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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.

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I am a teacher of secondary English, providing resources and lesson plans in this domain. My lessons are on the interdisciplinary side and as such can at times also be applied to other subject areas, such as history or drama. I hope you find them useful! Please don't hesitate to provide constructive feedback as I am always keen to improve my resources and ensure that you get the very best value for money.
Text types revision PPT
AngelilAngelil

Text types revision PPT

(0)
This Powerpoint is most suitable for IB Diploma (Language A) or A Level language and literature students looking to revise text types. The Powerpoint covers the features of the following text types, as well as things that students can look for/consider when analysing an unseen text of this type: News article Editorial Blog or diary entry Political cartoons Graphic novels Brochures and leaflets Forum posts Academic journal articles Reviews Speeches and talks Tweets Letters and emails Interviews Advertisements Infographics The resource also covers reminders of the purposes of writing, the differences between literary and linguistic features, and further tips to enhance performance in analytical tasks of this nature (e.g. commenting on context, planning skills). This is not intended to serve as a full lesson in itself but could potentially be developed by teachers to create one according to the needs of their class. It’s perhaps more appropriate as a revision resource to be distributed for students’ own independent learning.
Comprehension activity - Black Roses (Simon Armitage)
AngelilAngelil

Comprehension activity - Black Roses (Simon Armitage)

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This file consists of 9 questions in relation to poems 4-6 from Simon Armitage’s Black Roses collection. (The questions are repeated twice on one page in the file for easy printing/cutting out/distribution). Students could complete these in small groups or on their own. These were devised for a sixth-form group of EAL students. However, they could be used in KS4 as well (not sure I would recommend for KS3 as the content of the Black Roses collection could be disturbing for children who are too young).
Analysis of speech features: Jamie Oliver/Delia Smith
AngelilAngelil

Analysis of speech features: Jamie Oliver/Delia Smith

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This resource bundle contains 2 video clips (of Jamie Oliver and Delia Smith making a Victoria sponge), a grid for students to fill in with instances of linguistic features such as hedging and fillers, and an answer grid for the teacher. For extension purposes, the grid contains some blank lines for students to fill in any other features they believe they have spotted. The ‘cosmetic surgery or speech feature?’ game is also included along with the lesson plan.
Idioms
AngelilAngelil

Idioms

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This activity has 3 separate parts. After eliciting a class definition of idioms from students, the worksheet requires them to match idioms with their true meanings. Interesting discussion could follow, not just to correct the answers, but to explain how they knew/guessed if they were unsure. Students can then write sentences using the idioms before developing their ideas into a story (more than one idiom could be used in the story - e.g. through dialogue - or one idiom could be developed more thoroughly into a narrative). This was originally made to use with KS3 but could also be used with able KS2s.
Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet
AngelilAngelil

Global Perspectives IGCSE: Individual research planning sheet

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As part of the Global Perspectives IGCSE, students need to undertake a piece of individual research of at least 750 words, accompanied by a practical solution (e.g. film, T-shirts, posters, charity campaign...) that encourages community involvement and cross-cultural evaluation. For some students, particularly EAL/ESL pupils or those with processing/executive function disorders, this can be a daunting task, so a planning sheet is essential (even for those with good planning skills - as many 14-16-year-olds will never have attempted a task of this magnitude). The planning sheet forces students to identify a topic area and refine this into a specific question before writing down their main ideas and considering problems and possible solutions from multiple perspectives (local, global...).
Mental Health History Timeline
AngelilAngelil

Mental Health History Timeline

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Adapted from the resource at http://www.studymore.org.uk/mhhtim.htm, this timeline details the history of mental health from ancient times through to the present day, showing the dates of significant moments such as groundbreaking campaigns, the opening of key mental health units and charities, and the passing of important mental health acts. Can be used as a source of good succinct background information for a project in history, social studies, PSHE/citizenship, science or literature.
Fact sheet: IRA (Irish Republican Army)
AngelilAngelil

Fact sheet: IRA (Irish Republican Army)

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This is a fact sheet about the IRA designed to be distributed to students, or for teachers to use to give them some background knowledge. It has been adapted/created based on Wikipedia so naturally is basic/has limitations, but is suitable for student use and for teachers who are not history specialists. It can be useful for English teachers who are teaching plays or novels where this history is relevant, such as Brian Friel’s “Translations” or Joan Lingard’s “Across The Barricades”.
Personification/anthropomorphism examples PPT
AngelilAngelil

Personification/anthropomorphism examples PPT

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This Powerpoint introduces the etymology of ‘anthropomorphism’ and explains the differences between personification and anthropomorphism. The PPT then showcases examples of texts which use these, before setting students a task to anthropomorphise a classroom object and write a monologue ‘in character’ (students should be familiar with monologue-writing). There is still scope to add additional imagery/animations to the PPT if desired, as well as film clips (e.g. Fantastic Mr Fox, Toy Story, Cars).
Full year's lesson plans: Language and Cultural Context (IB DP English Lang/Lit)
AngelilAngelil

Full year's lesson plans: Language and Cultural Context (IB DP English Lang/Lit)

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PLEASE NOTE: These lesson plans pertain to the ‘old’, outgoing Lang/Lit course (final exams in 2020). While a lot of the material will still be usable in the new course (first exams 2021), please bear this in mind when purchasing and, subsequently, using the plans yourself (whether as written or to make your own). Thanks for your understanding! This file contains at least 50 hours of lessons pertaining to Part 1 (Language and Cultural Context) of the English A: Language and Literature IB program. This would normally last you at least one academic year when taught alongside a minimum of 2 IB set texts (based on a schedule of 4 hours a week at standard level, with a supplementary hour per week at higher level). Topics include spoken language, censorship, translation, metalanguage, and historical and geographical contexts. Texts used include Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Amy Tan’s Mother Tongue, Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time, and Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal. Tasks are differentiated and activities are suggested to support students in TOK and with their extended essay, as well as to support you in the event of your absence from school. Extra resources can be supplied upon request at no extra charge to support you as far as possible. Created by an experienced IB teacher and examiner.
'Bright Star' sonnet (John Keats) - comprehension activities
AngelilAngelil

'Bright Star' sonnet (John Keats) - comprehension activities

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These comprehension questions on John Keats’ Bright Star sonnet were designed for (I)GCSE students studying the poem but could also be used for A Level/IB students. The 4-page pack includes a copy of the poem as well as a vocabulary matching activity, space for handwritten definitions of any other unfamiliar vocabulary, note-taking space, comprehension questions, and an optional extension task.
The Third and Final Continent (Jhumpa Lahiri) - comprehension tasks
AngelilAngelil

The Third and Final Continent (Jhumpa Lahiri) - comprehension tasks

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These comprehension tasks in relation to Jhumpa Lahiri’s short story “The Third and Final Continent” were designed for MA-HA (I)GCSE students. They could be completed in class or alone as short-answer tasks, or used as revision or homework. Alternatively, different questions could be assigned to small groups and developed into a presentation; or, if you would prefer a longer/more detailed answer, individual questions can be set as essays. The questions require students to find evidence from the text to support their answers and focus mainly on cultural contexts and differences, and character development. Multiple copies of the questions fill the page for ease of printing, photocopying and distribution.
Full unit plan: Songs of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Songs of Ourselves (Cambridge IGCSE)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit explores a variety of poetry from the 1500s to the present day. It examines several aspects of poetry, including specialist structures, rhythm, rhyme and meter, as well as techniques common to several types of literature, including personification, alliteration, and onomatopoeia. An effort is made in the unit to encourage text-to-self, text-to-world, and text-to-text connections in the pupils' readings. Contextual information about the lives of the poets studied is introduced as and when it is relevant, as opposed to systematically. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. Their studies of poetry culminate in the production of a piece of official coursework – an essay addressing a key theme across several poems studied. The unit was designed for students studying the Cambridge IGCSE in World Literature, but could easily adapted for (I)GCSE, IB or A-Level students studying the same poems. The poems for which there are lesson plans in this unit are as follows: Futility (Wilfred Owen) The Death Bed (Siegfried Sassoon) First March (Ivor Gurney) Last Sonnet (John Keats) If thou must love me (Elizabeth Barrett Browning) lion heart (Amanda Chong) I years had been from home (Emily Dickinson) Homecoming (Lenrie Peters) The Border-Builder (Carol Rumens) Rhyme of the Dead Self (ARD Fairburn) The Caged Skylark (Gerard Manley Hopkins) Song (George Szirtes) The Road (Nancy Cato)
The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas
AngelilAngelil

The Sound of Waves - key quotes and ideas

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These notes on The Sound of Waves list potentially useful quotations from each chapter through the themes of innocence and experience (I have taught this text once privately and my student’s essay was based on this idea, so I read and made notes on the text with a view to helping her with this). Using the prism of these universal themes enables connections to be made between other curriculum texts, such as the poetry of William Blake and the plays of William Shakespeare. The notes are aimed at teachers (rather than students) and do not constitute full lesson plans in themselves but serve to provide inspiration for lessons depending on what skills and topics you hope to teach when instructing students on the novel. They provide opportunities to help students understand the effects of techniques such as simile and metaphor, foreshadowing, personification, pathetic fallacy, and symbolism. The notes also make links to critical thinking courses such as TOK (Theory of Knowledge) so can also be used by IB teachers to facilitate links to the Diploma core. Obviously all ideas presented in the notes are interpretations which you may agree or disagree with. Nonetheless, I hope they help!
Literary and linguistic techniques matching game
AngelilAngelil

Literary and linguistic techniques matching game

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This literary and linguistic techniques matching game could be printed, laminated and cut out so that students can use it kinaesthetically (which is how I used it) or distributed as a worksheet where students just draw lines between the terms and their definitions (but you would need to mix up the definitions in the document first!). It was designed for IGCSE students but could be used throughout secondary depending on your students’ abilities. It includes literary devices such as flashbacks, as well as linguistic devices such as complex sentences. Great as a starter or plenary activity, or for revision.
The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions
AngelilAngelil

The Moving Finger (Edith Wharton) - comprehension questions

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These comprehension questions were designed for use by MA-HA (I)GCSE students reading Edith Wharton’s short story “The Moving Finger”. These questions could be completed all in one go after reading the whole story (perhaps as homework) or could be completed after reading each part (maybe as a class activity). The questions encourage students to consider how characters are developed and evolve, as well as their overall significance to the story, using evidence from the text to support their ideas. As such these could also be used as stimuli for essays or presentations (as opposed to short answers). The final question could be done as an extension activity in writing and/or the quotation given to all students as a starter or plenary activity.
The Open Boat (Stephen Crane) - techniques worksheet
AngelilAngelil

The Open Boat (Stephen Crane) - techniques worksheet

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This worksheet covers techniques used in parts 1 and 2 of Stephen Crane’s short story “The Open Boat”. It was designed for MA-HA (I)GCSE students. Students are encouraged to match literary and linguistic techniques with their definitions before filling out a table that shows they can identify these techniques being used within the text, as well as finding quotations to support them. A third column is included in the table by way of extension, with students being asked to explain the effect this has if they can.
Blackberrying (Sylvia Plath) - literary and linguistic techniques
AngelilAngelil

Blackberrying (Sylvia Plath) - literary and linguistic techniques

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This worksheet/activity is designed to follow on from a lesson covering the poem’s content. Once students have understood its content, the sheet can be used. The first task encourages students to match techniques found in the poem with definitions. (Students can also find examples from the poem once they are done.) Suggested follow-up activities, mentioned on the sheet, include inviting students to guess information about the poem’s time period and author, and asking students to explain why the literary/linguistic techniques are used (with sentence stems included to start them off). Aimed at MA-HA KS3 but could also be used with KS4.
Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)
AngelilAngelil

Full unit plan: Hedda Gabler (Henrik Ibsen)

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This 16-lesson (4-week) unit plan for Henrik Ibsen's play, Hedda Gabler, explores characterisation, setting, themes, techniques, and text-to-self connections, as well as theatrical movements and practitioners and the influence of these on the play, and is enhanced by the contrasting cultures of production and reception via study of historical context. Pupils consider the links between style, context, content and purpose. They devise their own adaptation of the play to form a 1-hour staged reading of the production.
The Caged Skylark (Gerard Manley Hopkins) - worksheet
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The Caged Skylark (Gerard Manley Hopkins) - worksheet

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This worksheet was designed for use by MA-HA (I)GCSE students learning about Hopkins’ poem “The Caged Skylark”. The grid on the sheet encourages them to identify techniques and imagery used to compare the man and skylark, and to cite examples using line numbers. There is also room for students to expand upon their observations, which could be used as extension. This activity could be completed in groups or alone in class, used as homework, or completed for revision.
Questions about obesity (Global Perspectives/Social Studies/PSHE)
AngelilAngelil

Questions about obesity (Global Perspectives/Social Studies/PSHE)

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The attached questions about obesity can be used in social studies, PSHE and Global Perspectives lessons to explore the themes of the human body, health and disease. The questions encourage students to consider how society influences how we see overweight people, to identify the differences between underweight/healthy/overweight/obese/morbidly obese, to question whether someone can be healthy and overweight, to explain why we need fat in our bodies, and to research hereditary disorders such as Prader-Willi and Cushing's syndromes. All tasks could be completed by all students, or you could divide students into groups and give each group a different question which they then research/consider more thoroughly.