A Level; coasts revision - landforms

A Level; coasts revision - landforms

The lesson introduces the students to the type of examination questions that they can expect and the range of landforms that they are required to know. They are also reminded of what makes a good landforms answer. Firstly, students are given a factual recall test for the different landforms they are required to learn. Answers are provided. Students are the asked to complete flash revision cards for the different landforms. At the end of the lesson is a 40 minute processes and landforms test for the students to undertake as homework or in a subsequent lesson. All resources are include within the PowerPoint.
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A Level; coasts revision lesson - processes

A Level; coasts revision lesson - processes

This lesson aims to revise the key geomorphic preocesses. Answer slides are included within the PowerPoint and all resources are at the end of the PowerPoint. Processes revised include marine/erosion, sub-aerial/weathering, mass movement, waves, wave refraction, sediment cells and LSD. resources included are definition revision cards, landform revision homework sheets. wave characteristic classification and mass movement interpretation.
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GCSE 9-1: Global development - Ethiopia case study

GCSE 9-1: Global development - Ethiopia case study

This bundle contains a series of lessons to teach students about economic development in Ethiopia. it includes the following content: employment structure, population, trade, international investment, aid, political development, climate, ecosystems and location. It also contains a range of teaching and learning strategies including DMEs, story telling, graph and map interpretation and written skills.
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GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, international investment

GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, international investment

Firstly, the students are shown a pie chart of employment structure in Ethiopia. They are asked to classify Ethiopia as either and LIDC or EDC. Next they are shown a diagram of Rostow’s development model and asked to identify which stage Ethiopia is in. This sets the scene for Ethiopia becoming a suitable host country for TNCs. Next the students are given a globalisation glossary most of these terms will be familiar and this activity will act as revision. The students are introduced to what a TNC is and asked to guess what the 10 biggest TNCs are. After that they are given info on some TNCs in Ethiopia and reasons why TNCs locate there and are asked to match the reasons to the company. More than one reason may apply. Next they are asked to classify the advantages and disadvantages of TNCs to Ethiopia. To finish are a selection of 4 mark examination questions about international investment. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Global Development - Ethiopia case study, Political development

GCSE 9-1; Global Development - Ethiopia case study, Political development

In this lesson students will learn about political development in Ethiopia from 1935 and its impacts on the economy. Firstly, the students are given a time line of political developments. The PowerPoint takes each part of the time line in turn so the teacher can explain the developments and their impacts to the students. There are a series of video clips and audio clips to help students develop a greater understanding and appreciation of the changes. Next there is a work sheet included. Students need to complete the PEE paragraphs to explain the impacts of the developments on the economy. This can be assessed using the mark scheme or students can be asked to learn it for a test in a subsequent lesson. To end there is a factual recall quiz with answers. All resources are included within the PowerPoint
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GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, one aid project

GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, one aid project

In this lesson the students will start by being introduced to the problem of water supply in Ethiopia. The students will learn about charity: water - an aid project through a series of clips and photos. Next they will undertake a story telling activity to learn about the aid project through the eyes of 3 characters. They are each given a character and key questions to listen out for the answers to. They are given a note taking sheet. After reading the story once there are comprehension / discussion questions for the students to undertake. Next they are read the story again. After that they get into groups of the same character to ensure they have all the notes from the story. They then get into groups of different characters to share information. After that they take part in an opinion line activity to assess the success of charity:water. This will help them to develop their conclusion writing skills. All resources are included.
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GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, location, climate and ecosystems

GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, location, climate and ecosystems

Firstly, the students are asked to use an atlas to locate a range of features into an outline map of Ethiopia. They are then asked to describe the location of Ethiopia. After that they are asked to use the atlases to create a fact file about Ethiopia. Next they are asked to interpret and describe a climate graph of Ethiopia. Then the students are introduced to the landscape, using photos to show the different physical features. They can locate this information on a map. After that the students are asked to identify the different ecosystems of Ethiopia. They could undertake map comparison to explain why different ecosystems occur in certain areas. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, DME solving trade problems

GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, DME solving trade problems

This lesson is designed to get students thinking about the solutions to the trade deficit that occurs in Ethiopia. Essentially you are trying to get them to think about how to turn primary goods into manufactured goods in order to improve the balance of trade but the students need to discover this for themselves. Start by explaining how rich countries have a trade surplus and poor countries have a trade deficit. Then explain the impact of supply and demand of product prices. Next the students are asked to consider primary goods that could be produced in Africa and to classify them into either limited supply or plentiful supply e.g. diamonds = limited, coffee = plentiful. Next show the students a map showing major mineral exports from a variety of African counties and outline the problems of relying on trading these products. Next get the students in groups of 3-4 to find a map of Ethiopia in their atlases and give them a data sheet with Ethiopian data and UK data for comparison. Also give out a spider diagram sheet with key questions. Students need to consider the changes they would make to improve the balance of trade in Ethiopia and record them on the key question sheet e.g. improving infrastructure, overcoming problems of being land locked, war with Eritrea, drought. The teacher will need to circulate and prompt students and answer questions. At the end select some students to feedback their plans. Finally outline other problems that will also impact on improving the balance of trade. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Global development- Ethiopia case study , population and employment structure

GCSE 9-1; Global development- Ethiopia case study , population and employment structure

Firstly, students are given a set of axes and asked to complete a population pyramid for Ethiopia. They are then asked to use their knowledge of population pyramids to annotate the characteristics of the population e.g. birth rate, death rate, ageing/youthful. Next students are asked to estimate a range of population data for Ethiopia, they are given the UK data to give them a starting point. After that the students are introduced to employment structure and asked to classify a range of jobs into primary, secondary and tertiary. They are then asked to draw / interpret pie charts of employment structure data for Ethiopia and the UK. Next they need to write a comparison of the two pie charts. Finally there is a gap fill exercise describing and explaining the employment structure of Ethiopia. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, trade

GCSE 9-1; Global development - Ethiopia case study, trade

Firstly, the students are given a glossary of trade definitions to complete. Next the students are shown a table of the goods exported from countries at a range of levels of development. Students should be asked to identify the pattern of exports. On slide 4 there are images and text to act as prompts to explain how trade affects development. Next the students are asked to interpret a pie chart showing the share of world trade in ACs, EDCs and LIDCs. After that the students are given data about Ethiopia's imports and exports and asked to identify the impact of trade on the country. Next the students are asked to plot on a map the countries that Ethiopia imports from and exports to. This map can then be used to make links to bilateral aid. Finally, the students are given data about the value of exports and imports in Ethiopia and are asked to assess the impact of trade. All resources are included in the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Global development - core, periphery, Friedman's and Rostow's Model

GCSE 9-1; Global development - core, periphery, Friedman's and Rostow's Model

Firstly, the students are given definitions of core and periphery. Next the students are given maps of a range of countries and asked to shade in where they consider the core to be. As they work through the maps they should increase the accuracy with which they can locate the core, making links to the definition to help them. Next the students are introduced to Friedman's development model and the stages are identified using different countries at different levels of development. After that they are introduced to Rostow's Model of development through a video clip and asked to identify countries from each stage and to classify the countries from each stage into ACs, EDCs and LIDCs. Next there is a card sort to complete to show cumulative causation, which occurs in the core. This can be reversed to show the downward spiral of deprivation, which occurs in the periphery. Then there are some discussion questions and an extension question from Wider World.
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GCSE 9-1; Global development - Aid

GCSE 9-1; Global development - Aid

This lesson is designed to teach the students about the different types of aid and to identify the advantages and disadvantages of different types of aid. To start the students are asked to consider where aid is needed at the moment and what type of aid they have given recently. Next there is a video clip introducing the different types of aid. After that they are given definitions of the main types of aid including multi-lateral aid, bilateral aid and voluntary aid. They are then asked to classify the advantages and disadvantages of this aid. Next, there is a recall quiz to test the students understanding of these terms. After that the class is split into groups of four. Each group is given a disaster card, aid costs sheet and aid package sheet. The students are asked to identify which aid is needed in the immediate, short and long term. They are then asked to refine their ideas to fit a budget of 700 units. You can also dish out chance cards to groups, which may benefit or disadvantage their aid package. Some groups can share their aid package plans with the class. The plenary is a cartoon interpretation activity. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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A Level; volcanoes - Mount Ontake, Japan case study

A Level; volcanoes - Mount Ontake, Japan case study

The lesson includes causes, effects, prevention, prediction and responses to the volcano. Firstly, the students are introduced to Mount Ontake and its tectonic setting. there is a gap fill activity for the students to complete, which forms an explanation of how the eruption occurred. Next there are two clips of the eruption occurring to build up a sense of place and an awareness of the size, scale and form of the eruption. Next is a series of photos of the eruption and a classification activity involving case study facts (answers included). This is followed by a series of clips and information about prediction, prevention and solutions. Finally there is a case study quiz to test the students knowledge of the facts. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Climate change - The Big Dry, Australia El Nino drought case study

GCSE 9-1; Climate change - The Big Dry, Australia El Nino drought case study

This lesson is a case study of the Big Dry, Australia. The lesson starts by recapping El Nino and explaining how this causes drought. There is an examination question and mark scheme and a gap fill exercise, which develops into a model answer for this question when complete. Next the students are introduced to the effects of drought in Australia via a YouTube clip and photographs of the effects. The students are given the task of classifying facts about the effects into social and economic categories before using these and making links between them to construct PEE paragraphs. One paragraph ahs been completed for them and they are required to write two of their own. After that the students are given a table of adaptations. They have to classify these by scale before selecting the adaptation that they believe to be the most effective and justifying their choice. All resources are included in the PowerPoint.
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A Level; management strategies to protect the global carbon cycle

A Level; management strategies to protect the global carbon cycle

In this lesson students are introduced to a range of strategies to manage the global carbon cycle. these include afforestation, wetland restoration, improving agricultural practices, the Kyoto protocol and the Paris agreement. Students work in groups with flip chart paper or on computer to design a presentation to teach each other about their management strategy. In formation about afforestation, wetland restoration, improving agricultural practices can be found in the OCR A Level textbook. Information on the Kyoto protocol and the Paris agreement are included within the presentation. There is a note taking sheet for pupils to complete. Also included is a gap fill paragraph about carbon trading by REDD+ in the Amazon. Further info on this scheme is included in a lesson as part of the Amazon case study: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/a-level-case-study-of-a-rainforest-impacts-of-management-on-water-and-carbon-cycles-11694328. After that the students are required to evaluate the schemes and decide which 2 schemes would have the biggest impact on the global carbon cycle and why. All resources are included within the PowerPoint
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A Level; Management strategies to protect the global water cycle

A Level; Management strategies to protect the global water cycle

The aim of the lesson is to construct PEE paragraphs that could form part of an essay. Included in this lesson are a wide range of strategies from Pickering Beck Flood alleviation scheme to Walker's Crisp factory to drip irrigation systems. The lesson starts by introducing the key ways in which to manage the water cycle and also by identifying which areas f the world have water scarcity. Next the students discuss how water meters can be used to manage domestic water use. There are two responses one shown as basic answer and a much more thorough answer, as an example of what they are aiming to produce during the lesson. There is a writing frame to remind them how to construct effective PEE paragraphs as well as a suggested list of connectives. The management solutions include forestry techniques, water allocation (domestic, industrial and agricultural) and drainage basin management. There are examples of strategies from LIDCs and ACs. More information is provided than is needed by the students so they can select the strategies they find most interesting. All resources are included within the PowerPoint.
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A level; Water and carbon cycle changes over time and managenment.

A level; Water and carbon cycle changes over time and managenment.

the resources are designed for use with the new Geography A Level. Included in this bundle are the dynamic equilibrium in the carbon and water cycles, land use changes impact on the cycles, water extraction, positive and negative feedback impact on the cycles, short term, medium term and long term impact on the cycles, research and monitoring of changes in the cycles and finally how the cycles can be managed.
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A Level; Impacts of fossil fuel combustion and carbon sequestration on the carbon cycle

A Level; Impacts of fossil fuel combustion and carbon sequestration on the carbon cycle

Firstly, students are asked to interpret a cartoon of fossil fuel combustion. After that they are introduced to a range of facts about fossil fuel combustion and asked to evaluate which is most concerning. Next there is a clip about carbon, capture and storage, followed by more information about the process. Students need to write their own explanation of the process. Next the students are introduced to the CCS project at Peterhead in Scotland. Students are given information about the project and asked to identity the advantages and disadvantages before evaluating the scheme. Finally, it is revealed that the project was cancelled due to costs. This will exemplify the short term approach of governments to environmental issues.
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A Level; The impacts of water extraction

A Level; The impacts of water extraction

Firstly, the students are introduced to the key terminology relating to water extraction. Next students will comprehend a newspaper article to evaluate the impacts of water extraction from the aquifer surrounding Beijing. Next the students will study surface extraction on the Tigris and Euphrates and convert this information into a mind map. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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A Level; water and carbon cycle: positive & negative feedback, short term changes & Spearmans rank

A Level; water and carbon cycle: positive & negative feedback, short term changes & Spearmans rank

Firstly, students are introduced to positive and negative feedback. They are then given examples of positive and negative feedback in the water and carbon cycles. they are required to order the statements to demonstrate feedback (answers provided). Next the students are asked to use the resources provided to explain the impacts of diurnal changes in solar radiation, seasonal changes in sunlight, temperature and foliage. Next there is a Spearman's rank activity. This requires pupil to develop a null hypothesis, calculate Spearman's rank and assess the significance of the results. This is designed to be set either as a test or homework activity for the students to complete independently (answers provided). All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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