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University of Edinburgh Open.Ed

Free open educational resources from the University of Edinburgh to download and adapt for primary and secondary teaching.

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Free open educational resources from the University of Edinburgh to download and adapt for primary and secondary teaching.
Introduction to the Brain
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Introduction to the Brain

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This resource contains a workshop with activities about the structure and functions of the brain and what happens when it goes wrong. It also contains short biographies of the two co-authors and details of their academic involvement in psychology. It is intended for learners studying the Scottish National 5 Psychology curriculum. Learning outcomes Name and locate the different lobes of the brain. Understand the functions of each brain, and their real-life applications. Actively work in a team with a common goal. Understand the implications of brain damage, such as the case of Phineas Gage. In this resource This resource bundle includes pdf and editable versions of the following: Practitioner Notes: contains in-depth notes as to the characteristics and composition of the brain, along with several support videos that may benefit learners. Also included are the rules for the “Brain Game” Brain Cut Out: a single page with a coloured image of the brain, as required by the “Brain Game” Brain Function and Lobe Names: for use in the “Brain Game” Clue Cards: a set of clue cards for use in the “Brain Game” Clue Card Answers: the corresponding answers to go along with the Clue Cards in the “Brain Game” Meet the Psychologists: a single page document with a short description and picture of the two authors of this resource This resource was created as part of Psychology Outreach and Engagement which allows undergraduate psychology students to develop new projects aimed at meeting the needs of local community partners as part of their degree. This resource was developed in partnership with Craigroyston Community High School, Edinburgh. Lorna Camus, an MA Hons Psychology student and Agniete Pocyte, a BSc Hons Psychology student, produced and delivered the resource with the help of Eric Freund, a teacher at Craigroyston Community High School. We are indebted to Eric, but we would also like to thank his 1A and his 2C classes for their participation and enthusiasm. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Lorna Camus and Agniete Pocyte, adapted by Kay Douglas and Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under the CC BY 4.0 license.
Graph Theory: Puzzles and Games
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Graph Theory: Puzzles and Games

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This resource is a set of worksheets about games and puzzles based on simple concepts in graph theory. The resource covers: the seven bridges of Konigsberg, the Shannon Switching game and graph vertex colouring. The resource is aimed at a general public level as formal mathematical knowledge is not required beyond counting, but younger audiences would need more guidance. This resource aims to provide a very basic introduction to graph theory. The activities are designed to get participants to become familiar with how problems can be simplified into graph theory problems and how that may be used to find solutions. In this resource: Graph Colouring: solving scheduling and allocating problems using graphs Instructor guide 4 Party Problems 3 Radio Problems Rivers and Bridges: based on the Bridges of Konigsberg problem Instructor guide Matching activity Worksheets for 4 real cities (including Konigsberg) Shannon Switching game: a simple game which is played on a graph Instructor guide PowerPoint explaining the game (with presentation guide) 4 Virus games Simple examples Design your own graph to win the game This resource was originally developed for the Edinburgh International Science Festival with the School of Mathematics. Authors: Francesca Iezzi, Ana McKellar, Lukas Cerny, Benedetta Mussati and Patrick Kinnear (with additional input from other members of the Maths Outreach Team), adapted for wider audiences by Ana McKellar. Unless otherwise stated, all content (including original images) is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image is Four Color Problem by Jeff Kubina (Flickr) is licenced under CC BY-SA 2.0.
Kind Clothing: Sustainable Fashion (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Kind Clothing: Sustainable Fashion (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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Kind Clothing is a project written for Girlguides, designed by Hannah Fieldsend. It aims to fit into the exciting and varied programme suited to inspire and challenge Girlguides ages 10-14. Any groups looking to achieve their ‘Global Awareness’ guiding essential can use Kind Clothing as part of their programme, and it covers topics such as Sustainability, Environmental Issues and Practical Skills. It consists of three interactive sessions that introduce the idea of Fast Fashion and link it to the concepts of the environment and sustainability. Throughout the sessions there is an overarching project where the girlguides recycle a piece of clothing into a DIY drawstring bag. Learning outcomes: Girlguiding Programme Session 1 Express myself: innovate, communicate Session 2 Express myself: innovate, communicate Skills for my future: live smart Session 3 Know myself: reflect, network Skills for my future: live smart Take action: make change, influence Scottish Curriculum for Excellence Learning Objectives: Session 1 Literacy: LIT 2-07a, I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. Environment: SOC 3-08a, I can identify the possible consequences of an environmental issue and make informed suggestions about ways to manage the impact. Session 2 Planetary Processes: SCN 3-05b, I can explain some of the processes, which contribute to climate change and discuss the possible impact of atmospheric change on the survival of living things. Environment: SOC 2-08a, I can discuss the environmental impact of human activity and suggest ways in which we can live in a more environmentally responsible way. Session 3 People in Society: SOC 2-20a, Through exploring ethnical trading, I can understand how people’s basic needs are the same round the world, discussing why some societies are more able to meet these needs than others. People in Society: SOC 3-19a, I can describe how the interdependence of countries affects levels of development, considering the effects on people’s lives. This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. This resource was originally developed for girlguides, and was successfully run with a girlguide group. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Hannah Fieldsend, adapted by Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY 4.0 license.
Earth’s materials: volcanic eruptions (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Earth’s materials: volcanic eruptions (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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Four lessons giving an introduction to volcanoes and various aspects of geology: Volcano Experiments, “The Debate to Save Heimaey”, Volcanic Eruption Research, and a Field Trip. Educational Level 2 and 3 (SCN 2-17a, SCN 2-19a, SOC 2-07b, SOC 3-07a, TCH 2-02a, LIT 2-02a, EXA 2-14a) This resource makes use of a variety of educational approaches to introduce learners to volcanoes and various aspects of geology. There are four lessons in this resource that lead on from one another. Lesson 1: Introduction to Volcanos Lesson 2: Eruption of Eldfell - The Debate to Save Heimaey Lesson 3: Volcanic Eruption Research Lesson 4: Arthur’s Seat Field Trip Created as part of the School of Geosciences’ Outreach Programme, which allows students in their final year to work in partnership with a local school to develop a set of lesson plans. Author: Isla Simmons Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC-BY 4.0 license. Cover image is: Fissure eruption in Holurhraun (Iceland), 13. September 2014 by Joschenbacher (Wikimedia), licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.
Stories from Hindu Traditions
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Stories from Hindu Traditions

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the stories of various Hindu traditions. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six stories in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to the Mahabharata (or Mahābhārata, pronounced ma-haa baa-ra-ta), one of the great epics of India. The Descent of the Ganges also has an accompanying PowerPoint presentation for illustrative purposes. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover image is Mahabharata, 1852, Miniature 11, from The University of Edinburgh collection, CC BY 3.0.
Plastic in the Ocean (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Plastic in the Ocean (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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Plastic in the Ocean is a project aimed at educating learners about the negative environmental effects of plastic. Over the course of four lessons, the learners are taught what plastic is, why it is bad for the environment and what can be done to address this environmental problem. As well as fun and interactive lessons the learners are given the opportunity to explore the local area collecting litter/plastic, putting what they have learned in the classroom lessons into context with the real-world. Learning outcomes Science - Earth Materials SCN 2-17a: Having explored the substances that make up Earth’s surface, I can compare some of their characteristics and uses. Science - Topical Science SCN 2-20a: Through research and discussion, I have an appreciation of the contribution that individuals are making to scientific discovery and invention and the impact this has made on society. SCN 2-20b: I can report and comment on current scientific news items to develop my knowledge and understanding of topical science. Social Sciences – People, Place and the Environment SOC 2-08a: I can discuss the environmental impact of human activity and suggest ways in which we can live in a more environmentally responsible way. Technologies – Technology Developments in Society and Business TCH 2-06a: I can analyse how lifestyles can impact on the environment and Earth’s resources, and can make suggestions about how to live in a more sustainable way. TCH 2-07a: I can make suggestions as to how individuals and organisations may use technologies to support sustainability and reduce the impact on our environment. Expressive Arts – Art and Design EXA 2-03a: I can create and present work that shows developing skill in using the visual elements and concepts. EXA 2-05a: Inspired by a range of stimuli, I can express and communicate my ideas, thoughts and feelings through activities within art and design. This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. This resource was originally designed to be implemented in Queensferry Primary School, located in South Queensferry, Edinburgh. The lessons were taught to Primary 5, Second Level. Author: Hannah Newberry, adapted by Andrew Ferguson. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image by Wild0ne on Pixabay is licensed under the Pixabay License. Has been cropped and overlay graphics added.
Christian Parables teaching resource.
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Christian Parables teaching resource.

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These are teaching resources for use in Religious and Moral Education, and describe some of the parables of the Christian faith as told in the New Testament. Although the resources have been created in consultation with Education Scotland and Scottish school teachers, we hope they will also be useful to teachers in other parts of the UK (or even beyond). The resource is structured to meet the Education Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence standard for RME. The resource is divided according to the three structuring principles of the experiences and outcomes for RME in Scotland: Beliefs, Values and Issues, and Practices and Traditions. Keywords are also provided to indicate the particular relevance of the story. The file contains six parables in PDF format, sorted by the principles stated above, and an introduction to parables. Resources provided as part of the project Approaching Religion Through Story are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. They are free to use, copy and adapt for all non-commercial purposes. More RME resources can be found at http://www.storyandreligion.div.ed.ac.uk/schools/resources/ , and more OERs from the University of Edinburgh can be found at open.ed.ac.uk . Cover images is Parable of the hidden treasure, by possibly Rembrandt; possibly Gerard Dou, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)
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Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)

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Teacher and student resource pack covering the effects and causes of cardiovascular disease and medical methods for preventing it. Educational Level: Higher (AS levels) (CfE Higher Human Biology, physiology and health) Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a class of disorders that refers to any disease affecting the heart or the blood vessels. It can also be called circulatory disease. This resource pack focuses on the most common cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Other types of cardiovascular disease (CVD) include congenital heart disease (i.e. structural defects in the heart or vessels that are present when at birth), heart valve disease (i.e. disease that affects the valves that control blood flow in the heart) and infective diseases of the heart (such as rheumatic fever). This resource pack will not cover these diseases. Learning outcomes Covers the process of atherosclerosis, thrombosis, causes and effects of peripheral vascular disorders and control of cholesterol levels in the body. This resource was created as part of the as part of the Edinburgh Medical School outreach education. Authors: Amy Gray, Simon Walker & Kay Douglas. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY 4.0 license. Cover image is by Kay Douglas and is licensed under a CC BY license.
Psychology Research Methods
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Psychology Research Methods

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‘Psych Research Methods’ is a resource that ties into the Scottish National 5 Psychology curriculum. It includes detailed presentation slides and notes covering 2 lessons, including student worksheet and in class activities. Key words: Psychology, Research Cover image is
Exploring Escher – Mathematics Printmaking Workshop (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Exploring Escher – Mathematics Printmaking Workshop (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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This resource provides materials to run a workshop about Escher’s printmaking, exploring the artist, his process and the mathematics underlying his work. There is a practical art element which involves participants designing and printing their own piece of work. This resource aims to show participants a creative side to mathematics. Knowledge of symmetry (rotational and reflectional) is assumed but also explained within the resource. The workshop is aimed at general public level - it is suitable for anyone with a basic understanding of geometry and symmetry. Learning outcomes: MTH 3-19a, MTH 4-19a, EXA 4-02a, EXA 4-06a To learn about the life and work of Escher To understand how mathematics influenced Escher’s work To learn about symmetries and wallpaper patterns To be able to identify the wallpaper group of a tessellation design To learn how to make lino prints In this resource: Workshop plan Part 1: Presentation Part 2: Designing a tessellating pattern Part 3: Printmaking Part 4: The mathematics behind your work Presentation slides Part 1: Who was Escher? Part 2: Regular divisions of the plane Part 3: Escher and mathematics Presentation guide Presentation content This resource was created as part of the Festival of Creative Learning by the Maths Outreach Team with the School of Mathematics. Author: Mairi Walker, Ana McKellar, Lukas Cerny and Benedetta Mussati. Except where otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image is a photograph from the original workshop courtesy of the University of Edinburgh School of Mathematics.
Mental Health & Wellbeing Guidance Booklet
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Mental Health & Wellbeing Guidance Booklet

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This resource is a booklet with a collection of strategies for improving mental health and wellbeing, a list of youth support agencies and a section with templates to aid the completion of some strategies. The target audience for this resource is anyone aged 12+ Aimed at Level 3 and above. The booklet aims to satisfy the HWB 3-02a, HWB 3-03a and HWB 2-06a benchmarks in the Health and wellbeing curriculum and includes a combination of strategies in different areas: Sleeping Stress and anxiety Self-esteem and body positivity Socialising Healthy lifestyle Online safety Author: Maria Teixeira-Dias at the University of Edinburgh. Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
Food Production and Insects (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Food Production and Insects (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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This resource is a set of 5 lesson plans with slides, an experiment (with worksheets for analysing the results) and assessment items. The target audience for this resource is for learners aged between 14 and 16 years. Entomophagy is the human consumption of insects as food - it represents a sustainable alternative to the environmentally destructive effects of livestock based protein. The lessons presented here are based around a project designed to test the food conversion efficiency and water footprint of mealworms. The lessons are presented as 5 individual lessons each 50 minutes in length. They are designed to be incorporated into the school’s curriculum surrounding the food production unit for National 5 students. Providing that classes are taught when the food production unit would normally be delivered, these lessons can act as a detailed blueprint of how to teach the two related subjects in tandem. This resource aims to cover the following Curriculum for Excellence benchmarks: SOC 4-09a - Having evaluated the role of agriculture in the production of food and raw material, I can draw reasoned conclusions about the environmental impacts and sustainability. SCN 4-03a - Through investigating the nitrogen cycle and evaluating results from practical experiments, I can suggest a design for a fertiliser, taking account of its environmental impact. (Particularly the points associated with “Explores and explains the possible impact of the use of fertilisers, for example, algal blooms.”) SCN 4-20a - I have researched new developments in science and can explain how their current or future applications might impact on modern life.   This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course at the University of Edinburgh and was originally developed for the Trinity Academy in Edinburgh. Author: Danny Ashton, adapted by Ana Mckellar. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. Cover image is Future food: insects (Krabi, Thailand 2015) by Paul Arps (Flickr), licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.
Bees and Biodiversity (Multidisciplinary Learning)
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Bees and Biodiversity (Multidisciplinary Learning)

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Three lessons on the contribution that bees make to our planet on the topics of pollination, bee diversity, and hexagons in the bee hive (STEM activity). Lesson 1: Flower structure and pollination Lesson 2: Types of bees Lesson 3: Why bee hives are made up of hexagons Includes lesson plans, activities, presentations and worksheets. Curriculum for Excellence: SCN 1-02a, SCN 1-02b, SCN 2-01a, MTH 1-16a, MTH 1-16b, MTH 2-16a. Author: Natasha Michaelides, School of GeoSciences at The University of Edinburgh, in collaboration with Ratho Primary School, with thanks to Amy Dixon (class teacher, science specialist and STEM advisor).
Environmental Sciences: Graphs
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Environmental Sciences: Graphs

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A resource for 1st to 2nd year undergraduate levels which details the use of graphs in the field of environmental science. May be of use to teachers of geography, the sciences or even as an application of mathematics. Of use for helping to achieve problem solving, data handling and scientific investigation learning outcomes. All content released under a CC BY license. Authors: Kay Douglas & Sophie Flack © University of Edinburgh Keywords Science/data handling / graphs Biology/data handling/graphs Environmental science /data handling /graphs OER, EdUniOERGeo
Guide to Drawing and Interpreting Graphs in Geosciences
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Guide to Drawing and Interpreting Graphs in Geosciences

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A resource for pupils studying at SCQF Level 6-7, (Scottish Higher, AS-Level, and above) which details the use of graphs in the field of geoscience. May be of use to teachers of geography, the sciences or even as an application of mathematics. Of use for helping to achieve problem solving, data handling and scientific investigation learning outcomes. All content released under a CC BY license. Authors: Kay Douglas & Sophie Flack © University of Edinburgh Keywords Science/data handling / graphs Biology/data handling/graphs Environmental science /data handling /graphs OER, EdUniOERGeo
Sow it, Grow it, Taste it (Interdisciplinary Learning)
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Sow it, Grow it, Taste it (Interdisciplinary Learning)

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An interdisciplinary approach to growing and tasting vegetables using experiences and outcomes in the sciences, health and wellbeing, numeracy and literacy. Young learners love to be practical and this resource encourages them to grow plants from seed, fruit and vegetable scraps. The learners are encouraged to taste what they grow, where possible, and to discuss their taste preferences. The additional activities suggested include possible scientific investigations, planting up old wellies, growing hanging baskets with salad & herbs or planting bulbs for a present. Encouraging young learners to recognise common fruits and vegetables and consuming five portions of fruit and vegetables daily is included. The Education Scotland website has a series of very useful links about ‘The Way We Grow and Catch Food in Scotland’. Suitable for Early Education under the Scottish CfE. Keywords: Biodiversity and Interdependence, Nutrition, Safe and Hygenic Practice, Food and the Consumer, Creating texts, Data and analysis, Number and Number Processes, ICT to enhance learning. EdUniOER Cover image is Raphanus sativus, red radish variant by Martin Kozák (Wikimedia), licensed under CC0.
Wonder in Magic  - Air Pressure
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Wonder in Magic - Air Pressure

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This resource is  the first of a set of  4 lesson plans with STEM activities based around a group of 10-12 year olds, wanting to explain the science and maths behind magic. This first session teaches AIR PRESSURE, a gravitational force. (Other sessions involve PROBABILITY, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, STATIC ELECTRICITY. ) Wonder in Magic has been created as a teaching resource for the City of Edinburgh Council’s ‘Curiosity Club’, an Intervention Strategy initiative that is currently operating in Council schools. The focus of the four planned lessons of Wonder in Magic is to explain the ‘magic’ behind science and maths activities. This is the first on air pressure, a gravitational force. The second has an activity on probability. The third involves chemical reactions and the fourth static electricity. There is an optional activity (session 5) on showcasing the knowledge and skills obtained in Wonder in Magic. You can find all of these in our TES Shop for free download and re-use. The log-book (‘Book of Spells’), general teaching notes, completion certificate and letter (‘hook’) are included with all resources. This is the first on air pressure, a gravitational force. This bundle includes: extensive teacher notes bundle includes PDF and editable versions of the following: Air Pressure – A Magical Fountain - contents for each lesson includes: Resource list Learning Intentions Shared success criteria Relevant Es&Os Assessment Methods Lesson Plan General resources ‘Hook’ letter from the Head Teacher of Scotland’s Magic School Log-book (aka Book of Spells) Completion Certificate General Teaching Notes Learning outcomes in the Curriculum for Excellence and associated benchmark SCN 2-08a: I have collaborated in investigations to compare magnetic, electrostatic and gravitational forces and have explored their practical applications. y investigating how friction, including air resistance, affects motion, I can suggest ways to improve efficiency in moving objects. (Explores and explains air pressure, a gravitational force) LIT 2-07a: I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own. (Asks and responds to a range of questions, including literal, inferential and evaluative questions, to demonstrate understanding of spoken texts.) This resource was created as part of the GeoScience Outreach Course, which is a 4th year undergraduate course in the School of GeoSciences aiming to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own science communication and engagement project. To find more Open Educational Resources from the University of Edinburgh, visit open.ed.ac.uk. Author: Philippa Johnston, adapted by Kay Douglas and Charlie Farley. Unless otherwise stated, all content is released under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.
Plants: what they need to grow and why we need them
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Plants: what they need to grow and why we need them

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This resource is aimed at Level 2 students studying plant germination and decay by microorganisms. Through this resource school learners develop their scientific knowledge, skills and scientific literacy in addition to honing their practical skills. This resource promotes appreciation for the environment and includes five activities, which relate to the second level Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) Experiences and Outcomes and Benchmarks. Created as part of the School of Geosciences’ Outreach Programme, which allows students in their final year to work in partnership with a local school to develop a set of lesson plans. Author: Sara Thornton and Tabitha Ewing Unless otherwise stated all content is released under a CC-BY 4.0 license Keywords: plants, environment, micro-organisms, ecosystem, photosynthesis, germination, seeds Cover image Plassiflora seedling by BlueRidgeKitties on Flickr under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.
Environmental Sciences: Descriptive Statistics
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Environmental Sciences: Descriptive Statistics

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A resource for pupils studying at 1st to 2nd year undergraduate levels which details the use of descriptive statistics in the field of geoscience and ecology. May be of use to teachers of geography, ecology, the sciences or even as an application in a mathematics or statistics course. Of use for helping to achieve problem solving, data handling and numeracy learning outcomes. All content released under a CC BY license. Authors: Kay Douglas and Sophie Flack © University of Edinburgh Keywords: Biology/data and statistics/data handling, Environmental science/data and statistics/data handling, Chemistry/data and statistics/data handling University of Edinburgh, EdUniOERGeo
Environmental Sciences: Scientific Investigation
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Environmental Sciences: Scientific Investigation

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A resource for pupils studying at Aimed at 1st to 2nd year undergraduate levels which details scientific investigation and the methodology used in the field of geoscience and ecology. May be of use to teachers of geography, ecology, and science (particularly biology). Of use for helping to achieve problem solving, data handling and scientific investigation learning outcomes. All content released under a CC BY license. Authors: Kay Douglas & Sophie Flack © University of Edinburgh Keywords: Biology/ Investigation/AH investigation Chemistry/Investigation/AH Investigation Environmental Science/investigation/AH investigation OER, EdUniOERGeo