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Columbus Day Learning Ideas for Investigation and Discussion

Columbus Day Learning Ideas for Investigation and Discussion

After watching the History Channel video about Christopher Columbus, have students watch the following video and discuss the similarities and differences in the two videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aF_unlvjccA Link to Columbus Day Resource: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/10/11/why-is-columbus-day-still-a-u-s-federal-holiday/?utm_term=.96db7274ccc2
Geoyce411
KS1 Dreamcatchers - Forest School

KS1 Dreamcatchers - Forest School

This was done in Forest School with a Year 2 class (they are half completed in the accompanying photo). We also read "The Crow's Tale" which is a Native legend with a nice moral and lovely pictures. Included are: Detailed Lesson Plan Examples (I printed these and stuck them on card to pass around in the forest) Dream Catcher History (to read to the class) Instructions on how to make a net (We didn't make proper nets with Year 2 but this could be used with older children)
CreativeClass13
Valuing an Ancient Vocation: Lesson Plan & Film

Valuing an Ancient Vocation: Lesson Plan & Film

In this lesson, students watch the short film, "The Last Ice Merchant" by Sandy Patch, which tells the story of Baltazar Ushca who has harvested the glacial ice on the highest altitudes of Mount Chimborazo, the tallest mountain in Ecuador, for over 50 years. Cultural changes in this small indigenous community led his brothers to seek other work, but Baltazar continues on alone, the last ice merchant of Chimborazo. In classroom discussion, students examine an ancient vocation and the impacts of modernization and climate change on an old way of life. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story. English and Spanish versions of the lesson plan are available for download.
Global_Oneness_Project
The Adventures of Sajo and her Beaver People Reading Comprehension

The Adventures of Sajo and her Beaver People Reading Comprehension

In this Canadian classic, you will read about an Ojibwa brother and sister, 11-year old Sajo and 14-year-old Shapian, and their adorable pet beavers, Chilawee and Chikanee. One spring day, Sajo's father rescues two baby beavers from an otter attack and brings them home to their village. After one of the beavers must be traded for food, Sajo and Shapian set off to see if they can buy him back. Travelling by canoe and by train, they face various challenges on their trip to the City. They employ skills they have learned from their Ojibwa elders, and are also helped by a Missionary, American tourists, and an Irish policeman. Written in the style of old-fashioned classics like ‘Heidi’, this original tale by the renowned British-Canadian conservationist known as ‘Grey Owl’ is both informative and touching. Rich and reportedly accurate descriptions of the Eastern Canadian wilderness provide the backdrop to a story of caring people who triumph in their efforts to reunite two baby beavers with their family. Illustrations by the author provide added entertainment, as well as a glossary of Ojibwa terms. The book is divided into 23 chapters. Write your own definitions, answer reading comprehension questions, and research 22 topics (ranging from how otters and beavers hunt and eat, to how elevators and steamboats work). For each of these activities, you may go into great detail, or just scratch the surface – the material is adaptable to different students. Enjoy a trip into the past with a sincere story-teller and lovable characters! Research topics: Jacques Cartier, Ojibwa tea, beaver dams and lodges, how otters hunt, feeding human food to wildlife, Ojibwa/European trade, what beavers eat in the wild, what instinct is, the Hudson’s Bay Company, birch bark canoes, what ‘portage’ means, forest fires, steamboats, who are the Ojibwa, Native American spiritual beliefs, animals in zoos versus in the wild, travelling by train in Canada (in the past), how elevators work, the importance of saying thank you, what bannock is, autumn around the world, how dangerous wolves really are. Bonus! This title includes a set of Canadian Wilderness themed notebooking pages.
canadianwinter
iPad Card Sorts: American West

iPad Card Sorts: American West

These outstanding resources have been written and field tested in the classroom by experienced teachers using the Thinking Kit software for the iPad. These iPad card sorts cover the key topic of the American West and are designed to fun, engaging and used by the full spectrum of learners. To find out more, click on each resource for a full description of its aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and how to use it with your students. If you like these resources then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
iPad Card Sort: What impact did the Gold Rush have on the American West?

iPad Card Sort: What impact did the Gold Rush have on the American West?

This outstanding iPad Card sort is designed to help students studying the impact of the Gold Rush on the American West by looking at the positive and negative consequences affecting both Native Americans and the early settlers. It can be used as a revision activity, preparation for an essay on this topic or as a starter or plenary. It can be used alongside any of the main stream text books on the American West or even my PowerPoint on this topic which can be downloaded via The History Academy TES shop. When you download this resource you will also receive a hard copy of the card sort as well as a PowerPoint with the aims, objectives, instructions, task codes and the password you will need to activate the activity on https://www.thinking-kit.com/. The activity involves sorting sixteen statements by dragging and dropping them onto either the negative or positive consequences headings. Once the initial activity is complete, students can then discuss and feedback their answers before saving them into a PDF version which can be saved, submitted for marking or printed off. You can get your students to extend their answers further by prioritising the negative and positive consequences of the Gold Rush by organising them into their order of importance. Another follow up task might be to get your students to do the exercise again, but from the perspective of the Native Americans to look at a different interpretation. The final result should make an excellent plan for writing an extended answer on this topic. I've also included a hard copy of the card sort in the form of a Microsoft Office Word document as a courtesy, just in case you do not have enough iPads on the day. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Know: What impact did the gold rush have on the West? Understand: What impact did the gold rush have on both Native Americans and settlers. Evaluate: What were the most significant negative and positive consequences? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance and Interpretation WILF: What Am I Looking For: Identify & describe the impact of the gold rush on the USA & the West. Explain the positive and negative impact on both the Native Americans and settlers. Analyse and come to a judgement on who benefitted from the gold rush? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Roy_Huggins
THE PEARL SHELLERS OF THE NORTH WEST COAST OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA - A CHEQUERED  HISTORY

THE PEARL SHELLERS OF THE NORTH WEST COAST OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA - A CHEQUERED HISTORY

Here is a unit that cuts across many areas. It has aspects of environment. It deals with Aboriginal people in the landscape.It mentions the early unfavourable reports of William Dampier. It includes the impact of European pastoralists on Aboriginal culture and survival. It looks at the evolution of pearl shelling collection from Aboriginal gathering to enforced labour of Aboriginal groups to skin diving and finally to deep sea diving using pearl luggers. It is a history of fortunes made by a few and the victimisation of others. It has aspects of racial discrimination and segregation. Take your students on this journey and you will come across a history that happened but one that is not comfortable to relate. There are two sets of attachments to assist. The first set allows your students to see the trials faced by deep sea divers. The second attachments provide question sheets provided in black and white that will test the level of understanding. This is a history, geography, landscape, social issue unit. Part 2 entitled "The Pearl Shellers of Broome 1912" is a reconstruction by maps and photographs of the settlement in the heyday of the Pearl Luggers.
KPolkinghorne
ABORIGINAL AND EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT IN THE COORONG OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

ABORIGINAL AND EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT IN THE COORONG OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Aboriginal groups occupied the Coorong area least 5000 years before European settlers arrived. Unlike most other Aboriginal groups in Australia the Coorong Aboriginal people were able to establish permanent campsites. The main area was at Parnka Point. This study will show the geographical advantage of this location - on the shores of the Coorong; within reach of the lakes; with easy access to the enclosing dunes that would later be named "The Younghusband Peninsula"; and with access to both fresh and salt water environments. The arrival of European settlers (began with Dr. Rankine in 1849) greatly impacted this Aboriginal way of life. Unlike the Aboriginal people who worked within the environment, the European settlers were environment modifiers. They converted natural bush-land into introduced cropland. They introduced new hard-hooved animals (cattle, horses, sheep) on to sensitive sandy areas. These animals damaged fresh water soaks - a major source of fresh water for Aboriginal groups. In addition the unintentional impact of European diseases devastated Aboriginal people. What had been a secure environment for Aboriginal people of the Coorong became untenable as their food gathering resources became restricted. Follow through this history which is, in essence, an example of cultural conflict. This unit is aimed at Secondary levels in Aboriginal Studies; Environmental studies and Geography.
KPolkinghorne
GCSE American West Teaching Resources

GCSE American West Teaching Resources

This is your chance to buy all my outstanding American West resources bundled up for a massive saving. These resources are tried and tested. They are suitable for a wide range of abilities and will successfully engage your students. For more information, click on the resources.
Roy_Huggins
American West Teaching Resources

American West Teaching Resources

This is your chance to buy all my outstanding American West resources bundled up for a massive saving. These resources are tried and tested. They are suitable for a wide range of abilities and will successfully engage your students. For more information, click on the resources.
Roy_Huggins