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University of Edinburgh Open.Ed

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Free open educational resources from the University of Edinburgh to download and adapt for primary and secondary teaching.

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Free open educational resources from the University of Edinburgh to download and adapt for primary and secondary teaching.
Graph Theory: Puzzles and Games
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Graph Theory: Puzzles and Games

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This resource is a set of worksheets about games and puzzles based on simple concepts in graph theory. The resource covers: the seven bridges of Konigsberg, the Shannon Switching game and graph vertex colouring. The resource is aimed at a general public level as formal mathematical knowledge is not required beyond counting, but younger audiences would need more guidance. This resource aims to provide a very basic introduction to graph theory. The activities are designed to get participants to become familiar with how problems can be simplified into graph theory problems and how that may be used to find solutions. In this resource: Graph Colouring: solving scheduling and allocating problems using graphs Instructor guide 4 Party Problems 3 Radio Problems Rivers and Bridges: based on the Bridges of Konigsberg problem Instructor guide Matching activity Worksheets for 4 real cities (including Konigsberg) Shannon Switching game: a simple game which is played on a graph Instructor guide PowerPoint explaining the game (with presentation guide) 4 Virus games Simple examples Design your own graph to win the game This resource was originally developed for the Edinburgh International Science Festival with the School of Mathematics. Authors: Francesca Iezzi, Ana McKellar, Lukas Cerny, Benedetta Mussati and Patrick Kinnear (with additional input from other members of the Maths Outreach Team), adapted for wider audiences by Ana McKellar. Unless otherwise stated, all content (including original images) is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image is Four Color Problem by Jeff Kubina (Flickr) is licenced under CC BY-SA 2.0.
Wonder in Magic - Probability – Magic Card Trick
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Wonder in Magic - Probability – Magic Card Trick

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This resource is a the second of a set of four lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to discover the science and maths behind magic. This session teaches PROBABILITY. (Other sessions involve AIR PRESSURE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, STATIC ELECTRICITY) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. This is the second resource and it focuses on probability, a magic card trick. The first has an activity on air pressure. The third involves chemical reactions and the fourth static electricity. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes  PDF and editable versions of the following: Probability – What’s the Chance?- contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark MNU 2-22a: I can conduct simple experiments involving chance and communicate my predictions and findings using the vocabulary of probability. (Uses the language of probability accurately to describe the likelihood of simple events occurring, for example equal chance; fifty-fifty; one in two, two in three) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www/open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
Pokemon Average Posters
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Pokemon Average Posters

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A set of three posters aimed at Primary School learners that lay out different techniques for finding averages, using the example of Pokemon Hit Points. The posters cover mean, mode and median methods, include graphs to visually show averages and information about the advantages and disadvantages of each. Also included are versions of the posters that are editable in PowerPoint. For these to display correctly users will need to download the following free font https://www.urbanfonts.com/fonts/Pokemon__Normal.font Key words: Mean, Mode, Median, Average, Graphs, Pokemon Created as part of the School of Geosciences’ Outreach Programme, which allows students in their final year to work in partnership with a local school to develop a set of lesson plans. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk Authors: Kay Douglas, Tomas Sanders and Rebecca Shannon Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC-BY 4.0 license
Introduction to the Brain
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Introduction to the Brain

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This resource contains a workshop with activities about the structure and functions of the brain and what happens when it goes wrong. It also contains short biographies of the two co-authors and details of their academic involvement in psychology. It is intended for learners studying the Scottish National 5 Psychology curriculum. Learning outcomes Name and locate the different lobes of the brain. Understand the functions of each brain, and their real-life applications. Actively work in a team with a common goal. Understand the implications of brain damage, such as the case of Phineas Gage. In this resource This resource bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Practitioner Notes: contains in-depth notes as to the characteristics and composition of the brain, along with several support videos that may benefit learners. Also included are the rules for the “Brain Game” Brain Cut Out: a single page with a coloured image of the brain, as required by the “Brain Game” Brain Function and Lobe Names: for use in the “Brain Game” Clue Cards: a set of clue cards for use in the “Brain Game” Clue Card Answers: the corresponding answers to go along with the Clue Cards in the “Brain Game” Meet the Psychologists: a single page document with a short description and picture of the two authors of this resource This resource was created as part of Psychology Outreach and Engagement which allows undergraduate psychology students to develop new projects aimed at meeting the needs of local community partners as part of their degree. This resource was developed in partnership with Craigroyston Community High School, Edinburgh. Lorna Camus, an MA Hons Psychology student and Agniete Pocyte, a BSc Hons Psychology student, produced and delivered the resource with the help of Eric Freund, a teacher at Craigroyston Community High School. We are indebted to Eric, but we would also like to thank his 1A and his 2C classes for their participation and enthusiasm. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Lorna Camus and Agniete Pocyte, adapted by Kay Douglas and Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under the CC BY 4.0 license.
Tackling Mental Health
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Tackling Mental Health

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Two workshops covering what mental health is and how to promote it – aimed at learners aged 11 to 14. Includes workshop plans with presentations. Educational Level 3 (HWB 3-01a, HWB 3-02a, HWB 3-03a, HWB 3-04a, HWB 3-05a, HWB 3-06a, HWB 3-07a) This resource bundle includes lesson plans (pdf and editable word version) and presentation for: Workshop 1: What is mental health? Self-reflection activity What influences by mental health? What is influenced by mental health? Workshop 2: Title Self-reflection activity Strategies for maintaining good mental health Red flags in mental health What is depression? What is anxiety? Quiz This resource was created as part of Psychology Outreach and Engagement which allows undergraduate psychology students to develop new projects aimed at meeting the needs of local community partners as part of their degree. Author: Melina Zavali Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY 4.0 license. Cover image is Mental Health by Wokandapix, licensed under the Pixabay license.
Wonder in Magic  - Air Pressure
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Wonder in Magic - Air Pressure

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This resource is  the first of a set of  4 lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to explain the science and maths behind magic. This first session teaches AIR PRESSURE, a gravitational force. (Other sessions involve PROBABILITY, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, STATIC ELECTRICITY. ) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. This is the first on air pressure, a gravitational force. The second has an activity on probability. The third involves chemical reactions and the fourth static electricity. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. The log-book (‘Book of Spells’), general teaching notes, completion certificate and letter (‘hook’) are included with all resources. This is the first on air pressure, a gravitational force. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes PDF and editable versions of the following: Air Pressure – A Magical Fountain - contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. y investigating how friction, including air resistance, affects motion, I can suggest ways to improve efficiency in moving objects. (Explores and explains air pressure, a gravitational force) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
Sea Level and Climate Change
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Sea Level and Climate Change

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An eight-part project about sea level change since the ice age. Covers glaciation, global warming and isostasy. Includes lesson plans, presentations, workbooks and a template for a timeline poster to illustrate the content of the eight sessions. Educational Level 3 & 4 (SCN 2.05, 3.05a, 3.05b, 2.17a, 3.20b, 4.08b, SOC 2.07a, 3.07a, 4.07a, 2.08a, 3.08a) This resource bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Lesson plan Learning context Part 1: Introducing the Ice Age Part 2: Finding Evidence for the Ice Age Part 3: The Ice Age and sea-level change Part 4: Coming out of the Ice Age Part 5: Introducing isostasy Part 6: Isostasy and sea-level change Part 7: Current sea-level change Part 8: The impacts of current sea-level change Presentations Lesson slides Isostatic uplift Timeline display Timeline components Student workbook (and version with model answers) Photograph sets and question sets This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. This resource was originally created for Boroughmuir High School Author: Roseanne Smith, adapted by Stephanie (Charlie) Farley and Martin Tasker. Unless otherwise stated, all content released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image is Getz Ice Shelf by NASA/Dick Ewers, licensed under CC0.
Christian Parables teaching resource.
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Christian Parables teaching resource.

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the parables of the Christian faith as told in the New Testament. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six parables in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to parables. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover images is Parable of the hidden treasure, by possibly Rembrandt; possibly Gerard Dou, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.
Stories from Hindu Traditions
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Stories from Hindu Traditions

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the stories of various Hindu traditions. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six stories in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to the Mahabharata (or Mahābhārata, pronounced ma-haa baa-ra-ta), one of the great epics of India. The Descent of the Ganges also has an accompanying PowerPoint presentation for illustrative purposes. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover image is Mahabharata, 1852, Miniature 11, from The University of Edinburgh collection, CC BY 3.0.
Stories from Buddhist Traditions
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Stories from Buddhist Traditions

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the stories of various Buddhist traditions. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six stories in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to Jakatas. The What’s It Tree and the Prince Vessantara stories both have accompanying PowerPoint Presentations for illustrative purposes. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover image is Vessantara Jataka, Narrative Scroll, by Anonymous (Thailand) is licensed under CC0.
Sow it, Grow it, Taste it (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Sow it, Grow it, Taste it (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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An interdisciplinary approach to growing and tasting vegetables using experiences and outcomes in the sciences, health and wellbeing, numeracy and literacy. Young learners love to be practical and this resource encourages them to grow plants from seed, fruit and vegetable scraps. The learners are encouraged to taste what they grow, where possible, and to discuss their taste preferences. The additional activities suggested include possible scientific investigations, planting up old wellies, growing hanging baskets with salad & herbs or planting bulbs for a present. Encouraging young learners to recognise common fruits and vegetables and consuming five portions of fruit and vegetables daily is included. The Education Scotland website has a series of very useful links about ‘The Way We Grow and Catch Food in Scotland’. Suitable for Early Education under the Scottish CfE. Keywords: Biodiversity and Interdependence, Nutrition, Safe and Hygenic Practice, Food and the Consumer, Creating texts, Data and analysis, Number and Number Processes, ICT to enhance learning. EdUniOER Cover image is Raphanus sativus, red radish variant by Martin Kozák (Wikimedia), licensed under CC0.
Adaptation and extinction of woolly mammoths (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Adaptation and extinction of woolly mammoths (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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Three lessons covering, adaptation, survival characteristics and the extinction of the woolly mammoth with comparison to living elephants. Includes presentation slides and student worksheet with answers. Aimed at Level 2 (Biodiversity and interdependence, SCN 2-01a) This resource bundle includes: Lesson 1: Woolly mammoths and the ice age Lesson 2: The pygmy mammoths Lesson 3: Comparison of African elephant and the woolly mammoth Created as part of the School of Geosciences’ Outreach Programme, which allows students in their final year to work in partnership with a local school to develop a set of lesson plans. Author: Chloe Young, adapted by Cecily Plascott. Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC-BY 4.0 license. Cover image: Model of Mammuth primigenius at the Royal BC Museum by Iain Reid is licensed under CC-BY-SA-4.0.
Descriptive Statistics: DISPERSION
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Descriptive Statistics: DISPERSION

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A power point resource for teachers of biology, geography and environmental science for pupils studying at Advanced Higher, ( AS-Level, and above), and early FE/HE levels. Of use for helping to achieve a basic understanding and application of the ‘spread of data’ in fieldwork, assignments and examination questions. It complements the Guide to Descriptive Statistics in Geosciences (https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/guide-to-descriptive-statistics-in-geosciences-11308746).
LGBT+ Issues - A resource for Secondary Schools
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LGBT+ Issues - A resource for Secondary Schools

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This is an adaptation of a resource originally created by students in the School of Medicine at the University of Edinburgh about LGBT+ identity and associated social, legal and political issues. It is suitable for use with secondary school pupils of all ages. Created by Derrick Ng & Navina Senthilkumar This resource may be reused, redistributed and modified, as long as the authors and the University of Edinburgh are credited. ©University of Edinburgh released under a CC BY license. Cover image is by gagnonm1993 (Pixabay) and is licensed under the Pixabay license.
Wonder in Magic   Electrostatics – Magic wand trick
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Wonder in Magic Electrostatics – Magic wand trick

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This resource is  the fourth of a set of  4 lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to explain the science and maths behind magic. This session teaches STATIC ELECTRICITY, a magic wand trick. (Other sessions involve PROBABILITY, AIR PRESSURE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS. ) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. The first has an activity on air pressure. The second has an activity on probability and tthe third is on chemical reactions. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. The log-book (‘Book of Spells’), general teaching notes, completion certificate and letter (‘hook’) are included with all resources. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Electrostatics – Hopping Magic Wands - contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources * ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. (Explains how some objects may become electrically charged by rubbing two surfaces together and how the charges produce an electrostatic force. Investigates and demonstrates understanding that electrostatic forces can both repel and attract.) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. Read less
Mental Health & Wellbeing Guidance Booklet
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Mental Health & Wellbeing Guidance Booklet

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This resource is a booklet with a collection of strategies for improving mental health and wellbeing, a list of youth support agencies and a section with templates to aid the completion of some strategies. The target audience for this resource is anyone aged 12+ Aimed at Level 3 and above. The booklet aims to satisfy the HWB 3-02a, HWB 3-03a and HWB 2-06a benchmarks in the Health and wellbeing curriculum and includes a combination of strategies in different areas: Sleeping Stress and anxiety Self-esteem and body positivity Socialising Healthy lifestyle Online safety Author: Maria Teixeira-Dias at the University of Edinburgh. Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
Fertilisers in Food Production (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Fertilisers in Food Production (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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Brief project covering both the life cycle of plants and where food comes from. The project involves growing baked beans ingredients and includes different recipes for having a baked bean “bake-off”. This resource contains a class workbook and a practitioner’s guide. Educational Level 2 (SCN 2-02b, SCN 2-03a, SCN 2-14a, HWB 2-35a) This resource is a project covering both the lifecycle of plants and where food comes from. The project involves growing baked beans ingredients and includes different recipes for having a baked bean “bakeoff”. The resource covers the following topics: Where food comes from How food grows? How climate affects food production How seasons affect food production How chemicals affect our food This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. This resource was originally designed for South Morningside Primary School. Author: Emma Fairlie, adapted by Stephanie (Charlie) Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY 4.0 license. Cover image is Baked beans in tomato sauce by Mk2010 (Wikimedia) is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.
Food Production and Insects (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Food Production and Insects (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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This resource is a set of 5 lesson plans with slides, an experiment (with worksheets for analysing the results) and assessment items. The target audience for this resource is for learners aged between 14 and 16 years. Entomophagy is the human consumption of insects as food - it represents a sustainable alternative to the environmentally destructive effects of livestock based protein. The lessons presented here are based around a project designed to test the food conversion efficiency and water footprint of mealworms. The lessons are presented as 5 individual lessons each 50 minutes in length. They are designed to be incorporated into the school’s curriculum surrounding the food production unit for National 5 students. Providing that classes are taught when the food production unit would normally be delivered, these lessons can act as a detailed blueprint of how to teach the two related subjects in tandem. This resource aims to cover the following Curriculum for Excellence benchmarks: SOC 4-09a - Having evaluated the role of agriculture in the production of food and raw material, I can draw reasoned conclusions about the environmental impacts and sustainability. SCN 4-03a - Through investigating the nitrogen cycle and evaluating results from practical experiments, I can suggest a design for a fertiliser, taking account of its environmental impact. (Particularly the points associated with “Explores and explains the possible impact of the use of fertilisers, for example, algal blooms.”) SCN 4-20a - I have researched new developments in science and can explain how their current or future applications might impact on modern life.   This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course at the University of Edinburgh and was originally developed for the Trinity Academy in Edinburgh. Author: Danny Ashton, adapted by Ana Mckellar. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image is Future food: insects (Krabi, Thailand 2015) by Paul Arps (Flickr), licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.
Introduction to Chinese Philosophy
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Introduction to Chinese Philosophy

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This open educational resource contains PowerPoint slides for a lifelong learning course which introduces the major schools of classical Chinese philosophy, including Confucianism and Daoism. Philosophical texts are approached in English translation, focusing on how the ancient Chinese thought about philosophical topics which concern us today. The course is intended for adult learners and taught at university foundation level (Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework level 7). Introduction to Chinese Philosophy is offered as part of the Short Courses programme at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Open Learning. For further information, visit Short Courses. Learning outcomes On completion of this course, students will be able to: identify different approaches in classical Chinese philosophy; describe the positions of Chinese philosophers on philosophical issues; read and analyse extracts of Chinese philosophical texts in English translation. Content This resource bundle includes four PowerPoint presentations. Please click the links below to download them. Confucianism I: General Background and the Analects Confucianism II: Mencius and Xunzi Daoism I: Daodejing Daoism II: Zhuangzi You can also find open access English translations of the texts (with the exception of the Xunzi) from the links below: Analects: http://www.acmuller.net/con-dao/analects.html https://ctext.org/analects Mencius: http://www.acmuller.net/con-dao/mencius.html https://ctext.org/mengzi Daodejing: http://www.acmuller.net/con-dao/daodejing.html https://ctext.org/dao-de-jing Zhuangzi: https://terebess.hu/english/chuangtzu.html https://ctext.org/zhuangzi To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Lee Wilson All content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image: silk painting depicting a man riding a dragon, public domain image on Wikimedia Commons.
Germs, Disease, Vaccines & Chemical Reactions
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Germs, Disease, Vaccines & Chemical Reactions

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Germs, Disease, Vaccines & Chemical Reactions has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons is to increase knowledge and awareness during and after the covid-19 pandemic and help support the pupils in developing fair tests and inquiry skills. In each of the four/five sessions, the scene is set by Jason Leitch, Clinical Director asking pupils to act as investigators to solve a problem. The first introduces four types of microbe and where they lurk in schools. The second is a comparison experiment using a plant spray to mimic sneezing. The third session explores vaccines and fair testing on chemical reactions. The final session uses a card game to explain pandemics and global diseases patterns. A lab-book is enclosed with optional additional worksheets. The Teacher’s guide offers help with the experiments (including photos) and basic science on the resource in addition to hyperlinked resources. All sessions can be linked to the covid-19 pandemic if wished. Help and resources are to be found in the Teacher’s Guide. Contents in this resource • Extensive Teacher’s guide o Lesson Plan o Resource list and safety information o ‘Basic Facts and online resources’ (hyperlinked) o ‘Help with the Investigation’ (includes photos) • PowerPoint presentations. Included in these are the letter (‘hook’) from the current National Clinical Director, Professor Jason Leitch. Here are some of his videos (In the Young Scot one, he introduces himself) • Lab Book (short reflective notebook) • Learner worksheet for ‘sneeze experiment’ (session 2) • Pandemic cards (for photocopying in session 4) • Suggestions for extension **Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence ** SCN 2-19a, SCN 2-20a, SCN 2-20b, SCN 1-13a Second Level: Sciences Inquiry and Investigation skills: SOC 2-14a, SOC 2-19a, MTH 2-21a This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit http://www.open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Stacey Fullerton, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. OpenCovid4Ed