World War I- Major Battles Webquest

World War I- Major Battles Webquest

World War I- Major Battles Webquest asks students various questions about major Battles during World War I- asking students to pay particular attention to who fought vs. whom, where, important facts/ events, outcome, number of deaths/ destruction, and more- and to map the battles the Battles are: Marne Verdun Somme Passchendaele/ Ypres Christmas Truce Battle of Tannenberg Gallipoli Jutland St. Mihiel Chatteau Thierry Overall number of deaths and outcomes and theories
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Race Riots/ Urban Riots in the United States- Document Based Question

Race Riots/ Urban Riots in the United States- Document Based Question

Race Riots/ Urban Riots in the United States Essential Question: To what degree is change dependent on Conflict? And Can Conflict be Prevented? Background: Riots are shocking events where the ordinary rules of society break down. London 2011 was gripped by the sight of burning cars and hooded youths looting shops. But why do riots happen? What reason could there be for such destruction? Is it poverty and unemployment? Are people alienated from society? Or was it simple opportunism by criminals? Are they provoked by police brutality? Or did the police do too little to stop them? Are they the sign of a breakdown in morality? Are they a product of a “culture of dependency”? Or do some people just want to see the world burn? The United States has its own history of civil unrest; and much of our history involves poverty, race, in cities. Therefore, it is worthwhile to look at some of the dynamics and causes of the major urban race riots that have occurred in the United States. Many Riots from the late 20th century till today, stand out as particularly dramatic moments in American urban history, and it is useful to tease out some of the historical contingencies and large social conditions that produced these periods of strife in order to prevent more violence from occurring. - Source: Nielsen, Author Robert. “What Causes Riots?” Whistling In The Wind, 1 Mar. 2013, whistlinginthewind.org/2013/02/28/what-causes-riots/. Task/ World Class Outcome: Investigate the past events (riots) and generate an understanding of current events to purpose solutions to achieve future objectives In other words, you will research and read about riots in the United States using the information provided and create an action plan/ advice for the President of the United States to solve the Race Problems within the Urban areas of the United States and prevent future riots. In doing so use, the graphic organizer to help you find out more information about the Riots researched. Riots Include 1898 Wilmington 1906 Atlanta 1917 St. Louis 1919 Red Summer Chicago 1921 Tulsa, OK 1943 Detriot 1964 Harlem, NY 1964 LA, Watts 1967 Newark, NJ 1968 Baltimore 1991 Crown Heights, NY 1992 LA- Rodney King 2014 Ferguson, Missouri 2015- Baltimore
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Advanced Technology during Ancient Civilizations: Phoenician Sailing, Bronze from Shang China DBQ

Advanced Technology during Ancient Civilizations: Phoenician Sailing, Bronze from Shang China DBQ

Advanced Technology during Ancient Civilizations: Phoenician Sailing, Bronze from Shang China Background: New technologies gave the ancient civilizations new ways of solving problems. Some solved age-old problems—for example, the plow made it easier to till the soil. Some solved new problems. Egyptians learned how to embalm the bodies of dead rulers as part of their complex beliefs about life after death. Document A: Phoenician Sailing The Phoenicians traded throughout the Mediterranean Sea and beyond. They were the most skilled sailors of their time. The first ships relied on rowers and did not have sails. They also lacked rudders for steering. By about 700 B.C., though, the Phoenicians had made advances. They added long steering oars in the back and a single sail, which could catch the wind and move the ship forward. Captains came to rely on the sails, though rowers had to work when the weather was calm or when the wind was not blowing from behind the ship. QUESTION a. What is the advantage of having a sail on the ship? Document B: Bronze from Shang China During the Shang Dynasty, Chinese artisans grew highly skilled at making bronze. Bronze is a mixture of copper and tin. They made bronze weapons and vessels for religious ceremonies. Bronzes were made by creating pottery molds that were carved on the inside, in reverse, to leave the desired pattern on the final object. Hot liquid bronze was poured inside. When it had cooled, the pottery molds were broken. QUESTION a. What does the intricate detail of this piece suggest about Shang society? Overall Questions: 1. How do the ancient systems of writing differ from the way words are written today? 2. What role did trade play in the development of writing? 3. Which technological advances do you think were more important—Chinese skill in making bronzes or Phoenician skill in sailing? Why? 4. Technological changes have continued throughout history. Choose one area of life, such as land transportation, communication, medicine, or raising food. Using this textbook or an encyclopedia, find out what technology one of these ancient civilizations had in that area. Then identify technological changes in that area over the centuries. Create an illustrated time line to show how that technology has changed.
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Ancient African Iron working worksheet

Ancient African Iron working worksheet

African Ironworking Refining metal was an important technological advance in every civilization. Africa was no exception. Iron tools were stronger than copper or bronze tools, so iron tools and the technology to produce them were very valuable. Producing iron began by mining the iron ore. The iron itself was bound up with other minerals in rocks. The trick was separating the iron from the unwanted minerals. That was the function of the furnace shown below. This process is known as smelting. 1. Layers of iron ore were alternated with layers of charcoal fuel inside the furnace. Temperatures inside the furnace would reach about 2000º F. 2. A tuyère (twee•YAIR) was a clay pipe that allowed air to flow through the furnace. 3. The bellows—usually made out of an animal skin with a wooden plunger attached— increased air flow in the furnace, thus raising the temperature. 4. The intense heat would cause a chemical reaction, separating the iron from the impurities. 5. The iron would collect and form what is called a bloom. After cooling, the bloom was removed. An ironsmith then worked the bloom into the desired too l or weapon. Questions: 1. What advantages would iron tools give a civilization? 2. Comparing and Contrasting Use the Internet to research the history of modern ironworking techniques. What improvements have been made, and how do they benefit our life today?
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Ancient Greek Sports Worksheet

Ancient Greek Sports Worksheet

Ancient Greek Sports Festivals and Sports The ancient Greeks believed that strong healthy citizens helped strengthen the city-state. They often included sporting events in the festivals they held to honor their gods. The most famous sports festival was the Olympic games, held every four years. Records of Olympics winners started in 776 B.C. At first, the festival lasted only one day and had only one contest, a race called the stade. Later, many other events were added, including a long-distance race, wrestling, the long jump, the javelin, and the discus throw. The Olympics was expanded to five days in 472 B.C. Women’s Sports Women had their own sports festival in ancient Greece. It was the festival devoted to Hera, the wife of Zeus. Like the Olympics, the Hera festival was held every four years. One of the main events was a foot race for unmarried women. Discus Thrower Ancient athletes, such as this discus thrower, would be considered amateurs today because they received no pay for competing. However, they trained rigorously for months at a time. Victors were given lavish gifts and were hailed as heroes. Many athletes competed full-time Mount Olympus The ancient Olympics honored Zeus, the father of all Greek gods and goddesses. According to legend, Zeus hurled a thunderbolt from Mount Olympus at a spot in rural Greece. An altar for Zeus was built on that spot. Eventually, many buildings were erected around the altar. This area was called Olympia and became the site for the Olympic games. Questions: 1. Evaluating Decisions Do you think it was a good decision for the Greeks to add more sporting events to the Olympics? Explain. 2. Comparing and Contrasting How are today’s Olympics similar to and different from the Olympics in ancient Greece? Stearns, Peter N., Donald R. Schwartz, and Barry K. Beyer. World History: Traditions and New Directions. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley, 1991. Print.
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Byzantine Empire: Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy worksheet

Byzantine Empire: Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy worksheet

Byzantine Empire: Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy Background: Originally, Christianity had one church. Because of political conflicts and differences in belief, the western and eastern parts of the Christian Church split apart in 1054. The western church became the Roman Catholic Church, and the eastern church became the Eastern Orthodox Church. Both churches believe in the gospel of Jesus and in the Bible as interpreted by their church. They also believe that God uses sacraments to convey his love to humans. Sacraments are visible signs of something sacred; for instance, the water used in baptism is a sign of God’s power to cleanse people of sin. The Venn diagram below shows other similarities and differences. ROMAN CATHOLIC AND EASTERN ORTHODOX DATA • U.S. state with highest percentage of Roman Catholics: Rhode Island, 51 percent. 2001 American Religious Identification Survey by Graduate Center of City University of New York • U.S. states with highest percentage of Eastern Orthodox: New Hampshire and New Jersey, 0.90 percent each. 1990 National Survey of Religious Identification • Vatican City is an independent state located in Rome, Italy. The Roman Catholic Church claims more than a billion members worldwide. Concise Columbia Encyclopedia, third edition; www.adherents.com • The largest of the Eastern Orthodox churches is the Russian Orthodox Church. It claims 90 million members worldwide. www.adherents.com • In 2003, the world region with the largest population of Roman Catholics: Latin America, 473,000,000 • In 2003, the world region with the largest population of Eastern Orthodox members: Europe, 158,450,000 – - Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year 2004 The 11th Century: Comparing Two Churches Roman Catholic Both Eastern Orthodox Services are conducted in Latin. The pope has authority over all other bishops. The pope claims authority over all kings and emperors. Priests may not marry. Divorce is not permitted. They base their faith on the gospel of Jesus and the Bible. They use sacraments such as baptism. Their religious leaders are priests and bishops. They seek to convert people. Services are conducted in Greek or local languages. The patriarch and other bishops head the Church as a group. The emperor claims authority over the patriarch and other bishops of the empire.
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Cause of Revolutions: England, North American, France, & Latin America - Chart

Cause of Revolutions: England, North American, France, & Latin America - Chart

Cause of Revolutions: England, North American, France, & Latin America Each of the revolutions you studied in this unit had political, economic, and social causes, as shown in the chart below. Some of the causes mentioned on the chart are the subjects of the primary sources located on the next page. Use the chart and the primary sources together to understand the causes of revolution more fully.
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