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MEKONG DELTA SERIES PART 4 - FOUR FUTURE CONCERNS

MEKONG DELTA SERIES PART 4 - FOUR FUTURE CONCERNS

A series of dams have already been built in the upper catchment areas of the Mekong Basin . The largest are within the area of China but other countries (Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Cambodia) have also constructed dams along the main Mekong or on tributaries of the Mekong. More are planned. These dams have both positive and negative consequences. On the positive side they store and control water flow which assist during dry seasons. They have the capacity to reduce the level of flooding in the lower basin. Negative impacts include the displacement of people as river valleys flood behind the walls of the dams in developing lakes. Of greater concern is the siphoning of water away from the Mekong and the reduction of sand/silt flows into the lower basin. In Cambodia the Tonle Sap Lake will reduce in volume and the reverse flows into the lake could cease. This annual reservoir of water which arrives when the Mekong is in flood may not be released into the lower rivers and the delta. Other concerns focus on the rising salinity levels within the waters of the delta which will impact on on crop yields. Global warming is another concern. As sea levels rise the impact of oncoming waves will affect the coastline. Already some coastal areas are retreating inland - although other areas are showing advances seaward. The ecological value of mangroves as buffer zones between the salt water environment and the fresh water distributaries is recognised. The rate of illegal mangrove clearance is a concern. This section covers a local village approach to protect and add to mangrove areas. The unit is summarised with a map and recognition of the top 10 world deltas. Clues are given so that students can cover the activity. A blank world map is provided and if help is needed a completed answer sheet is provided. However, don’t be too eager to use this. Allow your students to work through the clues to see how close they can get to the correct and complete table and world delta placements.
KPolkinghorne
CHINA

CHINA

Locate China on a world map and learn about Chinese facts and traditions. Have a go at Chinese multiplication and learn about a recent Earhquake in China. 2 assemblies also included (a teacher led whole-school assembly AND a class assembly). Why not learn some Tai Chi too ... I’ve attached a simple Tai Chi routine (accompanied by some relaxing music).
mark harland
Countries and Capitals of Asia – puzzle

Countries and Capitals of Asia – puzzle

Countries and Capitals of Asia – puzzle Students should match the countries with their capitals. There are 30 countries and their capitals in the puzzle. Some of the countries are located only partly in Asia. I’ve included three different sizes of the same puzzle. The smaller size is only three pages and is great if you are going to print of individual copies for students to practice in class or at home. The larger size requires 8 pieces of paper and quite a bit of space to solve – fun for centers and group work. The extra-large size requires 24 pieces of paper. Cut out the puzzle pieces (or even better if your students do it themselves) and students are to solve the puzzle so that it matches the solution provided. If your students are going to cut out the pieces then no prep is needed – the puzzle is not in order. I’ve been using these puzzles for years with great success! I recommend printing the puzzles on colourful paper and laminating them. This way you only have to cut them out once and they will last for years! What is included in this product? • The solution to the puzzle – Pages 3 • The normal size puzzle – Pages 4 – 6 • The large size puzzle – Pages 7 – 14 • The extra-large size puzzle – Pages 15-38 • Questions and Answers in a table format for easy grading or you can cut these out to play a matching game – Pages 39 – 41 My students love doing these types of puzzles. This product can also be used as a perfect revision of the school work to do at home. All answers can be easily checked thanks to the included solution to the puzzle or questions and answers shown in a table. Thank you for checking my resources.
NewMathWorld
KS2 Class Assemblies

KS2 Class Assemblies

6 KS2 Class Assemblies: -Dilemmas -The Plague and Great Fire of London -Fantastic Mr. Fox -Iron Man -Teeth and Healthy Eating -7 Continents
mark harland
What is the industry of Japan like?

What is the industry of Japan like?

This is a KS3 lesson taught as part of my Asia SOLAP- focusing upon a country case study of Japan. This lesson focuses upon the key terms necessary for GCSE Geography with regards to trade- and the skills too. The imports and exports of Japan are included-with the task of pupil’s plotting a graph to show these results. A pick and mix plenary is also included.
adamac1
Japan SOLAP

Japan SOLAP

Here is a bundle of eight lessons focusing upon the country of Japan. This bundle includes: - Where is Asia? - Where is Japan located? - What is Japan like? - What is Tokyo like? - How has Japan changed? - What are the ecosystems of Japan? - What is the industry of Japan? - What is the population structure of Japan? All of the resources necessary for the lessons are attached. These lessons have been designed to implement skills needed for Geography GCSE into KS3 such as skills.
adamac1
How is Japan's population structured?

How is Japan's population structured?

This is a KS3 lesson which is taught as part of my Asia SOLAP. This lesson focuses upon the population structure of Japan- with the use of interpreting and describing population pyramids and defining key terms- all of which have been researched accurately. The challenges of Japan’s ageing population are also considered. A 4 mark exam style question is included with a support/framework for the less able/lower literacy skills. A peer assessment comment bank is also included.
adamac1
THE MEKONG DELTA SERIES  - PART 3 TRANSPORT PRESENT AND FUTURE

THE MEKONG DELTA SERIES - PART 3 TRANSPORT PRESENT AND FUTURE

The large bridges spanning the Mekong distributaries are part of the recent developments connecting the delta to to the urban centre of Ho Chi Minh City. Gone are the long queues of cars and trucks waiting at ferry terminals. Trucks, buses and cars now cross the water in numbers that are growing. Traditional methods of transport (animal drawn carts, bicycles and usual walks to local markets remain in the smaller more remote farm areas. In the delta cities and the larger towns mechanised transport is replacing traditional modes. The opening transport network map illustrates changes for the delta. The planned road extensions will remove the isolation experienced in parts of the delta.The rivers will continue to be major highways to the interior. The photographs indicate the variety of transport. The attachment provides an opportunity for students to recognise transport modes and pathways in given situations This unit can standalone supporting examples of transport or it can be used to broaden understanding of the delta when used with the other 3 titles in the series.
KPolkinghorne
What are the ecosystems of Japan?

What are the ecosystems of Japan?

This is a KS3 aimed lesson taught as part of my Asia SOLAP. The lesson focuses upon the temperate deciduous forests of Japan with a particular focus on key words, the location, climate, characteristics and flora and fauna adaptations. Included are relevant videos, map work, a climate graph interpretation question and a quick plenary quiz. All resources necessary are attached.
adamac1
KS3 BRICs- China & India (Population)- 20+ fully resourced lessons PLUS assessments

KS3 BRICs- China & India (Population)- 20+ fully resourced lessons PLUS assessments

This unit is split into two topics- China and India. Both topics cover all of the basics of population needed as preparation for GCSE- Population pyramids, Demographic Transition Model and beginning to link it all to development indicators. Extended writing using structure strips included in the China section- Assess to what extent the China One Child Policy has been successful. End of topic test included which has been made using legacy higher tier exam papers. DIRT lesson included which can easily be adapted and personalised to your own class’ performance. Lesson 9- I don’t do a PPT for this lesson as I get them to build their own favelas! Lesson 4-6 for India is a group project BUT their are clear tasks for all 4 members of the group! Plenty of examples of student work to inspire others and allow them to “magpie”! Lesson 11- Is a revision lesson based on Revision Clocks but I allow students to choose their own method of active revision.
rachelwortley
MEKONG DELTA SERIES - PART 2  LAND USES AND SURVIVAL

MEKONG DELTA SERIES - PART 2 LAND USES AND SURVIVAL

The Mekong delta ranks second in the list of the area of world deltas. The scaled map on the title page provides an opportunity for students to recognise the area (almost 100,000 square kilometres. This unit has a focus on the major land uses which are the basis for the survival of just over 18 million people. The main activity is growing the staple crop of rice. This is carried out by thousands of farming families on small areas. Rice is marketed within the delta but Vietnam is a major exporter of rice. Rice is milled within the delta and moved out of the delta via road to Ho Chi Minh City or by ship from the delta distributaries to overseas markets. Linked with the two large delta urban areas (My Tho over 800,000 population and Can Tho 1.4 million population) are market gardening areas producing a range of fruit and vegetables. These larger urban centres ara also areas of light industry.Vietnam also exports quantities of fish caught in the fresh waters of the distributaries or in the brackish waters of the mangrove swamps. Of particular significance is the raising of shriimp either in the water cannals and ponds of the rice fields or in the saline waters among the mangroves. The attachment is provided to promote class discussion. It could be handed out as a worksheet. This unit can standalone but it is also part of a series which, when completed, will give a broader understanding of this significant area.
KPolkinghorne
How has Japan changed?

How has Japan changed?

This is a KS3 lesson taught as part of my Asia SOLAP. This is based upon a case study of Japan and how the country has changed overtime from a traditional society and way of life to modern Japan. It includes: Recent up to date videos Accurately researched information Well thought out activites: including pupils’ producing a billboard advert to show why people should visit Japan. All resources are included.
adamac1