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An independent charity that leverages the journalistic expertise of The Economist newspaper. We enable inspiring discussions about the news in, and between, schools. Discussions that invite young people to be curious about the world’s biggest ideas and challenges, and consider what should be done about them.

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An independent charity that leverages the journalistic expertise of The Economist newspaper. We enable inspiring discussions about the news in, and between, schools. Discussions that invite young people to be curious about the world’s biggest ideas and challenges, and consider what should be done about them.
Fake News and Democracy
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Fake News and Democracy

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CHECK OUT OUR MORE RECENT DEMOCRACY AND BREXIT RESOURCE HERE: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/brexit-and-democracy-debate-should-the-uk-have-a-second-referendum-12068930 Everyone is talking about 'fake news’ at the moment, after it became such a big thing during the American election. People accuse it of changing the election results and of deceiving the public. This 6-session scheme of work explores fake news, and teaches students how to spot fake news and challenge what they hear in the media. These fully-planned, interactive and multi-media resources help to develop your student’s critical thinking and literacy skills and to embed cognitively challenging conversations in your classrooms. If you’d like to find out more, visit burnetnewsclub.com
Black Lives Matter: racism, equality, equity & fairness
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Black Lives Matter: racism, equality, equity & fairness

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Published in response to recent events, these resources helps learners to explore questions like: What is prejudice? What does discrimination look like? Whose responsibility is it to end racism? Is racism always obvious? Is treating people equally always fair? Is racism getting worse? This resource includes Advice on managing sensitive conversations with young people. Links to further anti-racism resources for both children and adults. A special piece for older students with thinking questions.
Home learning: coronavirus and wellbeing
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Home learning: coronavirus and wellbeing

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Coronavirus and wellbeing. Help children reflect on their wellbeing in the current climate and consider how they could help themselves and others. This resource encourages learners to think about how others are coping during the pandemic and the factors that can affect this. Get learners to explore questions like: What kind of things help your wellbeing? How has the coronavirus impacted your mental health? How could you help someone else stay positive during this time? Learners can also find links to further support on mental health.
Brexit and the EU referendum
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Brexit and the EU referendum

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CHECK OUT OUR MORE RECENT BREXIT RESOURCE HERE: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/brexit-and-democracy-debate-should-the-uk-have-a-second-referendum-12068930 This unit of work covers understanding and analysis of this important and topical issue. Students are asked to evaluate the facts and give their opinion through a range of activities. This issue asks students to create poems to reflect their opinions. This resource is an issue that students cover in the Burnet News Club (www.burnetnewsclub.com) ----------- INTRODUCTION TO THE ISSUE The European Union (the EU for short) is a club with 28 member countries from Europe. Its purpose is mainly to make it easier for member countries to trade (buy and sell things) with each other. There are laws and rules that member countries have to follow. On June 23rd Britain will hold a referendum in which voters will choose whether to stay in or to leave the EU. The outcome will have a big effect on our economy, on politics and on Europe.
Home learning | Child-led activity: the coronavirus
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Home learning | Child-led activity: the coronavirus

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This student-led learning activity helps young people to investigate the coronavirus pandemic and explores really interesting questions like: How do we know what information to trust? Why do people do things that they know are wrong? Whose views do we need to see the whole picture? Young people can give this a go on their own, but if there’s someone at home to work with, why not have a go together? You could also connect with someone by telephone or video. We’ll practise some critical-thinking skills which are important for understanding and discussing the news: reasoning, open-mindedness, scepticism and speaking-up.
Home-learning: numeracy in the news
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Home-learning: numeracy in the news

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Numeracy in the news: behind the headlines Designed to be used at home by a child working alone or with an adult or siblings. These activities help learners make sense of the numbers in the news and empower them to make their own judgments based on evidence.  Through a combination of numeracy skills and discussion questions, learners are able to see behind the headlines and better-understand the media they consume. Engaging scenarios help them to: Investigate how numbers can be presented to support a viewpoint Interrogate the accuracy of claims in the headlines Adjust their thinking in light of new findings Analyse numerical evidence to help solve a social issue A classroom version of this resource is also available to download here.
What is 'the news'?
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What is 'the news'?

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This resource introduces students to the news and gets them answering key questions about where the news can be found and how the importance of a news story will differ from person to person. It could be used as part of PSHE, before looking at a particular story, to give students a better understanding of a news-report task. This lesson helps to develop the following news literacy skills: SCEPTICISM: Questioning information to find the truth REASONING: Justifying a viewpoint This resource was produced by The Economist Educational Foundation, an independent charity that was set up by The Economist magazine. Combining The Economist’s journalistic know-how with teaching expertise, we specialise in supporting teachers to facilitate high-quality classroom discussions about the news.
Home learning: draw your own news cartoon
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Home learning: draw your own news cartoon

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The Economist’s cartoonist, Kal, guides you through his creative process explaining how he takes on the role of journalist, satirist, commentator and artist before challenging young people at home to get drawing. These activities encourage learners to: Explore the aims of cartoons Understand the different audiences of political cartoons Discover the importance of “four hats” to the design process Plan and draw their own political cartoons Cartoons are also a great discussion starter, generating questions about purpose, meaning and interpretation - perfect to use alongside a written text. A classroom version of this resource is also available to download.
Political Cartoons
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Political Cartoons

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This resource looks at the purpose of political cartoons and how an expert produces them. It will take 60 minutes to run and is aimed at 10- to 15-year-olds. We suggest running it with 12 to 30 students. Teachers are encouraged to adapt it as necessary for their students’ needs. – This lesson helps to develop the following news literacy skills: SPEAKING UP: Confidently communicating a viewpoint SCEPTICISM: Questioning information to find the truth – This resource was produced by The Economist Educational Foundation, an independent charity that was set up by The Economist magazine. We combine The Economist’s journalistic know-how with teaching expertise, and we specialise in supporting teachers to facilitate high-quality classroom discussions about the news.
News Cycle | President Trump and Covid
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News Cycle | President Trump and Covid

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Download activities that assess the information around President Trump’s positive test for covid-19. How did the information emerge and who from? What do people think about how Mr Trump handled his own diagnosis? Help learners reach their own verdict. This resource helps your learners to: Discuss recent events with contextual knowledge Identify the consequences of false information Assess different views before forming their own opinion
Home learning: Freedom of speech
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Home learning: Freedom of speech

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This unprecedented COVID-19 crisis has brought debates around freedom of speech into the spotlight. This resource provokes thinking about what people should be allowed to say, and who should make the rules. These activities challenge learners to think about questions like: Should people be allowed to say whatever they want? Is censorship necessary during a pandemic? What’s more important - freedom to say what you want, or safety from harmful words? Learners can complete the activities on their own but it’s even better if an adult can push them to develop their reasons and see other perspectives. The reflection questions can provoke extended discussions. For example, when (if ever) is it acceptable for a leader to withhold information?
Designing the sustainable city of tomorrow
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Designing the sustainable city of tomorrow

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A POSITIVE HUMAN FUTURE: Designing the sustainable city of tomorrow Length: 4x sessions, 4 hours total, but you can pick out activities that interest you the most! Age: 9+. Older students should spend more time on sessions 2 and 3 Group size: This workshop would work best for 10-25 students This workshop was sponsored by PA Consulting, an innovation and transformation consultancy. The workshop is designed to support PA’s Raspberry Pi competition 2020, an annual contest which challenges school and college students nationwide to put their innovation and programming skills to the test. It can be used by schools taking part in the competition as a way to generate ideas for competition entries. However, this resource can also be used by schools that are not taking part in the competition. We hope lots of schools will enjoy using it to facilitate inspiring discussions in their classrooms about the future of cities! It’s a great subject to stimulate creative thinking and debate about real world issues, from social mobility to healthcare. In this workshop, students will: Build knowledge around the history of cities Explore and debate the opportunities and challenges of modern city living Unpick the data informing us about cities Research and evaluate case studies of technological innovation in cities Generate ideas of their own for future cities This resource helps to develop the following skills: SCEPTICISM: Questioning information to find the truth REASONING: Justifying a viewpoint SPEAKING UP: Confidently communicating a viewpoint OPEN-MINDEDNESS: Listening to other viewpoints These resources were produced by The Economist Educational Foundation, an independent charity that was set up by The Economist magazine. Combining the Economist’s journalistic know-how with teaching expertise, we specialise in supporting teachers to facilitate high-quality classroom discussions about the news.
Home learning: the coronavirus and gender
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Home learning: the coronavirus and gender

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Is the coronavirus affecting men and women differently? This resource encourages learners to study this question from several angles: from death rates, to the impact of lockdown to numbers on the front line. The activities help learners use evidence to draw their own conclusions and to assess the limits of the available data. Weigh up the evidence on questions like: Is COVID-19 worsening gender inequality? Are women better leaders during a crisis? Does we think hard enough about gender during a pandemic? The reflection activity invites learners to write 100 words about why it’s important to think about gender equality during the current crisis.
Rights in the modern world: privacy, freedom and safety
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Rights in the modern world: privacy, freedom and safety

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This unit of work covers understanding and analysis of this important and topical issue. Students are asked to evaluate the facts and give their opinion through a range of activities. This resource is an issue that students cover in the Burnet News Club (www.burnetnewsclub.com) ----------- INTRODUCTION TO THE ISSUE The UK is considering a new draft Investigatory Powers Bill. This is a really important law, because it would affect your rights. Your rights are the things that you are entitled to do or to have. This issue asks students to discuss and evaluate the implications of the Bill on our rights. It offers a great opportunity to explore British values as required in UK schools.
Earth Day - Speaking and Listening activities to engage with the big questions around climate action
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Earth Day - Speaking and Listening activities to engage with the big questions around climate action

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April 22nd is Earth Day, and this resource engages students with big questions about climate action. They’re challenged to consider the specific steps they can take over different timescales, to discuss the obstacles and to question where responsibilities lie. This resource will be used by schools worldwide as part of the Global Conversation from April 20th - June 1st 2020. Follow the discussion at BurnetNewsClub.com
Home learning: extreme weather student project
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Home learning: extreme weather student project

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Extreme weather is one of the biggest threats facing our world. To minimise the impact, communities, economies and health care systems need to respond and adapt. But how? This six-lesson scheme of work explores the answer to this question and many more. These activities encourage learners to: Investigate how extreme weather affects different communities Consider links to climate change Evaluate different responses that the world can make Reflect on the responsibilities countries have to each other There are opportunities to make connections with the COVID-19 pandemic and draw parallels between different crises. This scheme of work is student-led, which means it is perfect for use at home independently, with a sibling or with parental input.
Climate Change
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Climate Change

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This resource introduces students to the climate emergency and gets them discussing a range of big questions. It’s suitable for students aged 10 and over. This lesson helps to develop the following news literacy skills: SPEAKING UP: Confidently communicating a viewpoint OPEN-MINDEDNESS: Listening to other viewpoints This resource was produced by The Economist Educational Foundation, an independent charity that was set up by The Economist magazine. We combine The Economist’s journalistic know-how with teaching expertise, and we specialise in supporting teachers to facilitate high-quality classroom discussions about the news.
Home learning: crisis and conspiracies
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Home learning: crisis and conspiracies

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Help learners separate fact from fiction by understanding how conspiracy theories start and spread. This resource gets learners thinking about questions such as: What is a conspiracy theory? How do conspiracy theories spread? Who is responsible for stopping their spread? The activities look at fake stories about the coronavirus and investigate the dangers of letting conspiracy theories go unchallenged. Learners can also explore deeper questions about free speech, censorship and the role of social media.
Seeking the truth in the war photography of Roger Fenton
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Seeking the truth in the war photography of Roger Fenton

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A 75 minute workshop exploring Roger Fenton, one of the earliest war photographers. Students will build a picture of Britain during the Crimean War; consider the impact of photography on the British public; and debate whether Fenton offered one of the earliest examples of fake news. This workshop: – Covers the context behind the Crimean War – Uncovers the impact of war photography on the British public – Evaluates several of Fenton’s photographs – Supports students to interrogate if war photography always tells the truth Everything is provided, from session guides to resource activities, to run the 75 minute workshop for students aged 11-15.
Home learning: is a vegan society a better society?
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Home learning: is a vegan society a better society?

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This child-led learning resource is perfect for use at home independently, with a sibling or with adult input. The activities helps learners to think about what veganism means for society and lets them explore really interesting questions like: • Why do people choose to be vegan? • What factors are important when people make lifestyle choices? • Is a vegan society a better society? It will help learners to practise the critical-thinking skills which are important for understanding and discussing the news: reasoning, open-mindedness and scepticism, as well as the communication skill, speaking-up.