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history Teacher by Day and By Night Shop

I have been teaching for 13 years. I have taught in New York, Connecticut, California, and Colorado teaching US History, Modern World History, Ancient World History, Social Problems, World Religions, Geography, Economics and more. I believe teaching is an art and find joy in creating hands-on activities that engage my students. My expectations are high for my students and myself.

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I have been teaching for 13 years. I have taught in New York, Connecticut, California, and Colorado teaching US History, Modern World History, Ancient World History, Social Problems, World Religions, Geography, Economics and more. I believe teaching is an art and find joy in creating hands-on activities that engage my students. My expectations are high for my students and myself.
1970s and 1980s: JIMMY CARTER’S FOREIGN POLICY Lesson Plan

1970s and 1980s: JIMMY CARTER’S FOREIGN POLICY Lesson Plan

JIMMY CARTER’S FOREIGN POLICY DIRECTIONS: READ THE INFORMATION GIVEN ON CARTER AND DECIDE WHETHER OR NOT HIS FOREIGN POLICY WAS BEST FOR AMERICA? CARTER CHANGES COURSE Early in his presidency, Jimmy Carter proclaimed that as much as possible, American foreign policy would be guided by a concern for human rights. Carter hoped to make his foreign policy into a tool to end acts of political repression such as torture, murder, and imprisonment without trial. This policy direction helped reaffirm the position of the United States as a nation of freedom and justice. However, it undercut the goal of better relations with the Soviet Union.
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Ancient Greek Sports Worksheet

Ancient Greek Sports Worksheet

Ancient Greek Sports Festivals and Sports The ancient Greeks believed that strong healthy citizens helped strengthen the city-state. They often included sporting events in the festivals they held to honor their gods. The most famous sports festival was the Olympic games, held every four years. Records of Olympics winners started in 776 B.C. At first, the festival lasted only one day and had only one contest, a race called the stade. Later, many other events were added, including a long-distance race, wrestling, the long jump, the javelin, and the discus throw. The Olympics was expanded to five days in 472 B.C. Women’s Sports Women had their own sports festival in ancient Greece. It was the festival devoted to Hera, the wife of Zeus. Like the Olympics, the Hera festival was held every four years. One of the main events was a foot race for unmarried women. Discus Thrower Ancient athletes, such as this discus thrower, would be considered amateurs today because they received no pay for competing. However, they trained rigorously for months at a time. Victors were given lavish gifts and were hailed as heroes. Many athletes competed full-time Mount Olympus The ancient Olympics honored Zeus, the father of all Greek gods and goddesses. According to legend, Zeus hurled a thunderbolt from Mount Olympus at a spot in rural Greece. An altar for Zeus was built on that spot. Eventually, many buildings were erected around the altar. This area was called Olympia and became the site for the Olympic games. Questions: 1. Evaluating Decisions Do you think it was a good decision for the Greeks to add more sporting events to the Olympics? Explain. 2. Comparing and Contrasting How are today’s Olympics similar to and different from the Olympics in ancient Greece? Stearns, Peter N., Donald R. Schwartz, and Barry K. Beyer. World History: Traditions and New Directions. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley, 1991. Print.
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Conspiracy Theories Assignment/ Project- Students love this!

Conspiracy Theories Assignment/ Project- Students love this!

Conspiracy Theories Assignment/ Project- Students love this! this includes, background information, research tasks and topics with graphic organizer for students to complete with an annotated bibliography and rubric Background: One guilty pleasure in the life of a curious person is indulgence in the world of conspiracy theories. Conspiracy theories serve an important purpose for one major reason: they contain plenty of truth or of verifiable fact in resistance to secret, corporate or government entities that are not forthcoming with the truth about strange, criminal, covert or extra normal events. Conspiracy theories help humans to imagine the worst. Imagining the worst helps to prepare the human mind and society for the worst. Preparing for the worst is essential to survival. Your Task: To Research One Great Conspiracy in the world, and come up with your own conclusion to help shed “new” light and truth to the conspiracy, or to prove the “conspiracy” to be false.
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World War II: The War in the Pacific: Map Activity with Key!

World War II: The War in the Pacific: Map Activity with Key!

The War in the Pacific: Map Activity Background: Japan took over large chunks of eastern Asia in the late 1930s. In 1941, Japan attacked the US naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Then, Japanese forces quickly took over American, British, Dutch, and other territories in Asia and the Western Pacific. Starting in mid-1912, Allied (mostly US) forces began fighting their way back across and up the Pacific towards Japan. Directions: Locate and label the Islands and countries listed below Then, Locate and Label, as well as date the battles, invasions, and other military actions listed below Next, trace the movements of Allied forces toward Japan. They moved west across the Pacific from Pearl Harbor. They also moved northwest up the Pacific from Eastern Australia. Countries and Islands Hawaiian Islands Malaya Australia Midway Islands Singapore New Guinea Gilbert Islands French Indochina Aleutian Islands Marshall Islands Thailand Philippine Islands Marian Islands Burma Formosa Solomon Islands China Japan Mongolia Korea Dutch East Indies (including Borneo, Celebes, Sumatra) Soviet Union Manchuria Military Actions: Midway Tarawa Coral Seas Guam Tinian Guadalcanal Leyte Gulf Iwo Jima Okinawa Pearl Harbor Wake Kiska Landing, Attu Eniwetok Philippine Sea Palau Islands Brunei Hiroshima Nagasaki
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DBQ: Watergate What were roles of the Congress, the press, & the courts in investigating President?

DBQ: Watergate What were roles of the Congress, the press, & the courts in investigating President?

What were the roles of the Congress, the press, and the courts in investigating President Nixon’s unchecked presidential power? Background: President Richard Nixon’s administration was marred by political scandal, called Watergate. That led to his resignation. What were the roles of the Congress, the press, and the courts in investigating President Nixon’s unchecked presidential power? Task: Use your knowledge of World War II and the documents to answer the questions and then the essential question
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1980s United States Dinner Party Assignment/ Lesson Plan/ Assessment

1980s United States Dinner Party Assignment/ Lesson Plan/ Assessment

You are hosting a dinner party and are inviting 12 historical figures from our unit this school year. Some of your guests may not get along, they are from different cultures, and some may not eat what you have planned. It is your job to create a successful dinner party using the criteria below. PART 1: CHOOSE YOUR GUESTS You must have people from the following time periods. You can only be general about one person from each column, otherwise they all have to be specific individuals. (Example of general would be : War Hawk “someone doesn’t like war” during Vietnam era. Be sure to give a BRIEF Description of who they are Step 2: SEAT YOUR GUESTS. Draw a table and explain you seating choice. (You might not want someone people to sit next to one another b/c they might fight, or you might want them to sit next to someone else b/c they might fight; you might want to group people with common interests…you decide and tell why thoroughly Thorough explanation of seating: Step 3: Topic of Conversation A good host NEVER lets his/her guests sit in silence and knows their guests well. For each person come up with a topic of conversation or a question for them to answer. Step 4: Food What will you serve your guests? Think of their needs and or what they are associated with (example is someone fought in Germany, serve them German food; Gandhi cannot eat meat, so you might want to order him lettuce) Step 5: Entertainment You might want to provide a song that represents your guests. (Example: Rosa Parks is known for not sitting on the back of the bus- therefore she might really enjoy OutKasts “Rosa parks song where the line quotes “everybody move the back of the bus…” , Whereas Agent Deep Throat (from the Nixon hearings, the informant that refused to give up his name might use the Ting Ting’s “That’s not my name” because he refused to reveal his identity) Be sure to give reasons as to why they get that song Step 6: Party Favors Dinner guests love party favors. What will you give each of your guests as they leave your dinner party? Tell Why (example Martin Luther King Jr. might get a dream catcher b/c of his I have a dream speech)
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Rome: THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY- Lesson Plan

Rome: THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY- Lesson Plan

THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY OBJECTIVES: Describe how the conditions Jews faced in Judaea contributed to the rose of Christianity, Identify the difficulties early Christians experienced in the Roman Empire, and Explain the changes that helped establish Christianity and stabilize the church during the late Roman Empire MAIN GOAL: To understand that the rise of Christianity and its gradual spread across the empire changed the culture of the Romans Time: 1 Class Period (57 mins) LESSON PLAN IN DETAIL: 1. Bell Ringer: I will put a map of the spread of the Roman Empire on an overhead and ask my students to write down what they know about Roman Religion and the Religion of groups in the areas Rome controlled (5 mins) 2. As a class, we will read the textbook chapter entitled “The Rise of Christianity”. Students will “bump” read. (20 mins, Total 25 mins) 3. Students will then break into assigned groups and complete the worksheet that goes along with this reading (15 mins, Total 40 mins) 4. We will then go over the worksheet (10 mins, Total 50 mins) 5. Closure: Students will take a short quiz based on what they learned today. ( 7 mins, Total 57 mins) Homework – DBQ Packet on Rise of Christianity and questions to go with it.
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What is an Empire?, How is an empire formed?, Do people benefit from an empire?  Lesson Plan

What is an Empire?, How is an empire formed?, Do people benefit from an empire? Lesson Plan

What is an Empire?, How is an empire formed?, Do people benefit from an empire? Lesson Plan OBJECTIVES: Students will define and explain what an empire is MAIN GOAL: To understand what an Empire is LESSON PLAN IN DETAIL: 1. Bell Ringer Questions: What is an Empire?, How is an empire formed?, Do you think people benefit from an empire? Explain, Can you name one Empire in history?, Are empires likely to remain a crucial part of the human landscape for the foreseeable future? o Students will fill out the bell ringer activity of the sheet of paper handed out by the instructor. o I will ask several students to volunteer their answer (10mins.) 2. I will then tell students that “Bitter Political Power struggles within the Roman Republic led to the creation of the Roman Empire. Today we will read “Introduction: What is an Empire?” (1 min., Total 11 mins.) 3. I will then instruct students that they will be working in one of their assigned groups and reading the article. In their groups they are to read the article page by page, and target the key ideas on each page. The number of key ideas and bulleted information is to be written down on the paper handed out by instructor. (30 mins., Total 41 mins) 4. We will then discuss what each group bulleted. (15 mins. 56 mins)
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World War II: The War in the Pacific: Map Activity

World War II: The War in the Pacific: Map Activity

World War II: The War in the Pacific: Map Activity Background: Japan took over large chunks of eastern Asia in the late 1930s. In 1941, Japan attacked the US naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Then, Japanese forces quickly took over American, British, Dutch, and other territories in Asia and the Western Pacific. Starting in mid-1912, Allied (mostly US) forces began fighting their way back across and up the Pacific towards Japan. Directions: Locate and label the Islands and countries listed below Then, Locate and Label, as well as date the battles, invasions, and other military actions listed below Next, trace the movements of Allied forces toward Japan. They moved west across the Pacific from Pearl Harbor. They also moved northwest up the Pacific from Eastern Australia. Countries and Islands Hawaiian Islands Malaya Australia Midway Islands Singapore New Guinea Gilbert Islands French Indochina Aleutian Islands Marshall Islands Thailand Philippine Islands Marian Islands Burma Formosa Solomon Islands China Japan Mongolia Korea Dutch East Indies (including Borneo, Celebes, Sumatra) Soviet Union Manchuria Military Actions: Midway Tarawa Coral Seas Guam Tinian Guadalcanal Leyte Gulf Iwo Jima Okinawa Pearl Harbor Wake Kiska Landing, Attu Eniwetok Philippine Sea Palau Islands Brunei Hiroshima Nagasaki
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Analyzing Primary Sources:  Hammurabi’s Code of Laws Worksheet

Analyzing Primary Sources: Hammurabi’s Code of Laws Worksheet

Analyzing Primary Sources: Hammurabi’s Code of Laws Background: The image above shows the tops of a pillar that had Hammurabi’s Code engraved on it. Hammurabi’s Law code prescribed punishments ranging from fines to death. Often the punishments were based on the social class of the victim. Below are some examples of the laws: Questions: 1. Why might the punishments for the crimes be based on social class? What does this tell you about society? 2. What do you think the value was in making the punishments for the crimes known to all? 3. Compare the Laws of Hammurabi with that of the laws in the United States today. How are the punishments similar and/or different?
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