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Ms Hughes Teaches

I've been a history teacher for 15 years now so have a mass of resources I've made. I hope you find them useful!

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I've been a history teacher for 15 years now so have a mass of resources I've made. I hope you find them useful!
How to answer History DBQ (GCSE) source based questions REVISION CARDS

How to answer History DBQ (GCSE) source based questions REVISION CARDS

In a bid to help our students think more like historians we set them various styles of question based on the sources in DBQs. These helpful little cards can be used with any document or piece of evidence in history. They work for any time period and help our students to address real issues of provenance and purpose. I devised these initially to support the English GCSE OCR History syllabus followed in my school and to help prepare my students for any question that might come up in their end of year exam. However, they would be helpful to any student getting to grips with analysing sources and also how to write to write good answers with an analytical focus. Excellent as revision aids. You can print out the 8, two-sided cards. Fold them over length ways and the correct backing is with the correct frontispiece. One side explains how to address a particular type of question and the other gives examples of sentence starters or good answers. Questions include: - Why was this source published? - What is the main message of this source? - Do you trust this source over another? - How far do you agree with the statement…? - Does the source prove that…? - How useful is this source to an historian?- How similar are these sources? - What could an historian learn from this source about…? I had mine printed on yellow card and laminated for every student in my exam classes. They have proven invaluable to them as they practiced exam style questions in test prep and revision. I hope you and your students find them as useful.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Tolland Man Murder Mystery - interpreting evidence using inference

Tolland Man Murder Mystery - interpreting evidence using inference

This lesson is an introduction to the mystery of the Tolland Peat Bog Man and what happened to him. This lesson is designed to get younger KS3 pupils questioning evidence. They have to make a decision as to whether he was murdered, committed suicide or it was an accident. Pupils should work in pairs and the teacher drip feeds the information gradually to encourage pupils to form opinions and have them challenged. They then can present their decision to the rest of the class using the evidence. Contains three worksheets, full lesson plans and a fully animated Powerpoint presentation like a news report.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Who was Jack the Ripper? History Mystery Suspect Tournament

Who was Jack the Ripper? History Mystery Suspect Tournament

Can your students decide who Jack the Ripper was out of a cast of 12 suspects? In this lesson they will compare and evaluate 12 possible suspects before deciding on the most likely guilty person. They will then justifying their decision both verbally and in writing. The lesson works as a knockout tournament, comparing two suspects at a time. They must apply the background information presented to them along with the suspect cards to come up with the most plausible answer. It is great for developing higher order thinking skills especially when they have to tease out the strengths and weaknesses of each suspect. It also provides me with some fabulous display ideas using the students work! The lesson contains: - 23 slide powerpoint. -12 Suspect Information cards (on the powerpoint to be printed off in handout mode and cut out - they are in colour and also black and white versions to help you save some ink!) - Information handout sheet ont he five acknowledged victims of Jack the Ripper. - 3 page detailed lesson plan. - Tournament structure handout sheet (also on powerpoint in colour and black and white) - The last task is to write a P.E.E.L. paragraph. The lesson is does not contain any graphic imagery, all photos of the victims are from when they were alive. But the written content on the victims, being as it is about a serial killer, is a bit gory. So I recommend this for high school more than middle school. Thanks for looking! ********************************************************************************************************************* TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. © A. Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Tolland Man Murder Mystery - interpreting evidence using inference

Tolland Man Murder Mystery - interpreting evidence using inference

This lesson is an introduction to the mystery of the Tolland Peat Bog Man and what happened to him. This lesson is designed to get younger KS3 pupils questioning evidence. They have to make a decision as to whether he was murdered, committed suicide or it was an accident. Pupils should work in pairs and the teacher drip feeds the information gradually to encourage pupils to form opinions and have them challenged. They then can present their decision to the rest of the class using the evidence. Contains three worksheets, full lesson plans and a fully animated Powerpoint presentation like a news report.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Medicine Through Time GCSE - The Great Plague 1665 choice worksheet

Medicine Through Time GCSE - The Great Plague 1665 choice worksheet

This resource can be used in lessons as part of a project on The Great Plague of 1665 or as homework assignments. Each task earns a certain number of points and some tasks have the option of earning extra points if they ‘Push themselves’ in an extension. Students have to choose what assignments they want to complete but the total number of points must add up to 10. The worksheet was designed to fit with the UK GCSE (10th/11th grade) exam units on ‘Medicine Through Time’. Tasks include: Devise a timeline. Create a Mindmap of the Great Plague. An extended writing piece (Essay Question) A source analysis of their (or your) choosing. Make up a Facebook profile or Twitter Feed of a key individual at the time. Create their own exam style question and mark scheme Design an information text book page on the topic. Each task has a defined criteria, These are based on the targets of EMERGING, DEVELOPING, SECURING, MASTERING which link most closely with the skills needed in history of identifying, describing, explaining and then evaluating. Again these can be substituted for actual academic grades in either number or letter from spending on your state or country’s criteria. This could be used as part of a unit of study Medicine through time or the Stuarts. The tasks can also be completed using text books or the internet. Great for improving independent learning, my classes have enjoyed them! Thanks for looking and feel free to check out my other resources. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Why did the Romans invade Britain?

Why did the Romans invade Britain?

This is a simple lesson designed to introduce the main reasons the Romans invaded Britain under Caesar. The learning objectives are staggered and your students show their developing knowledge as the lesson goes on by answer set questions. The lesson begins by introducing the Romans Empire and what an empire is. Next the class completes an activity matching the reasons with simple explanations. Finally the class put what they have learnt to use by answering a choice of questions based on ability. The harder question involves weighing up and deciding what they think is the MAIN reason for the Roman invasion. Lesson Includes: 15 slide animated PowerPoint presentation One page worksheet/cardsort. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. © A. Hughes (MsHughesTeaches), 2014 All rights reserved. Graphics on the preview From the Pond http://frompond.blogspot.com
PerfidiaBlackheart
HISTORY MYSTERY: Why did the Great Fire of London Spread so far and so fast?

HISTORY MYSTERY: Why did the Great Fire of London Spread so far and so fast?

This lesson asks the big question ‘why did the Great Fire of London Spread so far and so fast in 1666?’. Your students have to evaluate the evidence available to decide what they think was the biggest contributing factor. Students have to infer and reach a reasoned judgement based on the evidence at hand. This includes primary sources and secondary reports. The class works in pairs or groups to decide why the Great Fire of London was able to spread so far in such a short space of time. They assess the evidence to decide whether the main reason was: -Human mistakes, -Weather conditions -Housing -Firefighting equipment. The evidence is not given to them all at once, instead the teacher drip feeds it throughout the lesson. This is in a bid to challenge preconceived ideas and see if pupils will change their minds when faced with new data or sources. The lesson also works well as a station activity with the children moving around the room to gather information. The last task is to write an extended piece (like a DBQ) explaining what the different factors were and what they believe was the biggest contributing factor to the fire spreading in this way. The lesson fits with the common core requirement for students to analyse, evaluate and consider causation. It is designed for the UK National Curriculum and I have kept in the level descriptors as these may help you with grading your students as they are skill descriptors: ie: identify, then describe then explain then evaluate at the top end of ability. But if not they can be easily deleted from the slides. The zip file contains: fully animated powerpoint Clues from the scene worksheet Answer worksheet 9 minute clip from Charles II: Power and the Passion Full lesson plan description My classes have had great fun with this lesson. It can stand alone or be used a a project, for example on Stuart housing. I hope you find this useful and enjoyable. If you do, please check out my other enquiry lessons like this on various topics and I even have a growing bundle of them in my store. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. © A. Hughes (MsHughesTeaches), 2014 All right
PerfidiaBlackheart
Why couldn't the police catch Jack the Ripper in 1888? Cryptogram Puzzle

Why couldn't the police catch Jack the Ripper in 1888? Cryptogram Puzzle

Can your students work out the puzzle code and find out why the police could not catch Jack the Ripper? It is an interesting topic and works well as a bell ringer or introduction to the topic. It also works well simply as a brain teaser for any topic. Students have to work out the letter/number code and fill in the paragraph accordingly. Five letters have been given already to help start them off. I introduce an element of competition to keep my classes focused. Not only do they have to fill in the paragraph they must pick out at least 3 key facts or inventions and be the first to tell me as the teacher. Keeps the students heads down and learning something! YOU MAY ALSO LIKE MY PUZZLE GROWING BUNDLE IN MY STORE. Thanks for looking! TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved. © A. Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) 2018
PerfidiaBlackheart
What did Jack the Ripper do to his victims?

What did Jack the Ripper do to his victims?

This worksheet covers the details of the five murders officially attributed to Jack the Ripper. The students have to read the information on each victim and complete a table (included) on each woman. The extension question ‘Why might these murders have attracted so much public attention at the time?’ You may also be interested in my complete *History Mystery Lesson on Jack the Ripper suspects * also available in my TES shop. Thank for looking! TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
The Second Red Scare Word Wall Display Flash Cards

The Second Red Scare Word Wall Display Flash Cards

This display packet covers the key individuals and events during the second Red Scare of the 1940s and 1950s. It can be printed out in colour or in greyscale and used on a word wall in your classroom. The resource can also be put into a mind map on your wall - I find this helps my young people to think thematically. ***The packet contains 30 key words including people, places and events. Examples of some of the cards are shown in the preview thumbnails. *** Words and definitions included: Alger Hiss The Rosenbergs Joseph McCarthy Witch hunts Berlin Blockade President Truman Red Scare HUAC Soviet Union Cold War Communism Capitalism The Hollywood Ten The Fifth Amendment FBI Loyalty Boards FELP Senator Tydings The McCarran Act 1950 Multiple Untruth Blacklisted President Eisenhower McCarthy/Army Hearings 1953 Joseph Welch No Smoke Without Fire Espionage Chinese Civil War The Korean War NKVD J Edgar Hoover Joseph Stalin All of the cards contain a definition or description too and I have used pictures to illustrate most of the main words. These can easily be used a flash cards during test preparation and revision. I hope you find this useful and if you do, please leave feedback! Thanks for looking. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Medieval Church and Crusades Homework Booklet

Medieval Church and Crusades Homework Booklet

This homework booklet is designed for classes to use while studying the Crusades of the Middle Ages. It contains 4 ‘homelearnings’ all a worksheet length each. The students are required to complete one every two lessons but could be done for extra credit or at a frequency of your choice. Also would work for several Sub Lessons should you need the cover! Topics include: The Medieval Church hierarchy Pilgrimages Why did the Crusades happen? What did Europe get out of the Crusades? Each homework should take about 30 minutes and the students can use what they have learnt in lessons as well as researching on their own. If you find this lesson useful you might like to have at some of my other Medieval History resources in my shop. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
What happened to the victims of the Black Death in the Middle Ages? THE SYMPTOMS

What happened to the victims of the Black Death in the Middle Ages? THE SYMPTOMS

This lesson explains the physical effects of the Black Death (plague) on its victims in 1348. It also contains details of the cures people tried when they had no idea what was actually causing the disease. The lesson aims to develop the students understanding of the impact of the disease on the victims and then on the extended community in the Medieval period. Product contains: Fully animated PowerPoint. Body outline worksheet to annotate symptoms. A two page task worksheet to complete individually. Full lesson plan. The presentation begins with an ‘odd one out’ task and then a recap of how the disease was actually spread by fleas and black rats. The third part of the lesson describes the physical symptoms of the disease and an explanation of a real ‘cure’ attempted at the time. The class uses this information to complete the first part of the worksheet. Finally they must come up with at least 3 questions they would ask a medieval person if they could. Then they imagine the answers and write them as a first person speech bubble paragraph. I use this lesson as preparation for writing our own historical fiction about the Black Death. It works well for character building and character motivation later on as well as giving them descriptions and information they must include in a piece of historical fiction. Thanks for looking! TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Ms-Hughes-4067 ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
How did William the Conqueror keep control of England? THE DOMESDAY BOOK

How did William the Conqueror keep control of England? THE DOMESDAY BOOK

In 1066 William, Duke of Normandy won the Battle of Hastings defeating King Harold and beginning the Norman Conquest of England. When he came to the throne, William I faced many problems. This lesson focuses on how William dealt with the problem of money. Students learn how the Domesday census was created and used to find out how much to tax his subjects. They look at an extract from the Domesday book to answer questions and create their own small section for their own home, garden or village. When the whole class have created their own entry they could be bound together to make a class Domesday book! The lesson contains: -14 slide animated powerpoint. I use this lesson as part of a series about how Norman King William I conquered England in the Medieval period (Middle Ages). I hope you find this helpful! Thanks for looking. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
The Peasants' Revolt 1381 Full Middle Ages Lesson

The Peasants' Revolt 1381 Full Middle Ages Lesson

MIddle Ages - Power and the People What happened when the Peasants Revolted? This lesson was designed to be taught after a full unit on the Medieval Black Death and it’s consequences, but works just as well as a stand-alone lesson. It can be used as a history lesson or even part of a topic on citizenship and taxation. The Peasants’ Revolt 1381 saw the people of the South East of England rise up and attack London and the King’s advisors over unfair taxation (The Poll Tax). The lesson begins with the causes of the Peasants’ Revolt and students must link them together and ‘make the middle box happen’. This is a good thinking activity to help students to develop their reasoning and explaining skills in history. In the middle box is ‘The Peasants’ Revolt’. In the boxes on the outside are reasons why this happened. They could just draw a line from each cause to the middle box - this would be accurate but does not explain how some causes led to other causes. The children have to create a causation web linking the different reasons, in order. On the lines they have drawn they need to explain using ‘so’ or ‘because’ sentences. Students can use the same box as many times as they like for different causes. FOR EXAMPLE: King Richard II was only 10 years old when he came to the throne in 1377, so he had advisors that the people did not like. In 1377 these advisors brought in the Poll Tax and everyone over 15 had to pay the same amount. This made the peasants angry and led to the Peasants’ revolt. The students could also use the boxes differently and consider long term versus short term causes. They web can then be used as a structure to write a full paragraph on the causes of the Peasants’ Revolt. (A P.E.E.L. structure encourages explanation - see my store for a PEEL writing mat resource)
PerfidiaBlackheart
Who is the most important person in History, ever? History Mystery Enquiry.

Who is the most important person in History, ever? History Mystery Enquiry.

This lesson was designed as part of a unit the significance of individually in history. The main purpose of the unit is to encourage pupils decision-making and reasoning skills in history. Includes: 31 slide PowerPoint. hot air balloon writing worksheet full lesson plan important people word search important people cryptogram How it works: In this lesson students are given cards with information on 10 different people from history and have to imagine they are in a hot air balloon that is plummeting to the earth. With them are these key people BEFORE they have done what they became famous for. Pupils work in pairs to decide who should be thrown out of the balloon and who should be saved based on how important their actions turned out to be for our current lives. The people cards included are as follows. (I would select no more than 10 cards in a lesson) Mahatma Gandhi Alexander Fleming Edward Jenner Martin Luther King Wernher Von Braun George Jennings Albert Einstein Nikola Tesla Leonardo Da Vinci Christopher Columbus Anuria Bevan Oliver Cromwell Alexander Graham Bell William Shakespeare Emmeline Pankhurst. Once each pair has decided on their surviving person they must explain why they saved them on the hot air balloon writing sheet. I have also included two puzzles for early finishers or homework. File includes: Full lesson PowerPoint (31 slides. The people cards should be printed out and used as pair talk cards.) Hot air balloon writing sheet Lesson plan Two puzzles. Thanks for looking! critical thinking - pupil talk - debate - card sort - history - evaluation. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district or school wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Artefacts As Evidence - Time Team Historical Inference Skills

Artefacts As Evidence - Time Team Historical Inference Skills

I created this lesson to help my classes get to grips with inference in history and the use of artefacts. Many young students get stuck at the idea that we can never know what happened in the past because no one alive was there to be our witnesses. This lesson requires students to develop and use their inference skills to work out for themselves what an object is and what it can tell us about the past, its people and in some cases its events. <br /> <br /> YOU NEED TO PROVIDE 6 ARTEFACTS YOURSELF. These are not included in the lesson but should be quite easy to come by. For example I have used a variety of different things - thats the joy of this lesson - including a St. John Ambulance nursing hat that belonged to my mother, a commemorative coin, a ration book (replica from the internet) through to a hand made crucifix from WW2 found a yard sale! I have even used 1980s cassette tapes of music because, scarily, it was ‘historical’ to my students!<br /> <br /> The lesson contains:<br /> 18 slide powerpoint<br /> A worksheet to model inferring with a bejewelled dagger.<br /> 3 differentiated writing frames for the students archeology reports.<br /> Full and detailed lesson plan <br /> <br /> My students have always gotten a great deal form this lesson and helps to develop peer and independent learnings skills. It also forces them to back up their ideas with explanation and consider the ‘most likely’ scenarios.<br /> <br /> I hope you find this lesson useful. I will be putting more History skills lessons in my store soon!<br /> Thanks for looking!
PerfidiaBlackheart
'Yes I can!' in Humanities - Marking grid Rubric for grading

'Yes I can!' in Humanities - Marking grid Rubric for grading

This marking rubric grid is designed to support students Assessment for Learning. The grading criteria for History, Geography and Religious Studies are broken down into skills. It allows your class to mark their own work, peer assess and also to plan how to improve on their next assignments. Teachers can also use it mark assignments easily. I laminate them for my classes as they use them regularly in lessons. They could also be printed out and stuck into the front of the students’ exercise books. If you like this resource, check out my others in my store created to develop students’ understanding in the humanities. Thank you for looking. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Why did Medieval people go on the Crusades? Interactive PowerPoint Adventure

Why did Medieval people go on the Crusades? Interactive PowerPoint Adventure

If you’re looking for a fun and interactive way for your students to learn about the crusades this PowerPoint-based lesson could be for you. It’s based on the idea of ‘choose your own adventure’ games. Students time travel back to Medieval England and find out the reasons why people went on the crusades to Jerusalem. Students have to navigate their way through the presentation making decisions on who they ‘speak’ to and what they read in order to answer the questions on the question sheet. The students then can use their discoveries to answer the ‘mini-essay’ question: Why did people go on Crusade in the Middle Ages? CONTAINS: INTERACTIVE POWERPOINT QUESTION SHEETS MODEL ANSWER SHEETS I have used this with my classes every year and they enjoy it a lot. It’s just a different way to learn the topic or to refresh their memories for a test. If you have access to a computer suite it works very well as an individual or pair lesson but it easily be used in a teacher led lesson with the whole class. I have done this both ways and it has been successful. With older years (Year 7) it would work well as a supplement to a wider unit on the crusades. I hope you like it! If you are interested you might like to check out some of my other ‘Middle Ages’ history lessons in my store. Thanks for looking! TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my shop instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Women's Suffrage Work Booklet - Test Prep and Revision.

Women's Suffrage Work Booklet - Test Prep and Revision.

This booklet contains 33 pages of questions, mind maps, timelines and tables for your students to complete. It is designed to aid your students’ understanding of a complex series of events leading to the women of Great Britain earning the vote. This booklet covers the campaign form beginning to end and students are required to consider who helped and who hindered the campaign for women’s suffrage and the events around the world that impacted it. This book covers the period 1880 - 1918. It has detailed questions and tasks on the following areas: The Absolute Basics Why did women want the vote? The early Suffrage Movement Attitudes to the Suffrage movement. The Political Parties any women suffrage. Militancy and the WSPU The treatment of women in prison. War Work. Source Analysis Practice. The booklet should be completed using class notes, textbooks and the Internet in individually, and can be used as class tasks or as homework in students own time. It works very well as a revision document. I used this with my A Level Students in England but the content is applicable to anyone studying this period of history. I also have other revision booklets available in similar formats but on different topics, please check out my shop. Thanks for looking and I hope this is useful for you and your classes. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Women's Experience in Prison as Suffragettes - Cat and Mouse Act

Women's Experience in Prison as Suffragettes - Cat and Mouse Act

This 9 slide powerpoint is animated with sound effects. It covers the topic of women suffrage campaigners or suffragettes experience in British prisons. Excellent for a unit of women’s history. It contains information and primary sources on: Arrest Hunger striking Forced-feeding Class divide in prison The Cat and Mouse Act 1913 Students are required to answer source based analysis questions through out the presentation. It also contains a short case study and questions to initiate discussion and thinking throughout. the final question based on all the sources and information is “How did the way women were treated in prisons help the suffrage cause?” This was designed for use with A Level Students and has been succesful with Year 9 and GCSE grade classes. TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. ©Amy Hughes (MsHughesTeaches) All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Suffragette! The Campaign for Votes for Women. BUNDLE

Suffragette! The Campaign for Votes for Women. BUNDLE

In this centenary year of the success of the campaign for Womens' Suffrage, these resources can help you to teach your young people how it came about. The resources included are: - A 33 page test prep and study book covering the whole period from 1880 to 1918. Students complete tasks and, fill tables and answer source based questions throughout. - A Suffragette Suicide? History Mystery gets your students to consider the aims of Emily Wilding Davison at the Derby when she was killed by the kings horse. They analyse the evidence to decide what they think she had intended that day. - A PowerPoint on the experience son Suffragettes when they were imprisoned and force feed while on hunger strike. Include primary source analysis. Take a look at the pages for each resource. Excellent all round resources to help your GCSE and A Level students understand and engage with this extremely important period in history.
PerfidiaBlackheart
20th Century American political history BUNDLE

20th Century American political history BUNDLE

***Newly Added - RED SCARE WORD WALL/FLASH CARDS!*** This growing bundle contains 6 RESOURCES on key people and campaigns in 20th century USA. Lessons included look at the presidencies of Herbert Hoover and Bush Sr, as well as the Civil Rights movement and The Red Scare. SAVE OVER 30%
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Events of the English Civil War Living Graph

Events of the English Civil War Living Graph

In this activity, students have to evaluate the impact of certain events during the English Civil War on the two sides. Beginning with the Roundheads they must decide how much each event impacted their fortune in war. Print the graph on A3 size paper and cut out the events cards with one set per pair. Once the students have done that for the Roundheads they must move the cards around the graph to show how the same events impacted the Cavaliers. As an extension I ask my students to think outside the box. For example how would these events impact on a peasant woman that worked for a Monarchist? The aim to get our young people thinking about the effect the same events can happen on different people depending on their background and personal experience. It can also be used to discuss ‘key turning point’ and ‘to what extent…’ questions Then I ask them to write up their findings in an extended answer using the P.E.E.L. structure.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Native American Family Life Worksheet

Native American Family Life Worksheet

This is a two page worksheet with information on the family dynamics of the Plains Tribes at the time of European expansion. It covers briefly how marriage worked in the tribes as well as the roles of parents, children and grandparents. There are 6 comprehension and thinking questions and a table to complete comparing similarities and differences to modern family life. A simple and straight addition to any unit on the indigenous people of the Americas or a s stand alone lesson. May also be of interest to those studying world religions in RE as a comparison activity.
PerfidiaBlackheart