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The History Academy

Average Rating4.75
(based on 211 reviews)

All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.

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All our resources have been written to a high standard and fine tuned in the classroom. Our goal is to share best practice at an affordable price so that you can spend time focusing on your own priorities. During my 30 years in the classroom, I have published resources for Heinemann, Pearsons, Hodder, Folens, BBC and Boardworks. If you would like to receive updates, create your own customised bundle or join our team, then follow us on our Facebook page.
Life on the Plantation
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Life on the Plantation

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This beautiful crafted lesson has been designed to help students understand the daily challenges facing slaves living on a plantation either in the Carribbean or the southern United States. It is a shocking but engaging lesson that forms part of series on Britain and the Slave Trade . It comes with both a worksheet and a PowerPoint and a wide range of tasks and activities that are suitable for the full ability range. However, I would not recommend teaching this topic to a Year 7 class as it contains some very mature themes. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet as well as a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and differentiated questions on everyday life in the plantation, the treatment of slaves and their punishments. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: What was it like to be sold at auction? Understand: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Evaluate: Why were some slaves treated better than others? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was it like to be sold at auction? Explain: How were slaves treated on the plantation? Analyse: Why were some slaves treated better than others? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?
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Why did people believe in witchcraft in the Seventeenth Century?

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These outstanding resources look at why people believed in witches in the seventeenth century and why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts. They are beautifully designed and differentiated for the full range of ability. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page Microsoft Word Document and an accompanying seventeen slide PowerPoint which includes information, sources, links to video clips, starters, plenaries, questions and differentiated tasks and activities. The lesson begins with a choice of starters including a snowballing activity of the key words, a buzz and go squares activity or a source analysis of witches selling their souls in return for magical powers. It then moves on to explain why people believed in witches and the social, political and economic reasons for an increase in suspicion and fear which helped to fuel an increase in witch hunting during this period. The lesson looks at how witches were identified and which groups of people were unfairly persecuted and used as a scapegoat for problems at the time. Both resources include a range of different questions and activities which can be printed off and used with your students. The PowerPoint includes further differentiation and support material for students. These tasks and activities include source analysis questions, as well as a thinking skills review activity to extend the more able which could be used in tandem with a heads and tails activity for the less able. The lesson rounds off with an optional extended question. If you like this lesson, then you might be interested in buying the follow up lesson on ‘How Fair Were Witch Trials?’ which can be purchased separately or as a bundled resource. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Know: Why did people believe in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries? Understand: Why did people hunt for witches? Evaluate: Why were certain people persecuted? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why people believed in witches in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Explain: Why there was an increase in the number of witch hunts? Analyse: Why were certain people persecuted? If you like these resources then why not check out my TES shop. Everything that is uploaded to the History Academy has been field tested and carefully refined in the classroom by experienced teachers. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did the USA drop the atomic bomb on Japan?
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Why did the USA drop the atomic bomb on Japan?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students looking in depth at the historical controversy over President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan in 1945. At the time the USA claimed that the decision to drop the bomb on Japan was based on military factors. This resources presents students with the primary, secondary and key information to compare this interpretation with three others including to scare the USSR, test the weapon, revenge for Pear Harbor and come to a balanced independent conclusion. The resources and text level would suit a middle to upper ability group and could be used as a class or extended homework based resource. There is enough work and activity to last between 3/4 lessons for a middle ability class. This is a depth study which allows students to weigh up the evidence, compare sources and come to a reasoned assessment which form the basis for an essay. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a beautifully illustrated twenty six slide Microsoft PowerPoint presentation and a 6 page Microsoft Word document with thirteen primary and secondary sources, a source summary sheet and an enquiry question. The PowerPoint includes information slides, video clip links, pictures, seven activities, starters, plenaries, primary and secondary sources covering all the different interpretations. For further informations, please refer to the preview panel where I have uploaded all the slides for you to view. The aims and objectives of this depth study are: Theme: Why did the USA drop two atomic bombs on Japan in 1945? Know: Why did Japan surrender in August 1945? Understand: What role did the atomic bomb play in Japan’s defeat? Evaluate: Why did President Truman decide to use the atomic bomb? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: At least two possible reasons why the Americans decided to drop the bomb in 1945. Explain: Why historians disagree with the official explanation given by President Truman in 1945. Analyse: Come to a balanced conclusion on why Truman dropped the bomb. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage
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Transatlantic Slave Trade: Middle Passage

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students studying the ‘Middle Passage’ as part of the transatlantic slave trade. The resource can easily be adapted for display purposes but it is designed to be used as a collaborative source investigation. It can also be used as a market place activity. This beautifully illustrated resource is a must have for anyone teaching this topic. The tasks and activities have been written to appeal to the full spectrum of ability and have been set up around the market place activity where the key slides in the PP are printed off and either pinned on the classroom walls or set out on the tables so that students move around and fill in their information on the summary sheet. Alternatively, the sources are supplied in a booklet format so that each table can investigate a heading before sharing what they have learnt with other groups and the rest of the class. This is a very proactive lesson designed to get students up, moving around, sharing and working collaboratively. I have provided additional differentiation by ‘ragging’ or grading the difficulty of the sources so that the learners can chose their level of challenge. When you purchase this resource you will receive a 18 slide presentation, which includes a snowballing starter, information slides for the market place activity and a plenary. The sources for the market place activity looks at the treatment of slaves and their conditions onboard the slave ship. I have also included a few links to relevant clips on the internet that have been carefully selected. In addition to the PP you will also be able to download a source booklet, a lesson plan and a source summary sheet. The aims and objectives for these resources are: Theme: The Transatlantic Slave Trade Know: What was the slave trade? Understand: How were slaves treated during the ‘Middle Passage’? Skills: Enquiry, Source Analysis and Team Work WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: How the slave trade worked from Africa to America Explain: How were the slaves treated during the ‘The Middle Passage’? Analyse: How reliable is the evidence? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Home Front: The Blitz
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The Home Front: The Blitz

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This outstanding lesson is designed to help students understand why Hitler launched the Blitz on Britain, the impact it had on civilians, whilst evaluating how close it came to breaking morale. In forms part of a series of lessons on the Home Front that can be downloaded separately or bought as part of a discounted bundle. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a four page worksheet with the key information, sources and tasks, one of which includes writing a report evaluating the impact of the Blitz on London. You will also be able to download an accompanying PowerPoint, which includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes and tasks as well as starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources, graphic organisers, video clips and home work tasks. The PowerPoint also includes a living graph / continuum which can be used to evaluate the sources and how far the Blitz was successful at damaging morale. If you stop the show mode, you should be able to drag and drop the sources onto the continuum. For additional information, please view the preview files: The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Home Front Know: Why did Hitler launch the Blitz against Britain? Understand: What impact did the Blitz have on civilians? Evaluate: How successfully did the government prepare Britain for war? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Hitler launch the Blitz? Explain: What impact did the Blitz have on civilians? Analyse: How successfully did the government prepare Britain for war? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Hadrian's Wall
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Hadrian's Wall

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This resource works really well as a follow up to my other resource son the Roman Army. It looks at the reasons why the Emperor decided to build a wall separating Britons from the barbarians as well as how it was designed and built. There is also a section on everyday life on the wall including toilets and bath houses. The tasks and activities are designed for levels of ability and include DART strategies for SEN as well as questions and answers for the more able. The last activity is a word search which can easily be copied to another document and printed off for homework. If you have purchased this resource in the past, I have recently uploaded a new PowerPoint to accompany the main worksheet. Both resources include information, historical sources, tasks and activities. However, the PowerPoint also includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters and plenaries. The aims of the first lesson are: Know: How Hadrian’s Wall was built and designed? Understand: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: Hadrian Wall’s defences? Can You Explain: Why the Romans built Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Evaluate: How effective were Hadrian Wall’s defences? Whilst the aims of the much shorter second lesson, which could be set as a homework are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Understand: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Can You Describe: What was everyday life like for a soldier on Hadrian’s Wall? Can You Explain: How the soldiers kept themselves clean? Can You Evaluate: How comfortable were the lives of Roman soldiers? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Slave Resistance
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Slave Resistance

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This outstanding lesson on slave resistance looks at the different ways in which Black people challenged slavery. It also tries to answer the difficult question about why some people did not try and run away by contextualising the learning and looking at the experiences of former veterans and prisoners who have struggled to cope with adjusting to an unstructured life of freedom. Unlike other resources on this topic, this lesson also looks at the contrasting experiences of Black people in the USA, Jamaica and Haiti and how they had to adjust the way in which they resisted slavery to suit the problems and different challenges they faced. Finally, this lesson poses the question, how successful was slave resistance and links it’s importance to the abolition debate. Did you know that more British soldiers died trying to maintain slavery in the Caribbean, than died fighting to free Europe from Napoleon? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a three page worksheet as well as a twenty four slide PowerPoint Presentation. The worksheet includes detailed information, historical sources and questions that are designed to help students understand the key ideas whist preparing them for an extended question. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes as well as a variety of starters, plenaries, information slides, historical sources,video clips, tasks and additional differentiated activities to help support the lesson. These have been organised in such a way that that they can be used alongside the worksheet. For more information, please see the detailed preview. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: How did Black people try and resist slavery? Understand: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Evaluate: How successful was slave resistance? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF - What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: the different ways in which black people tried to resist? Explain: What is the difference between active and passive resistance? Analyse: How successful was Black peoples resistance against slavery? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
The Christmas Truce, 1914
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The Christmas Truce, 1914

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These outstanding resources on the Christmas Truce in 1914 are a great lesson no matter the time of year, but they make a particularly moving, touching and inspirational end to the long Autumn Term on the meaning of Christmas. I've provided two resources with this lesson. They can be used in any subject across the curriculum. This topic links to History, Music, RE, PSCHE, English, Drama and Music. The first resource is a worksheet with a series of activities aimed to support a wide spectrum of learners. I've built in extension tasks as well as DART strategies for the less able. The PowerPoint is designed to primarily to support the delivery of the worksheet, but includes the aims and objectives, a snowballing starter for pair and share, differentiated questions for different groups, historical sources and diagrams to help illustrate core ideas as well as carefully selected video and music clips. This is one of my favourite lessons and I am confident that it will quickly become yours as well. Treat yourself to good lesson, avoid the painful Christmas videos at the end of term and create a memorable educational moment in time for your students with this truly inspirational story. You will learn: Theme: What is the meaning of Christmas? Know: What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Understand: Why did the British and German troops hold an unofficial truce? Evaluate: Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Source Analysis, Evaluation and Judgement. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify = What happened during the Christmas Truce in 1914? Describe = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Explain = Why the British and German soldiers held an unofficial truce in 1914? Analyse= Why wasn’t there a Christmas truce in 1915? The best documentary to watch on this - rather than a Christmas video is: Days that shook the World – The Christmas Truce. See your history department for a copy. If they are worth their salt they will have a copy! I am offering these resources at a knock down price - for a cup of coffee. I was recently made redundant by a multi-academy trust because I was the union rep. If you like my resources then check out the rest on my TES shop or if you fancy a chat about any of my resources or simply want to be kept updated, then you can follow the The History Academy on Twitter, Facebook or You Tube. Anyway, have fun and whatever time of year it is - Peace and Goodwill to all Men and Women. Please help to keep alive the spirit of the Christmas Truce, 1914. Kind Regards Roy https://www.facebook.com/TheHistoryAcademy/
Why did the Roman Empire collapse?
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Why did the Roman Empire collapse?

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This outstanding lesson has been refined and field tested by experienced teachers. It is designed to help students assess which factors played a crucial role in the collapse of the Roman Empire. This resource is suitable for the full ability range and is a great way of rounding of a course with a fun and engaging activity which can be used as the focus for an assessment or extended piece of writing. The lesson opens with either a snowballing or buzz and go starter. It then sets the scene for the decline of the Empire and looks at the roles played by internal civil wars, climate change, inflation, declining population, the Roman Army and the Barbarian invasions, in it’s final collapse. This is then followed up with a card sort activity and a possible thinking skills review triangle which can then be used by students to help write an extended piece of writing. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page word document and as well as a thirteen slide PowerPoint. The worksheet includes aims, instructions, six heading cards and fourteen statements that can be sorted under them as part of the main activity. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, information slides, historical sources to support the lesson. Please see the detailed preview that I have uploaded. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: The Roman Empire Know: Why factors caused the collapse of the Roman Empire? Understand: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Empire? Evaluate: Which factor was the most important? Skills: Change & Continuity, Source Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The different factors which caused the collapse of the Empire Explain: Why were the Barbarians forced to migrate into the Roman Empire? Analyse: Which factor was the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Revision Cards / Dingbats: German Unification 1815 - 1871
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Revision Cards / Dingbats: German Unification 1815 - 1871

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These revision flash cards cover all the key factors that you will need to know about German Unification 1815 - 1871 for AS or A Level. If you are looking for a fun, interactive revision game that can be used as a starter or plenary, then this resource for you! It particularly good at injecting a bit of competition which will draw in some of those under achieving students, especially the boys who might be very good at learning key facts via a game. They can also be used by students as revision flash cards. There are three main ways that you can use them. Game 1 involves getting students to read out the key words until the other guesses the topic correctly. Game 2 involves additional challenge and stretch by getting students to describe the topic without using any of the key words on the card. The third game, which adds an additional layer of fun or challenge involves playing a round of Pictionary or Charades. I normally give my students 3 minutes of each round to help activate the learning and warm up the class. You could also have a freestyle round where students decide which game they want to play linked to their learning style. If you are trying to engage some under achieving boys, add some competition and get them to keep score in the back of their books. I would recommend printing them off on card and getting your students to cut them out. Then put the cards into an envelope for class use. If you are a student then keep them in your pocket and use them as a flash card to help you learn the key facts, If there is a term that you do not understand then as your teacher or do some extra research. From a revision perspective, you can print off the cards and get your students to learn the key words for a test or for their exams. These are a win, win resource. The kids will love them and they will help to improve your results. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun using our resources with your students and stay in touch via social media. Kind Regards Roy
Invaders and Settlers: Roman Britain
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Invaders and Settlers: Roman Britain

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This lesson is designed as an introduction to a KS3 module called ‘Invaders and Settlers AD43 - 1066’ and provides a quick overview of the impact of the Roman invasion of Britain. However, many of the tasks and activities are also suitable for primary students in KS2 . If you are looking from a KS3 perspective, this lesson sets out the broad context of the Roman invasion and in particular focuses on trade and the growth of towns. This theme is returned to in the other modules which can be downloaded either separately or as a bundle on the Saxons and Vikings links to latter lessons at KS3 on medieval towns and industustrialisation 1750 - 1900. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why was England invaded and settled from 40AD to 1066? Know: Who were the Romans, Saxons, Vikings & Normans? Understand: Why did people want to settle or invade Britain? Evaluate: Who were the British? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Who were the Romans, Saxons, Vikings & Normans? Explain: Why did people want to settle or invade Britain? Analyse: Who were the British? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty slide PowerPoint Presentation which includes starters, plenaries and a range of interactive resources and activities. These include a snowballing stater, buzz and go, time line activity with questions, a map exercise on why would people want to invade Britain, a video note taking task around a specially created clip to go with this lesson on You Tube and a Venn diagram activity comparing a Roman soldier with a Celtic warrior. If you wish to know more then please click on the preview. Everything you need to photocopy is include in the PP, the relevant video clip has been hyperlinked and is also included in the preview which accompanies this resource. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Card Sort: Abolitionists V Supporters of the Slave Trade 1787- 1807
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Card Sort: Abolitionists V Supporters of the Slave Trade 1787- 1807

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This outstanding lesson has been designed by experienced teachers and exhaustively field tested to help students understand the debate over the abolition of the Slave Trade 1787 - 1807. It is suitable for the full ability range and designed to be a fun and engaging lesson that can used to launch into a number of different areas on Britain and the Slave Trade. The core task revolves around students sorting a series of statements or summaries of arguments put forward by both sides of the debate. The accompanying PowerPoint has been designed to provided to help facilitate the lesson, set the scene and provide a range of activities to help deepen and extend your students understanding of the debate. When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download two documents. The first is a two page Word Document which includes aims, instructions, two heading cards and twenty two cards to be sorted under them. Normally when I teach this lesson, I give out the first page and depending upon the ability of the class or the progress that they making, I then give out the second page. to help extend the more able. The second resource is a thirteen slide PowerPoint presentation which has been designed to help facilitate the lesson. It includes starters, plenaries, information slides, links to appropriate video clips and additional activities that could be used to support your students including a source analysis question. For more information please see the detailed preview which includes screen shots of all the slides. The aims and objectives of the lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade Know: What was an Abolitionist? Understand: What arguments were put forward by Abolitionists? Evaluate: Why were some people opposed to abolishing the Slave Trade? Skills: Source Analysis, Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: What was an Abolitionist? Explain: What arguments were put forward by Abolitionists? Analyse: Why were some people opposed to abolishing the Slave Trade? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Why did President Truman decide to drop the atomic bomb on Japan in 1945?
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Why did President Truman decide to drop the atomic bomb on Japan in 1945?

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This outstanding resource has been designed to help students looking in depth at the historical controversy over President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan in 1945. At the time the USA claimed that the decision to drop the bomb on Japan was based on military factors. This resources presents students with the primary, secondary and key information to compare this interpretation with three others including to scare the USSR, test the weapon, revenge for Pear Harbor and come to a balanced independent conclusion. The resources and text level would suit a middle to upper ability group and could be used as a class or extended homework based resource. There is enough work and activity to last between 3/4 lessons for a middle ability class. This is a depth study which allows students to weigh up the evidence, compare sources and come to a reasoned assessment which form the basis for an essay. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a beautifully illustrated twenty six slide Microsoft PowerPoint presentation and a 6 page Microsoft Word document with thirteen primary and secondary sources, a source summary sheet and an enquiry question. The PowerPoint includes information slides, video clip links, pictures, seven activities, starters, plenaries, primary and secondary sources covering all the different interpretations. For further informations, please refer to the preview panel where I have uploaded all the slides for you to view. The aims and objectives of this depth study are: Theme: Why did the USA drop two atomic bombs on Japan in 1945? Know: Why did Japan surrender in August 1945? Understand: What role did the atomic bomb play in Japan’s defeat? Evaluate: Why did President Truman decide to use the atomic bomb? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify and describe: At least two possible reasons why the Americans decided to drop the bomb in 1945. Explain: Why historians disagree with the official explanation given by President Truman in 1945. Analyse: Come to a balanced conclusion on why Truman dropped the bomb. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Coal Mining 1750 - 1900
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Coal Mining 1750 - 1900

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These award winning resources, will simply take your breath away. They look in depth at the problems facing coal miners and the solutions that they came up with from 1750 - 1900. The PowerPoint includes the aims and objectives, information slides, eight activities, an assessment, pupil mark scheme and three outstanding video clips from interviews with Doncaster coal miners that I created as part of an oral history project. The worksheet can be used along side the PowerPoint, but contains and additional four differentiated activities for lower ability students. Meanwhile, the card sort exercise is designed as a mini plenary to help you assess what your students have learnt so far in preparation or the assessment task. The aims and objectives are: Theme: How did the steam engine revolutionise industry? Know: What changes took place in the coal mining industry 1750 - 1850? Understand: How the new methods increased coal production? Evaluate: How did the steam engine revolutionise mining production? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Significance, Evaluation and Judgement. What Am I Looking For this lesson? Identify = the changes that took place in the coal mining industry. Describe = the changes that took place in the coal mining industry. Explain = how the new machinery and steam engines improved coal production? Analyse = form a judgement how far the steam engine revolutionized coal production? In 2011, I was awarded a teaching award for the oral history resources and interactive content that I developed for these lesson resources, which you can download for a bargain price! Activity 1: A Snowballing Exercise Activity 2: Produce a spider graph summarising the problems facing miner using a clip from worst jobs in history Activity 3: Class Feedback and review of what has been learnt Activity 4: Jot down five facts about surviving a rood collapse in a coal mine Activity 5: Guess my job Activity 6: Card Sort Activity 7: Class discussion: How far did the steam engine solve the problems facing miners Activity 8: Spider Summary Activity 9: Assessment with student mark scheme. Have fun - these resources should span 2/3 lessons but can easily be adapted. Kind Regards Roy
How to cope with exam stress?
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How to cope with exam stress?

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This great resource has been designed to help students identify what causes stress and how to successfully manage it through a variety of strategies. Strategically it could form an important part of a whole school health and wellbeing drive to support students and could be delivered in bespoke PSE lessons or during form tutor time. When you purchase this resource you be able to download a 32 page PowerPoint which includes a wide range of starters, plenaries and activities to help students fulfil the lesson objectives below: Theme: Health and Wellbeing at school • Know: What are the causes of stress and its effects on your body? • Understand: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Evaluate: Which strategies are the most effective for you? WILF – What Am I Looking For? • Identify & describe: The causes and effects of stress on your body? • Explain: What strategies can you use to cope with exam stress? • Analyse: Which strategies are the most effective for you? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Market Place Activity: Britain and the Slave Trade 1555 - 1833
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Market Place Activity: Britain and the Slave Trade 1555 - 1833

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These detailed beautifully illustrated resources have been designed to help students investigate Britain’s involvement in the slave trade through a market place activity. The information is presented in a time line format which can be displayed around the classroom or passed around. The main task is suitable for the full ability range and includes additional activities to the market place task, which can be mixed and matched to suit your curriculum time and students. I have included additional file to give you a comprehensive preview of what is included. There are a number of different ways to deliver a market place activity. This resource has a mixture of activities that are designed to be a proactive lesson to get students up, moving around and working collaboratively. If you are not comfortable with that, they can always get them to pass the information slides around the classroom. The slides themselves are beautifully illustrated and are worthwhile printing off in colour and putting into a plastic wallet When you purchase this resource, you will be able to download two PowerPoints. The first includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, tasks, activities, information slides, historical sources, pictures, diagrams, templates, summary and feedback sheets. Once students have completed the market place activity, they can complete an extended written answer to the core question. However, if you prefer you could get your students to produce a mind map summarising what they have discovered from their investigation. or get each group to present their findings on the topics that they have been given to research. The second PowerPoint includes twenty seven information slides on Britain’s involvement in the slave trade. Please see the preview for more information: The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Britain and the Slave Trade 1555 - 1833 Know: Why did Britain get involved in the slave trade? Understand: Why did some people want to abolish the slavery? Evaluate: Why did Britain abolish the slave trade and end slavery? Skills: Collaboration, Cause, Consequence, Change & Continuity. WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Why did Britain get involved in the slave trade? Explain: Why did some people want to abolish slavery? Analyse: Why did Britain abolish the slave trade and end slavery? If you are looking for similar resources then please check out our TES shop. This lesson can be purchased at a discount as part of a bundled package. If you would like to stay up to date with our latest offerings, then you can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal. Kind Regards Roy
Strengths & Weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution
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Strengths & Weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution

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This engaging lesson has been carefully written to help students understand the key features of the Weimar Constitution and assess both its strengths and weaknesses. After Germany lost the First World War, the Kaiser fled and a new democratic government of Germany was declared in February 1919, at the small town of Weimar. The constitution that was drawn was amongst the most liberal in Europe, However, it contained a number of strengths and weaknesses that played a key part in the instability which helped the Nazis into power. When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a single page Word Document and an accompanying eleven slide PowerPoint. The Word document contains a learning objective, instructions, two heading cards labeled ‘Strengths’ and ‘Weaknesses’, as well as fourteen cards which describe features of the Weimar Constitution. Once students have assessed which cards are ‘Strengths’ or ‘Weaknesses’ they can then pair them up to the sub headings: President, Chancellor, Reichstag, Proportional Representations, The Voters, Article 48 and the Bill of Rights. The PowerPoint includes aims, objectives, differentiated outcomes, starters, plenaries, templates, writing frames, animated diagrams to show the divisions of power, appropriate video clips and activities to help facilitate the lesson. For more information, please see the detailed preview. If used as a stand alone resource, the card sort makes a great starter or plenary to completed in pairs or groups. It can be cut up the students or placed into envelopes for use with several classes or even set as a piece of homework. Once completed, students will have a detailed summary diagram of the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution. The aims and objectives of this less are: Theme: Weimar Republic 1919 - 1923 Know: What were the key features of the Weimar Constitution? Understand: What were the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution? Evaluate: Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the beginning? Skills: Cause, Consequence & Collaboration WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: The key features of the Weimar Constitution? Explain: What were the strengths and weaknesses of the Weimar Constitution? Analyse: Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the beginning? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop, where many have been bundled together to provide you with further savings. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Invaders & Settlers: The Vikings
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Invaders & Settlers: The Vikings

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This lesson is designed as an KS3 introductory module called ‘Invaders and Settlers AD43 - 1066’. It provides an overview of the Viking invasions and their impact on Anglo Saxon England. There is also a focus on the decline and rise again of towns and education, which is a theme which is returned to in other KS3 modules on medieval towns and industrialisation 1750 - 1900. The tasks and activities included in this module are suitable for the full range of ability at KS3 and are designed as a bridge or transition from KS2. One of the activities is on the origin of place names and makes a nice rounding off activity for the theme invaders and settlers, before starting the Norman Conquest. The aims and objectives of this lesson are: Theme: Why was England invaded and settled from 40 AD to 1066? Know: Who were the Vikings and why did they come to Britain? Understand: : How did Alfred the Great defeat the Vikings? Evaluate: What impact did the Vikings invasions have on Britain? Skills: Cause, Consequence, Evaluation and Judgement WILF – What Am I Looking For? Identify & describe: Who were the Vikings and why did they come to Britain? Explain: How did Alfred the Great defeat the Vikings? Analyse: What impact did the Vikings invasions have on Britain? When you purchase this resource you will be able to download a twenty five slide PowerPoint Presentation which includes starters, plenaries and a range of interactive resources and activities. These include a snowballing stater, buzz , information slides, the origin of place names, summary tasks, Venn diagrams and links to video clips on the Vikings and their impact on Anglo Saxon England. Everything you need to photocopy is include in the PP> You will need access to You Tube in order to access the video clips. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow ‘The History Academy’ on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy
Oracy - Speaking Starters
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Oracy - Speaking Starters

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This great resource speaks for itself - it contains a series of PowerPoint slides which can be printed off for display purposes or used as cards to help students improve their debating skills. The sentence starters include: To agree To disagree To Generalise To Make Exceptions To Ask Explanations To Make Connections To Ask to Clarify If you like this free resource, then why not check out some of my paid resources. Kind Regards Roy
Literacy: A Writing Frame to Recount / Retell
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Literacy: A Writing Frame to Recount / Retell

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These literacy cards are designed to be cut out or used as worksheet to help students recount or retell a story or event. If you like this free resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Kind Regards Roy