Hero image

One Stop English and Humanities Shop

Average Rating3.96
(based on 34 reviews)

Unique resources created by an experienced Secondary English and History teacher. These are academically rigorous resources that target children between 13 and 18 years of age.

366Uploads

113k+Views

14k+Downloads

Unique resources created by an experienced Secondary English and History teacher. These are academically rigorous resources that target children between 13 and 18 years of age.
World War Two – the Kokoda track
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

World War Two – the Kokoda track

(0)
A set of PowerPoints which I think History teachers will find helpful. If you use them, and like them, please come and give me a positive star rating / review. Constructive criticism is also appreciated. PowerPoint 1: Kokoda lesson 1 • context o What happened after Pearl Harbor? o Japanese imperialism • Where is New Guinea? What was it called back then? • What were conditions like on the Kokoda track? • Viewing activities clips from Getaway, the 2006 Kokoda film • The experiences of Australian soldiers in the Kokoda campaign o*** Number of Australians killed or injured in Papua New Guinea o The Kokoda track and what it looks like o Images of the golden stairs o Dysentery o What they ate o What they carried o The psychological impact* • Links to other sources (including videos) which you might like to explore with your class (with descriptions) Homework Sheet Definitions to find for a glossary, a photograph (source) to view and answer questions about, two written sources to view and answer questions about PowerPoint 2: Kokoda lesson 2 • The four groups who fought in New Guinea in 1942 (Australians, Americans, New Guineans and The Japanese) • View an SBS news story about a fuzzy wuzzy angel being reunited with an Australian that he saved • Who were the ‘fuzzy wuzzy angels?’ • The Japanese offensive continued • How the Kokoda campaign ended
Australian Stereotypes - Crocodile Dundee
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Australian Stereotypes - Crocodile Dundee

(1)
Two PowerPoints for a 9 English Unit. The first PowerPoint includes a synopsis of the film and the film trailer is embedded. This is followed by a range of clips and viewing questions. It also includes information about how Indigenous Australians are portrayed in the film. Additionally, there is a section on exploring key quotes. Students have to pick out the slang and the beliefs of the protagonist which are indicated in the quote. The second PowerPoint is a paragraph writing lesson. It takes students through the various stereotypes in the film and includes some pre-writing (planning) steps. It reviews the PEEEL paragraph structure. It includes some scaffolding (suggested sentence starters) along with an example paragraph (which is colour coded to indicate which section it addresses). After this activity, there is information about modality and some examples of high and low modality words. There is also some information about linking words.
Australian Stereotypes - The Drover's Wife (Henry Lawson)
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Australian Stereotypes - The Drover's Wife (Henry Lawson)

(0)
For many decades women were marginalised from texts about life in the bush. If they were mentioned at all they were the wives waiting back at the homestead and played no real role in the text. One exception is the short story ‘The Drovers Wife’ (1894) written by Henry Lawson. This PPT and Work Sheet guide students to read and analyse the story and the effect of its language features and descriptions on readers.
Australian identity - Representations of Indigenous Australians
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Australian identity - Representations of Indigenous Australians

(0)
3 resources used in a 9 English unit. 1) A homework sheet which includes the poem 'Then and Now' by Oodgeroo Noonuccal and comprehension questions which are designed to help students begin to analyse the text. This poem touches on the dispossession of land and the consequences for the poet and her people. 2) A PowerPoint which teaches visual source analysis using the picture book 'The Rabbits' by John Marsden (illustrated by Shaun Tan). Students have to respond to the images by answering the following questions: What do you feel about the imagery? What does it mean to you? What is the idea of Australian identity portrayed in the picture? Afterwards, the PPT explains that this story is an allegory. The PowerPoint also includes some examples of Australian slang (as this is part of a stereotypes unit). 3) A PowerPoint which points out that for a long time there were “entrenched negative stereotypes” about Aboriginal people in Australia and how the media’s focus on negative Aboriginal issues creates much hurt when it presents the problems of individual Aboriginal people as problems of all Indigenous Australians. It explores the negative stereotypes about Indigenous people as shown in Bran Neu Dae and the positive attributes shown in The Sapphires. The clips I have selected from Bran Neu Dae are humorous but touch on serious issues and often generate good classroom discussions.
Religion: An introduction to the Catholic Social Teachings
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Religion: An introduction to the Catholic Social Teachings

(0)
A PowerPoint designed for a year 9 Theology unit on Social Justice. It introduces students to each of the Catholic Social Teachings (What they are and how they can be upheld). This can be a useful starting point for discussion of students own values or can be used to then encourage students to identify scripture which supports each of these CST's.
Ned Kelly English Unit - Was Ned a Hero or a Villain? - Focusing on events from Chapter 4 of Black
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Ned Kelly English Unit - Was Ned a Hero or a Villain? - Focusing on events from Chapter 4 of Black

(0)
This lesson was designed for the second phase of the unit where students are preparing to write a persuasive text about Ned Kelly. This lesson focuses on reading the events in Chapter Four of Black Snake, responding to questions and considering whether Ned’s actions make him a hero or a villain (or a victim of circumstances). There is a video excerpt of the shootout at Stringybark Creek (from the Heath Ledger film). There is also a clip from the Victoria Police which is intended as a memorial for the policemen killed in action by the Kelly Gang members. It also includes information about the two letters Ned famously wrote expressing why he turned to a life of crime (The Cameron Letter and the Jerilderie Letter). It concludes with information about how the public opinion of Ned shifted from a negative one to a more positive one after the 1960s. The lesson tries to present all points of view so that students can make up their own minds about Ned Kelly and whether he deserves to be held up as an Aussie icon. Handout - proofreading activity (an excerpt from the novel). Part of a set of resources created for a year 7 English class in Australia (ACARA syllabus). The other resources are also available in my store - lrigb4. Designed for use in 70 minute lessons (with extra activities as a back up if the class is advanced). The focus text is ‘Black Snake: The Daring of Ned Kelly’ by Carole Wilkinson.
Social and Community Studies - Gender and Identity - Gender Stereotypes in the media
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Social and Community Studies - Gender and Identity - Gender Stereotypes in the media

(0)
Part of a set of resources created for a senior Social & Community studies class in Australia (QCAA syllabus). The other resources are also available in my store - Aussie_Resources. Designed for use in 70 minute lessons. The end of term assessment for this unit was a 90 minute short response examination. A PowerPoint which begins with a warm up practice exam question where students must make inferences about someone based on a photograph of them and some brief information about their occupation and interests. This is followed by a reflection to see how confident students felt about this task. Afterwards the term ‘stereotype’ is defined along with some information about why people stereotype. Students are to copy the definition of ‘gender stereotypes’ into their glossary. There is a viewing activity that explains this concept further. Looking at some stereotypes e.g. which gender is dressed in pink vs blue. This segues to a discussion about how advertisements target viewers of particular genders. There is a clip for students to view and discuss (Top 10 Unnecessarily Gendered Products). This is followed by some visual literacy activities where students have to analyse a range of advertisements and explain their meaning (as this is a skill they must have for their exam). Some of these advertisements are quite sexual and lend well to discussions about the impact of advertisements on body image. They can also cause society to continue to accept misogynistic views of women. There is also a sample advertisement related question for students to view and another one for them to attempt to answer. If time permits, at the end of the lesson, there is an interesting TED talk to watch.
10 English: Language features in the news
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

10 English: Language features in the news

(0)
Part of a set of resources created for a year 10 English class in Australia (ACARA syllabus). The other resources are also available in my store – Aussie_Resources. A PowerPoint designed for use in a 70 minute lesson. This lesson begins by defining what a representation is and why they are so powerful. The variance in portrayals of Meghan Markle and Princess Kate are used to prompt discussion. This is followed by a series of slides about the language features that students can look for when analysing news stories. The slides include definitions and examples. Language features include: similes, metaphors, appeal to authority, appeal to emotion, connotations, emotive language, hyperbole, repetition, inclusive language, omission, groups of three, rhetorical questions, alliteration, idioms and hashtags. The lesson concludes with reading an example article about Novak Djokovic and considering whether it paints him in a positive / negative light. There are a series of questions to help students to analyse this text.
Creative writing lesson - Setting and narrative voice in crime fiction
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Creative writing lesson - Setting and narrative voice in crime fiction

(0)
PowerPoint: This lesson includes a definition of setting and tips for descriptive writing. There is Students will learn how to develop setting in their story by reading extracts from a very famous crime story called ‘Memento Mori’ to see how the author developed setting and character simultaneously. There is a lot to be learned from this text as it is an unusual story told in a nonlinear fashion. There are two distinct voices used – one is in second person, the other is in third person. As the protagonist only has a 10-second memory span, the third person voice often re-establishes the setting (but pointing out different things each time). This serves to develop the character and create suspense. Extracts from the text are also discussed in terms of how the author establishes the time of day and atmosphere along with the setting…
TADPOLE acronym for analysing sources + Pearl Harbor
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

TADPOLE acronym for analysing sources + Pearl Harbor

(0)
A PowerPoint that goes through an acronym which can be used to analyse sources (with specific examples from WW2). This is followed by content knowledge: Japanese Imperialism and the lead-up to Pearl Harbor, The source of US conflict with Japan & Japan's strategy.
Patch Adams and the Catholic Social Teachings
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Patch Adams and the Catholic Social Teachings

(0)
Two resources for use in a theology class 1) A PowerPoint defining the various Catholic Social Teachings. 2) A booklet for use at the end of the term when students view Patch Adams. It includes viewing questions including questions about the CST's.
Crime fiction: Hard Boiled Fiction
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Crime fiction: Hard Boiled Fiction

(1)
Introduction to the hard-boiled genre of crime fiction (Set in1930s - 1950s America) This PowerPoint examines the genre conventions of hard-boiled fiction, the typical protagonist of these tales & events that were occurring in American society at the time these tales were written, and how these influenced these texts. Students will watch a trailer for The Maltese Falcon Trailer (a famous example). The movie of The Maltese Falcon is dated 1941, during the War, but the story was published in 1930: it’s a tale of the roaring ‘20s. The PPT also includes a trailer for a recent example (the HBO television series Boardwalk Empire) which recreates this era.
Worksheet - the difference between objective and subjective texts
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Worksheet - the difference between objective and subjective texts

(1)
This worksheet can be used as a one on one tutoring resource. Alternatively, you can take activities from here to use as fast finishers or homework activities. This document introduces students to key terms like fact, opinion and embellishment. It includes sentences and paragraphs and challenges students to identify whether they are subjective/objective. It also provides some information about zoos and asks students to write a subjective and objective paragraph about the topic. The second section explores how verbs, adverbs and well-constructed, extended noun groups can position the reader to form an opinion or judge a person. It gives an example of a famous Australian and shows how by changing a few words you can change the connotation of the text. It includes comprehension questions to check the students understanding. In the third section, a subjective newspaper article about the Vietnam war is included for students to analyse. There are comprehension questions which follow this. The final section introduces students to the concept of tone and gives them a list of different words to describe the tone of a text. Students then look at an advertisement and have to suggest the tone. Subsequently, they read a bias newspaper article and answer questions about this. Finally, there is a writing activity for students which encourages them to write persuasively.
Feminist Movements - 11 Modern History – British first wave feminists – Suffragists & Suffragettes
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Feminist Movements - 11 Modern History – British first wave feminists – Suffragists & Suffragettes

(0)
A PowerPoint for the first lesson of the term – an introduction to feminism and the4 British suffragettes. It begins with a basic definition of feminism for students to add to their glossary + the class word wall. Students know they need to copy down whatever text is underlined in my slides. It is followed by a clip from Horrible Histories (on ClickView) about the Suffragettes. This is followed by an opportunity to discuss what students already know about this topic. Students are assigned a homework research task – due the following week. There is a clip from the 1964 Mary Poppins film showing Mrs Banks – a 1st wave feminist. The 4 waves of feminism are summarised before zooming in on Britain’s first wave. There is a YouTube video from 1913, when militant suffragette Emily Wilding Davison threw herself under King George V’s racehorse at a major public event. She died of her injuries and became a suffragette martyr. An extract from Mary Wollstonecraft’s influential text A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792) is presented and students must summarise the key ideas. Another primary source an extract from The Declaration of the Rights of Woman (1791) is provided for comparison. There is information about the hunger strikes which were used as a form of protest & the force feeding methods used by the authorities. There are excerpts of prisoner testimonies. An image of a primary artefact (a hunger strike medal) is displayed. Information about some of the advances women achieved in the early 20th century is provided including information about when British women achieved the vote. The trailer for the 2015 film Suffragette is shown and a synopsis is provided. This lends itself well to a discussion of the personal implications of joining the movement for women at the time. To conclude the lesson, students are encouraged to reflect on their learning and compile their own definition of first wave feminism – with examples. Resources designed for the new senior Modern History syllabus (implemented in QLD in 2019). Designed as part of a unit entitled Women’s movements since 1893, which has the scope to span from when Women’s suffrage in New Zealand became law to the present. I decided to focus on the Second Wave of Feminism for our assessment (while briefly touching on the other waves of feminism).The other resources are also available in my store - lrigb4. The end of term assessment for this unit was an essay under exam conditions. As the unit was taught in term 4, it was a shorter, 6 week unit.
11 Modern History - Vietnam Independence Movement – How to write a key inquiry question
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

11 Modern History - Vietnam Independence Movement – How to write a key inquiry question

(0)
This lesson (PowerPoint) was designed to have a short explicit teaching episode at the start followed by for students to develop key inquiry question. This lesson was a review of the key skills required for writing a question for their research essay. It begins with a summary of the assessment task. This is followed by looking at an example key question from QCAA for a different topic (The Cold War). Beneath this is some annotations from QCAA explaining how this addresses the ‘Devising and Conducting’ portion of the criteria. There is some advice about writing a key inquiry question and a graphic organiser showing how you could dot point ideas before narrowing this into a question (examples about the American Civil Rights Movement). There are also example questions written to demonstrate / centre on each of the 7 historical concepts. This is followed by an example key question for our topic (Vietnamese Independence Movement). Students must identify whether it is an open or closed question. They are provided with some information about each question type to help them make this decision. Three more questions (of varying degrees of suitability) are provided for students to evaluate against the criteria. Afterwards students have time to write their first draft of their key question (due the following week for feedback). If time permits, there is feedback about the Tet offensive and the famous photograph entitled ‘Saigon Execution’ which they were to research for their homework task. ** NB: Resources designed for the new senior Modern History syllabus (implemented in QLD in 2019). The content would also be useful more broadly for students in other states and countries with an interest in the Vietnamese Independence Movement (1945-1975). The other resources are also available in my store - lrigb4. The end of term assessment for this unit was an essay.**
Social and Community Studies – Legally, it could be you!  – QCIA assessment task
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Social and Community Studies – Legally, it could be you! – QCIA assessment task

(0)
A QCIA cover sheet recommending adjustments to be made and individual learning goals to be assessed (for QCIA learners who have learning difficulties which prevent them for doing the assessment as it was) A modified task sheet for students on a modified program (called QCIA students in QLD). Depending on the student they can opt to do a speech with a shorter time limit (in front of a smaller audience) or a spoken discussion with the teacher. The modified Inquiry booklet for these QCIA students. Key changes include: for the definitions and explanations section at the front there are grey textboxes which contain information that students can read first and then use to create their response. The graphic organiser for engaging with the legislation has been modified. (I have provided them with the definition for the first two crimes and they have to explain whether it is a good law and how it impacts people living in Queensland. For the remaining 2 they also have to do the definition.)
Feminist Movements - 11 Modern History - Impacts of 2nd wave feminism
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Feminist Movements - 11 Modern History - Impacts of 2nd wave feminism

(0)
A PowerPoint used in a year 11 Modern History classroom. It begins with a viewing activity ‘A bite sized guide to the history of modern Western feminism.’ Following this there are slides talking about how gender stereotypes began to shift due to the work of the Women’s Liberation Movement. I get students to copy the underlined text and call on various students to read aloud other portions. Students are introduced to ‘consciousness raising’ a method used by 2nd wave feminists. Following this there is a quote from Zelda D’Aprano (a feminist from Melbourne) about the inspiration for using consciousness raising and what types of things they discussed. An extract from the Rivka Pile papers (University of Melbourne) is also included to demonstrate the significance of this strategy. Following this students are introduced to some gender theory including that gender is a social construct and the term ‘gender role’ is defined. This is followed by an exploration of visual sources (pictures from a children’s book from 1970) which reinforced traditional gender role stereotypes. This is followed by a list of issues that were being addressed by feminists by the 1970s including domestic violence, abortion law reform and availiability of childcare services (including day care and preschool). The introduction of women into Australian politics is discussed with reference to The Women’s Electoral Lobby and the ‘femocrats’ appointed to public service during Gough Whitlam’s time as PM. This is followed by information about the significant achievements which took place in the 1980s. The remaining few slides are about viewpoints about 2nd wave feminism. The lesson ends with a paragraph writing task which can be completed for homework if time gets away from you. Resources designed for the new senior Modern History syllabus (implemented in QLD in 2019). Designed as part of a unit entitled Women’s movements since 1893 which has the scope to span from when Women’s suffrage in New Zealand became law to the present. Our school decided to focus on the Second Wave of Feminism for our assessment (while briefly touching on the other waves of feminism).The other resources are also available in my store - Aussie_Resources. The end of term assessment for this unit was an essay under exam conditions.
Causes of World War Two
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Causes of World War Two

(3)
A free PowerPoint which I think History teachers will find helpful. If you use it, and like it, please come and give me a positive star rating / review :). Constructive criticism is also appreciated. PowerPoint 1: Causes of World War Two • term overview (what we are learning + how we will be assessed) • key questions for unit (from ACARA) • context (what happened after WW1 that set the stage for WW2) • statistics (number of casualties in WW2) • information about the following: o the treaty of Versailles o Hitler’s rise to power: worldwide economic depression + the effects of the depression on Germany + the fall of Germany’s democratic government o Anti-communism o The basic ideas of the Nazi ideology + The source of Hitler’s power o Other major causes of WW2: Japanese expansionism, appeasement, militarism, the rise of fascism in Italy, nationalism, American isolationism, o Maps: Theatres of War: Where WWII Was Fought o two homework tasks (developing a glossary of terms + reading from a textbook and answering questions)
Social and Community Studies – Legally, it could be you!  –  Viewing lesson (RBT) Road laws
Aussie_resourcesAussie_resources

Social and Community Studies – Legally, it could be you! – Viewing lesson (RBT) Road laws

(0)
A PowerPoint to support a viewing lesson. Students are to watch an episode of RBT (available on ClickView or for streaming via 10 Play). This is designed to get students familiar with some of the traffic crimes and how to describe them in written form (paragraphs). We did a couple of these viewing lessons and worksheets are also available in my store. Part of a set of resources created for a senior Social & Community studies class in Australia (QCAA syllabus). The other resources are also available in my store – Aussie_Resources. Designed for use in 70 minute lessons. The end of term assessment for this unit was a multimodal presentation.