why did Parliament win the English Civil War? Can You Explain: What factors helped them win the English Civil War? Can You Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. We also pay all our contributors the living wage for their work. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roundhead or Cavalier?
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Roundhead or Cavalier?

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This resource has been designed as an SEND resource to help students understand the difference between a Roundhead or Cavalier during the English Civil War 1642 -1660. It can also be used as a homework sheet for other classes When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word document or PDF which includes a hand drawn cartoon showing a Cavalier and Roundhead soldier in 1642. Both soldiers have a speech bubble explaining what they are fighting for. There then follows three activities, which includes drawing or completing a table with statements that summarise their views as well as two questions which seek to consolidate and test students understanding. The aims and objectives are: Theme: English Civil War 1642-1660 •Know: How did people decide which side to choose in 1642? •Understand: What is the difference between a Roundhead and Cavalier? •Evaluate: Why would some people choose not to fight? WILF - What Am I Looking For? • Can You Describe: How people decided which side to choose in 1642? • Can You Explain: What were the differences between a Roundhead or Cavalier? • Can You Evaluate: Why did some people choose not to fight? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources that aim to reward our publishing team the living wage. We only ask for the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - Was Mary, Queen of Scots a threat to Elizabeth and English Protestantism?
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Card Sort - Was Mary, Queen of Scots a threat to Elizabeth and English Protestantism?

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If you are looking for a fun and interactive activity to help your students assess how much of a threat Mary, Queen of Scots posed to Elizabeth I and English Protestantism, then you have found the ideal resource. This card sort can be used as a starter, plenary or consolidation exercise. It can also be set as a homework. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word document with 18 statements that can be sorted under two heading cards. These can be cut out and organised or colour coded depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity. The resource is suitable for the full range of ability from KS2 to KS4, however its always a good idea to make sure you check to make sure the information matches up with what you have taught your students and edit the cards to make sure that they are appropriate for your students. Once my students have fed back their results I usually get them to use the card sort to write an extended answer to the question, ‘Was Mary, Queen of Scots a threat to Elizabeth and English Protestantism’ or to write a speech for one of her advisors arguing whether she should have Mary executed or not. The aims and objectives are: Theme:Elizabeth England 1558 to 1603 •Know: Who was Mary, Queen of Scots? •Understand: Why did the Catholics want her to be Queen of England? •Evaluate: How much of a threat did she pose to Elizabeth and English Protestantism? WILF - What Am I Looking For? • Can You Describe: Who Mary, Queen of Scots was? • Can You Explain: Why English Catholics want her to be queen? • Can You Evaluate: How much of a threat was Mary, Queen of Scots to Elizabeth and English Protestantism? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources that aim to reward our publishing team the living wage. We only ask for the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort - How did the Romans keep control of Britain after AD 43?
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Card Sort - How did the Romans keep control of Britain after AD 43?

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I originally designed this fun and interactive card sort to help my students revise for an assessment on this topic. However, it can also be used as a starter, plenary, consolidation exercise or the frame work for planning for an extended writing or essay on how the Romans kept control of Britain. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word document with 14 statements that can be sorted under three heading cards which are labeled Roman Army, Roman Roads and Roman Entertainment. The resource is suitable for the full range of ability from KS2 to KS4, however its always a good idea to make sure you check to make sure the information matches up with what you have taught your students and edit the cards to make sure that they are appropriate for your students. The aims and objectives are: Theme: Roman Britain Ad 43 - AD 400 •Know: How did the Romans Conquer Britain? •Understand: How did they keep control of Britain from AD 43? •Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? WILF - What Am I Looking For? • Can You Describe: How the Romans conquered Britain? • Can You Explain: How the Romans kept control of Britain after AD 43? • Can You Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources that aim to reward our publishing team the living wage. We only ask for the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Chronology of the Bishops War, 1637 - 1641
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Card Sort: Chronology of the Bishops War, 1637 - 1641

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This fun and interactive card sort is designed to help students understand the key events and chronology of the Bishops Wars 1637 - 1641. The wars were the result of Charles’s endeavour to enforce the English Paryer Book in the Scottish Church and of the determination of the Scots to abolish episcopacy and assert the freedom of their Scottish Kirk, backed up by the Solemn League and Covenant. I originally designed this activity as a starter / plenary for my Sixth Form Students studying the English Civil War, but I have written the information cards so that could be easily accessed by lower ability students at KS3 or KS4. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download single page Word document which includes a learning objective and twenty two cards to be cut out and sorted chronologically. I would advise that students feedback their results before sticking them into their book. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War Know: What happened during the Bishops Wars? Understand: What impact did they have on England and Scotland? Evaluate: Why was Charles I forced to recall Parliament? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What happened during the Bishops Wars? Can You Explain: What impact did they have on England and Scotland? Analyse: Why was Charles I forced to recall Parliament? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Medicine Through Time Flash Revision Cards / Dingbats
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Medicine Through Time Flash Revision Cards / Dingbats

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If you are looking for a fun, interactive revision game that can be used as a starter or plenary then this resource for you. It particularly good at injecting a bit of competition which will draw in some of those under achieving students, especially the boys who might be very good at learning key facts via a game. These revision cards or ‘dingbats’ as we have been designed to cover all the key individuals that you need to know for the new GCSE medicine through time exam board specifications. They make an excellent fun starter, mini plenary or plenary to any lesson. They can also be used by students as revision flash cards. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page, fully editable word document with 24 revision cards and instructions. These particular revision cards were designed for AQA Medicine Through Time, but the content is pretty much the same for other specifications and if you need to you can always tweak the content to suit what you have taught. There are three main ways that you can use these cards. Game 1 involves getting students to read out the key words until the other guesses the topic correctly. Game 2 involves additional challenge and stretch by getting students to describe the topic without using any of the key words on the card. The third game, which adds an additional layer of fun or challenge involves playing a round of Pictionary or Charades. I normally give my students 3 minutes of each round to help activate the learning and warm up the class. You could also have a freestyle round where students decide which game they want to play linked to their learning style. If you are trying to engage some under achieving boys, add some competition and get them to keep score in the back of their books. I would recommend printing them off on card and getting your students to cut them out. Then put the cards into an envelope for class use. If you are a student then keep them in your pocket and use them as a flash card to help you learn the key facts, If there is a term that you do not understand then as your teacher or do some extra research. From a revision perspective, you can print off the cards and get your students to learn the key words for a test or for their exams. These are a win, win resource. The kids will love them and they will help to improve your results. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. I have produced revision cards for all the new GCSE specifications.You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Should the Internet and Social Media be Censored?
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Card Sort: Should the Internet and Social Media be Censored?

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The issue of freedom of speech and censorship continues to be a controversial subject in most democratic societies. Should radical groups be banned from spreading hate on the Internet through Social Media platforms. Should public morally be protected? Should children be shielded from violence and sexually explicit material? Should the government stop terrorist groups using social media to recruit and spread their ideology? How about freedom of speech or the issue of fake news? This outstanding resource has been tried and tested in the classroom over many years and aims to help students understand some of the arguments for and against the use of censorship on the Internet and Social Media It can be used as a starter, plenary or main activity to accompany any main stream text book or resource on this topic. The nature of the task means that it appeals to the full range of ability. The main activity involves getting students to cut out the cards in lesson, organise them into their most persuasive order under the two main headings and then sick them into their books. Once students have fed back their results to a class discussion, they can then have a go at the extended writing activity or add additional ideas from the class discussion. Alternatively, they can create a key and then sort through the cards and then stick the sheet into their book or you could cut out the cards and place them into an envelope for them to sort prior to a discussion on the topic. This is a great resource that can be easily adapted and edited to suit your classroom and expectations. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a single page Word Document which contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards as well as sixteen statements that can sorted. The aims of this lesson / activity are: Know: What is censorship? Understand: What are the arguments for and against censorship of the Internet and Social Media? Evaluate: How far should media be censored in a democratic society? WILF - What am I Looking For? Identify and describe - What is censorship? Explain - the arguments for and against censorship of the Internet and Social Media? Analyse - How far should teh Internet be censored in a democratic society? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more quality time with the people who matter. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Classroom Management - Role Simulation Cards
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Classroom Management - Role Simulation Cards

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This great CPD resource is useful for use in small groups or department meetings to discuss how everyone should respond consistently to challenging student behaviour, based upon the school’s behaviour for learning policy. The scenarios that I have chosen are based upon my experience as senior and middle leader in a challenging school for over 30 years and have been quality assured by several headteachers When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a PowerPoint which can be printed off and cut up to be used as cards for small group work or a market place activity with staff. If you wish you can additional scenarios to reflect particular problems or students in your school. Please see the preview for more information. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
PEEL Classroom Display
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PEEL Classroom Display

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This great resource makes a really effective classroom display to help students structure their answers using PEE or PEEL. It looks great laminated in either A4 or A3. When you your purchase this resource you will be able to download an eight page word document with the letters PEEL and a matching pupil speak explanation to be displayed alongside the relevant letter either alongside or below. Overtime, I train all my students to at whatever level to use PEEL, its a great tool for improving literacy as well as their grades. Once you’ve embedded it you can also get them to peer and self assess their work by writing Point, Example, Explain and Link in the margin of their exercise books. The majority of my written feedback also uses the key words in PEEL. Please see the preview for more information. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort SEND: Was Guy Fawkes Innocent or Guilty?
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Card Sort SEND: Was Guy Fawkes Innocent or Guilty?

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If like me, you love teaching this topic but sometimes find it difficult sorting through the evidence with your SEND and lower ability students, then look no further for help is at hand in this outstanding card sort which simply summaries the evidence into a series of statements that can be sorted under one of two headings. This resource will work along side any mainstream text book, but if you wish you can also download my accompanying worksheet. However, the PowerPoint that I have include comes with everything that you will need. The lesson comes in two sections. The first looks at the traditional story of the Gunpowder Pot as it has been taught to school children for hundreds of years. I have created a series of questions and activities aimed at foundation and core students that helps them to study an old Victorian school history book version. This is a great exercise to help students appreciate how history has been taught in the past. The next section looks a the revisionist version of the Gunpowder Plot and gives students a series of contemporary sources and secondary research by historians to help them decide whether Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty. Once you have reviewed this sources, your students should then be ready to have ago at the card sort . This can be consolidated by getting them to write an extended answer or completing one of the plenary tasks that I have included in the PowerPoint. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document with 19 statements that can be sorted under to heading cards. You will also be able to download a 21 slide PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, questions, historical sources, tasks, activities, templates and writing frames. The aims and objectives are: Theme: What were the consequences of the break with Rome? •Know: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Understand: Why did the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Evaluate: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? WILF - What Am I Looking For? •Identify & describe: What happened during the Gunpowder Plot? •Explain: Why would the Catholics want to murder the King and Parliament? •Analyse: How far does the historical evidence prove that Guy Fawkes was innocent or guilty? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy
What type of a King was Henry II?
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What type of a King was Henry II?

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This fun and engaging has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and produced some brilliant work. It is a great introductory lesson to help set the scene for Henry II’s later conflict with the church and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket. In brief the lesson involves analyzing five historical sources about Henry II, completing a summary table about we can learn from about his personality and then drawing and annotating a picture to help students apply what they have inferred from the evidence This can then be followed up with some more traditional style questions to help consolidate the learning. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a two page worksheet which includes five historical sources, tasks and activities. You can also download an accompanying PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, tasks, activities, templates and links to suitable video links. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why did Henry II fall out with the Archbishop of Canterbury ? Know: Who was Henry II and what type of personality did he have? Understand: How did his personality affect his role as King of England? Evaluate: Sources of information to create an accurate image of Henry II Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The personality and character of Henry II? Explain: How did his personality affect his role as King of England? Analyze: Sources of information to create an accurate image of Henry II If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Source Analysis - Personality & Character of Henry II
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Source Analysis - Personality & Character of Henry II

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This outstanding resources has never failed to capture the imagination of my students and engage them in some outstanding learning. It is a great introductory lesson to help set the scene for Henry II’s later conflict with the church and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket. In brief the lesson involves analysing five historical sources about Henry II, completing a summary table about we can learn from about his personality and then drawing and annotating a picture to help students apply what they have learnt about him. This can then be followed up with some more traditional style questions to help consolidate the learning. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a two page worksheet which includes five historical sources, tasks and activities. You can also download an accompanying PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, tasks, activities, templates and links to suitable video links. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why did Henry II fall out with the Archbishop of Canterbury ? Know: Who was Henry II and what type of personality did he have? Understand: How did his personality affect his role as King of England? Evaluate: Sources of information to create an accurate image of Henry II Skills: Source Analysis WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The personality and character of Henry II? Explain: How did his personality affect his role as King of England? Analyse: Sources of information to create an accurate image of Henry II If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Causes of the English Civil War
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Causes of the English Civil War

8 Resources
This bundle is designed to deliver exceptional value by putting together a selection of our best interactive resources on the causes of the English Civil War. This fun and engaging lessons are designed to get students collaborating, thinking and sharing, but more importantly developing their higher order thinking skills. In terms of differentiation, our market place activities and card sorts are suitable for lower and middle students, whilst our continuum and diamond 9 activities are suitable for providing stretch and challenge for middle and higher ability students. If you like these lessons then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. Here at the History Academy, we love history and are passionate about creating fun and engaging lessons. You can follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that are important to you. Lets face it, teaching is a tough profession, enjoy these resources. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9: Short Term Causes of the English Civil War
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Diamond 9: Short Term Causes of the English Civil War

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This outstanding Diamond 9 lesson has been designed to help students assess the storm term causes of the English Civil War. It has been designed for high ability students, but it could be used to provide stretch and challenge for middle ability students. The aim of a diamond 9 activity is to help develop students higher order thinking skills. If you are looking for something for middle and lower ability students, we have have produced several different versions of this lesson including a Card Sort, Market Place Activity, which can be purchased separately or in a very cost effective bundle which will allow you to differentiate across your low, middle and higher ability groups. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word document and a separate eighteen slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions and nine diamond shaped cards which all include the short term causes of the English Civil War. The PowerPoint includes, aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, writing frames, templates, tasks and activities to help support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview for more information: The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: The Causes of the English Civil War Know: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Understand: What were the short term causes of the English Civil War? Evaluate: Which cause was the most important? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Explain: What were the short term causes of the English civil War? Analyse: Which cause was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Diamond 9 Activity - Long Term Causes of the English Civil War
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Diamond 9 Activity - Long Term Causes of the English Civil War

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This outstanding Diamond 9 lesson has been designed to help students assess the long term causes of the English Civil War. It has been mainly designed for high ability students, but it could be used to provide stretch and challenge for middle ability students. The key aim of a diamond 9 activity is to help develop students higher order thinking skills. If you are looking for something for lower and middle ability students then we have produced several different versions of this resource including a Card Sort, Market Place Activity, which can be purchased separately or in a very cost effective bundle which will allow you to differentiate across your low, middle and higher ability groups. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word document and a separate twenty slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions and nine diamond shaped cards which all include the long term causes of the English Civil War. The PowerPoint includes, aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, writing frames, templates, tasks and activities to help support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview for more information: The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War Know: What were the long term causes of the English Civil War? Understand: What role did politics, religion and economics play in causing the Civil War? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the long term causes of the English Civil War? Explain: What role did politics, religion and economics play I causing the Civil War? Analyse: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Market Place Activity - Short Term Causes of the English Civil War
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Market Place Activity - Short Term Causes of the English Civil War

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This fun and engaging market place activity is just the thing you need to develop your student’s higher order thinking skills on the short term causes of the English Civil War. This lesson has been robustly field tested in the classroom. It is suitable for the full range of ability and to add a bit of additional differentiation, appropriate slides have been ‘Ragged’ and you can also chose from a series of follow up tasks to suit the ability of your students. If you don’t fancy a market place activity, we have a number of different style lessons on this topic you can also download from our TES shop. Once students have worked their way through one of the starters, the market place activity begins by looking at the challenges facing Charles I and setting the scene n 1640. Students can then review one of six information slides on the short term causes of the English Civil War. They can make notes into their exercise books or the summary tables that I have included as templates to be photocopied back to back. Once students have completed the market place activity, they can then use the information that they have sumarised to complete a mind map activity. This can be followed up by completing a priority task in the form of a thinking skills triangle and an extended written answer which could be easily used for assessment. Or if you prefer, your students can use the templates that have also been included to write a speech for the MP John Pym, explaining why he was upset with Charles I in 1642. The choice is yours and this resource includes everything that you will need to look amazing. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a twenty four slide Microsoft PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks, activities, starters, plenaries, information slides and templates to help students summarise their learning. It also includes feedback sheets and a homework task. Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson. Please see the detailed preview which includes most of the slides. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Causes of the English Civil War Know: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Understand: What were the short term causes of the English Civil War? Evaluate: Who was to blame for starting the war? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Explain: What were the short term causes of the English civil War? Analyse: Who was to blame for starting the war? Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Market Place Activity - Long Term Causes of the English Civil War
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Market Place Activity - Long Term Causes of the English Civil War

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This fun and engaging market place activity is just the thing you need energise your students and develop their higher order thinking skills on the long term causes of the English Civil War. This lesson has been crafted by experienced teachers and robustly field tested in the classroom. It is suitable for the full range of ability and to add a bit of additional differentiation, appropriate slides have been ‘Ragged’ and you can chose from a series of follow up activities to suit the ability of your students. Once students have worked their way through one of the starters, the market place activity begins by looking at the challenges facing Charles I and setting the scene n 1640. Students can then review one of six information slides on the long term causes of the English Civil War. They can make notes in their exercise books or into the summary tables that I have included as templates to be photocopied back to back. Once the market place activity has been completed, your students they can use the information that they have downloaded and sumarised into their notes to complete a mind map activity. This can then be followed up by completing a priority task in the form of a thinking skills triangle and an extended written answer. Or if you prefer, your students can use the templates that have been included to write a speech for the MP John Pym, explaining why he was upset with Charles I in 1640. The choice is yours and this resource includes everything that you will need to look amazing. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a twenty four slide Microsoft PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks, activities, starters, plenaries, information slidesand templates to help students summarise their learning. It also includes feedback sheets and a homework task. Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Causes of the English Civil War Know: What were the long term causes of the English Civil War? Understand: Why did Parliament expect to have a say in the running of the country? Evaluate: Who was to blame for starting the English Civil War? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: What were the long term causes of the English Civil War? Explain: Why did Parliament expect to have a say in the running of the country? Analyse: Who was to blame for starting the English Civil War? Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
What were the Short Term causes of the English Civil War?
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What were the Short Term causes of the English Civil War?

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This fun and engaging lesson has been written by experienced teachers to help students understand the short term causes of the English Civil War. The lesson picks up from the end of Charles I’s personal rule and examines in depth the problems that he faced from 1640 - 1642. This lesson has been designed for the full ability range. Where appropriate, key slides have been differentiated for core and foundation students. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download a eighteen slide Microsoft PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, tasks, activities, starters, plenaries, information slides, links to video clips and templates to help students summarise their learning. Once students have worked their way through the starter exercises, they are presented with a number of problems that faced Charles I from 1640 - 1642. These include religious, financial, the growth of Parliament and his beliefs in the divine rights. Once students have reviewed Charles I’s problems using either the core or foundation slide, they then complete one of several different tasks that you can choose from to help them categorised and prioritised them. Moving on swiftly, the next part of the lesson looks at a series of extracts which help to set into context Charles I’s decision to storm into Parliament and arrest Pym and his supporters. This followed up by an activity making notes from the film Cromwell describing what happened next. The lesson then finishes off by students evaluating how Charles responded to events in Londonwhy Charles I declared war both the long and short term causes r and deciding who was to blame who was to blame Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Short Term Causes of the English Civil War Know: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Understand: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1641? Evaluate: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament in 1642? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Explain: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1642? Analyse: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did Charles I storm into Parliament to arrest 5 MPs in 1642?
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Why did Charles I storm into Parliament to arrest 5 MPs in 1642?

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This outstanding lesson has been fined tuned in the classroom to help students understand the short term causes of the English Civil War. The lesson picks up from the events that led to the end of Charles I’s personal rule and the problems that faced him from 1640 and his decision to declare war on Parliament in 1642. This lesson has been designed for the full ability range. Appropriate slides have been differentiated for foundation and core students. When you purchase this lesson, you will be able to download a eighteen slide PowerPoint which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, information slides, pictures, diagrams, video links, tasks, activities and templates to help your students summarise their learning. Once students have worked their way through the starter exercises, they are presented with a number of problems that faced Charles I from 1640 - 1642. These include religious, financial, the growth of Parliament and his beliefs in the divine rights. Once students have reviewed Charles I’s problems using either the core or foundation slide, they then complete one of several different tasks that you can choose from to help them categorised and prioritised them. Moving on swiftly, the next part of the lesson looks at a series of extracts which help to set into context Charles I’s decision to storm into Parliament and arrest Pym and his supporters. This followed up by an activity making notes from the film Cromwell describing what happened next. The lesson then finishes off by students evaluating how Charles responded to events in Londonwhy Charles I declared war both the long and short term causes r and deciding who was to blame who was to blame Please see the detailed preview for further information, but I have included everything that you would need to produce a fun and engaging lesson The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Short Term Causes of the English Civil War Know: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Understand: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1641? Evaluate: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament in 1642? WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What problems faced Charles I in 1641 - 1642? Explain: Why did Charles I storm into Parliament in 1642? Analyse: Why did Charles I declare war on Parliament? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy