Use Different Openers!Quick View
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Use Different Openers!

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A useful resource for classroom displays. This resource contains A4 posters encouraging the use of different openers such as: Try using an adverb; Try using a conjunction; Try using an -ing word; Try using a simile or a metaphor; Try using time openers; Try using an -ed clause. It also contains some examples of adverbs, time openers, -ed, and -ing words.
Christian Parables teaching resource.Quick View
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Christian Parables teaching resource.

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the parables of the Christian faith as told in the New Testament. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six parables in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to parables. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover images is Parable of the hidden treasure, by possibly Rembrandt; possibly Gerard Dou, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.
Stories from Buddhist TraditionsQuick View
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Stories from Buddhist Traditions

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the stories of various Buddhist traditions. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six stories in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to Jakatas. The What’s It Tree and the Prince Vessantara stories both have accompanying PowerPoint Presentations for illustrative purposes. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover image is Vessantara Jataka, Narrative Scroll, by Anonymous (Thailand) is licensed under CC0.
Pokemon Average PostersQuick View
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Pokemon Average Posters

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A set of three posters aimed at Primary School learners that lay out different techniques for finding averages, using the example of Pokemon Hit Points. The posters cover mean, mode and median methods, include graphs to visually show averages and information about the advantages and disadvantages of each. Also included are versions of the posters that are editable in PowerPoint. For these to display correctly users will need to download the following free font https://www.urbanfonts.com/fonts/Pokemon__Normal.font Key words: Mean, Mode, Median, Average, Graphs, Pokemon Created as part of the School of Geosciences’ Outreach Programme, which allows students in their final year to work in partnership with a local school to develop a set of lesson plans. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk Authors: Kay Douglas, Tomas Sanders and Rebecca Shannon Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC-BY 4.0 license
Stories from Hindu TraditionsQuick View
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Stories from Hindu Traditions

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the stories of various Hindu traditions. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six stories in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to the Mahabharata (or Mahābhārata, pronounced ma-haa baa-ra-ta), one of the great epics of India. The Descent of the Ganges also has an accompanying PowerPoint presentation for illustrative purposes. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover image is Mahabharata, 1852, Miniature 11, from The University of Edinburgh collection, CC BY 3.0.
Introduction to the BrainQuick View
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Introduction to the Brain

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This resource contains a workshop with activities about the structure and functions of the brain and what happens when it goes wrong. It also contains short biographies of the two co-authors and details of their academic involvement in psychology. It is intended for learners studying the Scottish National 5 Psychology curriculum. Learning outcomes Name and locate the different lobes of the brain. Understand the functions of each brain, and their real-life applications. Actively work in a team with a common goal. Understand the implications of brain damage, such as the case of Phineas Gage. In this resource This resource bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Practitioner Notes: contains in-depth notes as to the characteristics and composition of the brain, along with several support videos that may benefit learners. Also included are the rules for the “Brain Game” Brain Cut Out: a single page with a coloured image of the brain, as required by the “Brain Game” Brain Function and Lobe Names: for use in the “Brain Game” Clue Cards: a set of clue cards for use in the “Brain Game” Clue Card Answers: the corresponding answers to go along with the Clue Cards in the “Brain Game” Meet the Psychologists: a single page document with a short description and picture of the two authors of this resource This resource was created as part of Psychology Outreach and Engagement which allows undergraduate psychology students to develop new projects aimed at meeting the needs of local community partners as part of their degree. This resource was developed in partnership with Craigroyston Community High School, Edinburgh. Lorna Camus, an MA Hons Psychology student and Agniete Pocyte, a BSc Hons Psychology student, produced and delivered the resource with the help of Eric Freund, a teacher at Craigroyston Community High School. We are indebted to Eric, but we would also like to thank his 1A and his 2C classes for their participation and enthusiasm. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Lorna Camus and Agniete Pocyte, adapted by Kay Douglas and Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under the CC BY 4.0 license.
Wonder in Magic - Probability – Magic Card TrickQuick View
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Wonder in Magic - Probability – Magic Card Trick

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This resource is a the second of a set of four lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to discover the science and maths behind magic. This session teaches PROBABILITY. (Other sessions involve AIR PRESSURE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, STATIC ELECTRICITY) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. This is the second resource and it focuses on probability, a magic card trick. The first has an activity on air pressure. The third involves chemical reactions and the fourth static electricity. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes  PDF and editable versions of the following: Probability – What’s the Chance?- contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark MNU 2-22a: I can conduct simple experiments involving chance and communicate my predictions and findings using the vocabulary of probability. (Uses the language of probability accurately to describe the likelihood of simple events occurring, for example equal chance; fifty-fifty; one in two, two in three) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www/open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
Meteorological Visibility Observations: A User's GuideQuick View
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Meteorological Visibility Observations: A User's Guide

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This Meteorological Observation Guide has been written as part of a NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) Research Experience Placement carried out in the School of GeoSciences, The University of Edinburgh. Aimed at National 5 to Higher. The aim of the research project was to investigate specific aspects of how global climate change affects the climate of Britain. There are two main aims to this project: 1. Conduct visibility observations from Blackford Hill in Edinburgh, observing to see whether in times of anti-cyclonic weather, pollution build up in the atmosphere reduces the observed visibility. 2. Analysis of historical climate models to see how the frequency of anti-cyclones over the UK has changed due to anthropogenic climate change. This guide is part of the former section. The procedure that follows is the procedure used over the period of the project, and the Blackford Hill example used is the actual visibility observation that was conducted. This element of the project is transferable to other locations with a suitable vantage point. The work can be carried out by a class group or as part of a specific scientific project for senior pupils. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk Author: James Holehouse Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC-BY 4.0 license Keywords: Anti-cyclonic weather; Meteorological Visibility Observations; hill; Climate Change; Weather; Climate Cover image is The view over the City of Edinburgh looking towards the north from Blackford Hill by Brian Cameron, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.
Democracy in Theory and PracticeQuick View
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Democracy in Theory and Practice

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This resource contains PowerPoint slides for a lifelong learning course which introduces different democratic theories and traces the development of modern mass democracy from ancient Greece to the present. The course is intended for adult learners and taught at university foundation level (Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework level 7). Democracy in Theory and Practice is offered as part of the Short Courses programme at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Open Learning. For further information, visit Short Courses. Learning outcomes On completion of this course, students will be able to: • Distinguish different models of democracy and their normative assumptions; • Apply democratic theories to critically assess political institutions and practices; • Reflect on the nature of citizenship and identify ways to participate in public life; • Engage in dialogue about the meaning and value of democracy; • Present arguments clearly and coherently. Content This resource bundle includes nine PowerPoint presentations: Introduction Classic Models I: Athenian Democracy Classic Models II: Civic Republicanism Classic Models III: Liberal Constitutionalism Modern Democracy I: Representative Government Modern Democracy II: The Role of the State Modern Democracy III: The Global Context The Future of Democracy I: Alternative Models The Future of Democracy II: Innovations and Reforms To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Max Jaede All content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image: Greek Rally Against Troika, by D. Byrne, CC BY 2.0.
Introduction to Chinese PhilosophyQuick View
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Introduction to Chinese Philosophy

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This open educational resource contains PowerPoint slides for a lifelong learning course which introduces the major schools of classical Chinese philosophy, including Confucianism and Daoism. Philosophical texts are approached in English translation, focusing on how the ancient Chinese thought about philosophical topics which concern us today. The course is intended for adult learners and taught at university foundation level (Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework level 7). Introduction to Chinese Philosophy is offered as part of the Short Courses programme at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Open Learning. For further information, visit Short Courses. Learning outcomes On completion of this course, students will be able to: identify different approaches in classical Chinese philosophy; describe the positions of Chinese philosophers on philosophical issues; read and analyse extracts of Chinese philosophical texts in English translation. Content This resource bundle includes four PowerPoint presentations. Please click the links below to download them. Confucianism I: General Background and the Analects Confucianism II: Mencius and Xunzi Daoism I: Daodejing Daoism II: Zhuangzi You can also find open access English translations of the texts (with the exception of the Xunzi) from the links below: Analects: http://www.acmuller.net/con-dao/analects.html https://ctext.org/analects Mencius: http://www.acmuller.net/con-dao/mencius.html https://ctext.org/mengzi Daodejing: http://www.acmuller.net/con-dao/daodejing.html https://ctext.org/dao-de-jing Zhuangzi: https://terebess.hu/english/chuangtzu.html https://ctext.org/zhuangzi To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Lee Wilson All content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image: silk painting depicting a man riding a dragon, public domain image on Wikimedia Commons.
'Prejudice Reduction Strategies' Psychology ResourceQuick View
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'Prejudice Reduction Strategies' Psychology Resource

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This resource is a presentation with activities about contact theory, the bystander effect and cognitive dissonance. It also contains short biographies of the two co-authors and details of their academic involvement in psychology. The target audience for this resource is learners studying the Scottish National 5 Psychology course (or equivalent). Learning outcomes Understand the difference between stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination Be able to recognise a prejudiced comment Ability to respond to prejudiced comment in a constructive way Know several effective prejudice reducing strategies Understand the basics of contact theory Understand the bystander effect and its underlying factors Understand cognitive dissonance In this resource This resource bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Practitioner Notes: contains notes detailing how to deliver the lessons, an activity on ‘Practising Prejudice Reduction’, and a ‘Meet the Psychologists’ section providing a short introduction to the authors of the resource. Presentation: a short presentation. Details of use and when to present are included in the Practitioner Notes. This resource was created as part of Psychology Outreach and Engagement which allows undergraduate psychology students to develop new projects aimed at meeting the needs of local community partners as part of their degree. This resource was developed in partnership with Craigroyston Community High School, Edinburgh. Lorna Camus, an MA Hons Psychology student and Agniete Pocyte, a BSc Hons Psychology student, produced and delivered the resource with the help of Eric Freund, a teacher at Craigroyston Community High School. We are indebted to Eric, but we would also like to thank his 1A and his 2C classes for their participation and enthusiasm. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Lorna Camus and Agniete Pocyte, adapted by Kay Douglas and Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY 4.0 license.
Sustainability and Conservation (Interdisciplinary Learning)Quick View
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Sustainability and Conservation (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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Sustainability and Conservation is a relaxed and fun way to engage students in sustainability and conservation subjects. The topics of wildlife, nature art, habitat loss, scientific methods and waste and pollution are covered. Hands on activities the learners enable the learners to apply these themes into their daily lives by exploring nature. Through five workshops they will become ambassadors of conservation and sustainability and will be able to teach their family and friends about it. In case of rainy days or inaccessibility to outdoor areas ‘Plan B’s’ have been created: games modified to limited indoor areas. There is a section on additional information, this provides online links to websites and reports that are related to the resource’s subject areas. Learning outcomes: Art and Design EXA 2-02a: I have the opportunity to choose and explore an extended range of media and technologies to create images and objects, comparing and combining them for specific tasks. Sciences - Biodiversity and interdependence: SCN 2-01a: I can identify and classify examples of living things, past and present, to help me appreciate their diversity. I can relate physical and behavioural characteristics to their survival or extinction. SCN 2-02a: I have contributed to the design or conservation of a wildlife area. Sciences - Topical Sciences: SCN 2-20b: I can report and comment on current scientific news items to develop my knowledge and understanding of topical science. Social Studies – People, place and environment SOC 2-08a: I can describe the major characteristic features of Scotland’s landscape and explain how these are formed. SOC 2-08b: I can describe the physical processes of a natural disaster and discuss its impact on people and the landscape. This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Moa Bell, adapted by Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
Flight School Forces 2: Wing LiftQuick View
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Flight School Forces 2: Wing Lift

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This resource is a the second of a set of five lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to get their ‘wings’ from Flight School, by completing activities on forces associated with flight. Other sessions involve LIFT, THRUST, WEIGHT), and the fifth AEROPLANE pulls together all the learning. In this second session students are introduced to the force LIFT. This session is designed to allow the students to investigate lift by focusing on the shape of an aeroplane wing. By the end of the lesson the goal is that the students will have an understanding about the shape of an aeroplane wing and how it causes the aeroplane to fly up into the air. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: • Teaching Notes - contents for each lesson includes: • Science behind the lesson • Materials best for the session • Parachute shapes • Plenary responses • List of resources specific for this lesson. • Main Lesson Plan (as a PowerPoint Resource) • Learning goals • Overview • Set Up • Task • Plenary and Feedback Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. TCH 2-04b: I am developing dexterity, creativity and confidence when working with textiles. MTH 2-16b: Through practical activities, I can show my understanding of the relationship between 3D objects and their nets. LIT 2-02a: When I engage with others, , I can respond in ways appropriate to my role, show that I value others’ contributions and use these to build on thinking. This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of Geosciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. Author: Joanna Barrie. Adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh please visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk.
Flight School Forces: AeroplaneQuick View
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Flight School Forces: Aeroplane

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This resource is a the fifth of a set of five lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to get their ‘wings’ from Flight School, by completing activities on forces associated with flight. **This fifth session combines the knowledge of the forces DRAG, LIFT, THRUST, and WEIGHT from the precious four sessions, to investigate aeroplane design in a comparative test. The learner self-evaluation and learning log which has also been included in this bundle. In this lesson students can create their planes from a design focus combined with their learning so far during the previous four lessons. They will be able to really contextualise their learning while experimenting and creating their own aeroplane designs. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: • Teaching Notes - contents for each lesson includes: • Science behind the lesson • Materials best for the session • Parachute shapes • Plenary responses List of resources specific for this lesson. • Main Lesson Plan (as a PowerPoint Resource) • Learning goals • Overview • Set Up • Task • Plenary and Feedback Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. TCH 2-04b: I am developing dexterity, creativity and confidence when working with textiles. TCH 2-04c: I can extend and explore problem solving strategies to meet increasingly difficult challenges with a food or textile focus. MTH 2-16b: Through practical activities, I can show my understanding of the relationship between 3D objects and their nets. LIT 2-02a: When I engage with others, I can respond in ways appropriate to my role, show that I value others’ contributions and use these to build on thinking. This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Joanna Barrie, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
Kind Clothing: Sustainable Fashion (Interdisciplinary Learning)Quick View
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Kind Clothing: Sustainable Fashion (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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Kind Clothing is a project written for Girlguides, designed by Hannah Fieldsend. It aims to fit into the exciting and varied programme suited to inspire and challenge Girlguides ages 10-14. Any groups looking to achieve their ‘Global Awareness’ guiding essential can use Kind Clothing as part of their programme, and it covers topics such as Sustainability, Environmental Issues and Practical Skills. It consists of three interactive sessions that introduce the idea of Fast Fashion and link it to the concepts of the environment and sustainability. Throughout the sessions there is an overarching project where the girlguides recycle a piece of clothing into a DIY drawstring bag. Learning outcomes: Girlguiding Programme Session 1 Express myself: innovate, communicate Session 2 Express myself: innovate, communicate Skills for my future: live smart Session 3 Know myself: reflect, network Skills for my future: live smart Take action: make change, influence Scottish Curriculum for Excellence Learning Objectives: Session 1 Literacy: LIT 2-07a, I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. Environment: SOC 3-08a, I can identify the possible consequences of an environmental issue and make informed suggestions about ways to manage the impact. Session 2 Planetary Processes: SCN 3-05b, I can explain some of the processes, which contribute to climate change and discuss the possible impact of atmospheric change on the survival of living things. Environment: SOC 2-08a, I can discuss the environmental impact of human activity and suggest ways in which we can live in a more environmentally responsible way. Session 3 People in Society: SOC 2-20a, Through exploring ethnical trading, I can understand how people’s basic needs are the same round the world, discussing why some societies are more able to meet these needs than others. People in Society: SOC 3-19a, I can describe how the interdependence of countries affects levels of development, considering the effects on people’s lives. This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. This resource was originally developed for girlguides, and was successfully run with a girlguide group. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Hannah Fieldsend, adapted by Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY 4.0 license.
Wonder in Magic  - Air PressureQuick View
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Wonder in Magic - Air Pressure

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This resource is  the first of a set of  4 lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to explain the science and maths behind magic. This first session teaches AIR PRESSURE, a gravitational force. (Other sessions involve PROBABILITY, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, STATIC ELECTRICITY. ) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. This is the first on air pressure, a gravitational force. The second has an activity on probability. The third involves chemical reactions and the fourth static electricity. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. The log-book (‘Book of Spells’), general teaching notes, completion certificate and letter (‘hook’) are included with all resources. This is the first on air pressure, a gravitational force. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes PDF and editable versions of the following: Air Pressure – A Magical Fountain - contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. y investigating how friction, including air resistance, affects motion, I can suggest ways to improve efficiency in moving objects. (Explores and explains air pressure, a gravitational force) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
Wonder in Magic   Electrostatics – Magic wand trickQuick View
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Wonder in Magic Electrostatics – Magic wand trick

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This resource is  the fourth of a set of  4 lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to explain the science and maths behind magic. This session teaches STATIC ELECTRICITY, a magic wand trick. (Other sessions involve PROBABILITY, AIR PRESSURE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS. ) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. The first has an activity on air pressure. The second has an activity on probability and tthe third is on chemical reactions. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. The log-book (‘Book of Spells’), general teaching notes, completion certificate and letter (‘hook’) are included with all resources. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Electrostatics – Hopping Magic Wands - contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources * ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. (Explains how some objects may become electrically charged by rubbing two surfaces together and how the charges produce an electrostatic force. Investigates and demonstrates understanding that electrostatic forces can both repel and attract.) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. Read less
Volcano, Continents, and Oceans (Interdisciplinary Learning)Quick View
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Volcano, Continents, and Oceans (Interdisciplinary Learning)

(1)
Properties and uses of substances, Earth’s Materials, People Place & Environment This mini resource comprises 2 sessions (or one afternoon). Session 1 uses songs to name and locate the continents, oceans and Pacific Ring of Fire. Session 2 involves a reaction of vinegar and bicarbonate of soda to mimic a volcanic eruption. Session 1 is PowerPoint presentation, giving general background on the World Map and names and locations of the continents, oceans and by inference the Pacific Ring of Fire. Despite being ppt based, you can make it interactive and even sing along with the songs. A consolidation worksheet is included to label the world map. Session 2 is a practical activity/demonstration. It involves using the chemical reaction (neutralisation) of bicarbonate of soda and vinegar. These react together to form carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide is the fizzy gas in ‘pop’. Adding washing up liquid and tomato ketchup to the mix allows for red CO2 bubbles from the mouth of the small drinks bottle. A copy and complete exercise can be copied from the second half of the PowerPoint. Learning outcomes: Sciences - Biodiversity and interdependence SCN 2-15a: ‘By contributing to investigations into familiar changes in substances to produce other substances, I can describe how their characteristics have changed.’ and the explanatory benchmark, ‘Observes and identifies some of the signs of a chemical reaction, for example, production of bubbles, colour/texture change and heat given out/taken in.’ SCN 2-17a ‘Having explored the substances that make up Earth’s surface, I can compare some of their characteristics and uses‘ Social Studies - People, place, and environment SOC 2-07b: ‘I can describe the physical processes of a natural disaster and discuss its impact on people and the landscape and the explanatory benchmark ‘the explanatory benchmark ‘Describes the causes of a natural disaster such as a volcano, earthquake or extreme weather event’. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk Author: Kay Douglas of The University of Edinburgh, 2019. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
Wonder in Magic   Chemical Reactions – Magic Invisible Ink TrickQuick View
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Wonder in Magic Chemical Reactions – Magic Invisible Ink Trick

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This resource is  the third of a set of  4 lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to explain the science and maths behind magic. This session teaches CHEMICAL REACTIONS, magic invisible ink trick. (Other sessions involve PROBABILITY, AIR PRESSURE, STATIC ELECTRICITY. ) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. The first has an activity on air pressure. The second has an activity on probability and the fourth static electricity. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. The log-book (‘Book of Spells’), general teaching notes, completion certificate and letter (‘hook’) are included with all resources. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes PDF and editable versions of the following: This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Chemical Reactions – Secret Message- contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. y investigating how friction, including air resistance, affects motion, I can suggest ways to improve efficiency in moving objects. (Explores and explains air pressure, a gravitational force) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
Germs, Disease, Vaccines & Chemical ReactionsQuick View
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Germs, Disease, Vaccines & Chemical Reactions

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Germs, Disease, Vaccines & Chemical Reactions has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons is to increase knowledge and awareness during and after the covid-19 pandemic and help support the pupils in developing fair tests and inquiry skills. In each of the four/five sessions, the scene is set by Jason Leitch, Clinical Director asking pupils to act as investigators to solve a problem. The first introduces four types of microbe and where they lurk in schools. The second is a comparison experiment using a plant spray to mimic sneezing. The third session explores vaccines and fair testing on chemical reactions. The final session uses a card game to explain pandemics and global diseases patterns. A lab-book is enclosed with optional additional worksheets. The Teacher’s guide offers help with the experiments (including photos) and basic science on the resource in addition to hyperlinked resources. All sessions can be linked to the covid-19 pandemic if wished. Help and resources are to be found in the Teacher’s Guide. Contents in this resource • Extensive Teacher’s guide o Lesson Plan o Resource list and safety information o ‘Basic Facts and online resources’ (hyperlinked) o ‘Help with the Investigation’ (includes photos) • PowerPoint presentations. Included in these are the letter (‘hook’) from the current National Clinical Director, Professor Jason Leitch. Here are some of his videos (In the Young Scot one, he introduces himself) • Lab Book (short reflective notebook) • Learner worksheet for ‘sneeze experiment’ (session 2) • Pandemic cards (for photocopying in session 4) • Suggestions for extension **Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence ** SCN 2-19a, SCN 2-20a, SCN 2-20b, SCN 1-13a Second Level: Sciences Inquiry and Investigation skills: SOC 2-14a, SOC 2-19a, MTH 2-21a This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Stacey Fullerton, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. OpenCovid4Ed
Sustainable Schools – An IDL STEM design challengeQuick View
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Sustainable Schools – An IDL STEM design challenge

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This interdisciplinary approach using STEM/ STE(A)M subjects involves the learners being ‘hooked’ by a plea from the head of their Council to design a new school sustainably. Ideas of fair trading and fair testing are explored in the resource. This resource comprises five sessions: auditing your school’s current sustainable features, learning about fair trading using: a maths building game, designing and then making a sustainable school t-shirt (fast fashion) building a windmill with easy materials applying the fair test principle in which scenario the windmill works better. This resource includes: • A teacher block overview for the five sessions (Auditing your School’s sustainability, Fair Trade building, Sustainable School Clothing, Building Wind turbines, Fair test on a wind turbine) • Learner log-book (learner planning sheet) • Teacher guide for each session with any associated material [worksheet (lesson 1), ppt slide (lesson 2), hyperlinks] • Learner ‘hook’ letters (This can be customised to your situation) Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence TCH 2-02b, TCH 2-04b, TCH 2-06a, TCH 2-07a, TCH 2-09a, MNU 2-10b, MNU 2-20b, MTH 2-16c, SCN 2-04a, SCN 2-20b, SOC 2-08a, SOC 2-20a, EXA 2-06a, LIT 2-02a, LIT 2-07a. Sustainable schools – an IDL STEM design challenge, has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative, aimed at promoting regular attendance in primary schools. This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Nicole Campbell, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.