Thinking skills; Geography decision making role play bundle

Thinking skills; Geography decision making role play bundle

Included are a series of lessons involving decision making and role play activities for use with 11-18 classes. They are designed to allow pupils to demonstrate higher level skills from Bloom's taxonomy but in a supported manner. As well as including role play cards and DME grids and resources, the lessons also incorporate a range of other strategies to increase engagement.
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Thinking skills; Geography story telling bundle

Thinking skills; Geography story telling bundle

Included are a range of story telling lessons, designed to develop the students understanding of an issue through different people's eyes. The lessons include both local and international examples for use with KS3 and KS4. These allow students to learn about an issue, recording facts and figures for use in case studies in some instances, in others the stories are used to increase empathy.
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A Level; Arctic - water and carbon cycle

A Level; Arctic - water and carbon cycle

This bundle contains a series of whole lessons and resources designed for the new A2 Level course. It looks at the Tundra environment before considering the impacts on the water and carbon cycles. Next it considers the impact of gas and oil production and exploration on the water and carbon cycle. Finally, there are strategies to reduce these impacts.
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A Level; Arctic - Oil and gas in the Arctic Tundra - decision making exercise

A Level; Arctic - Oil and gas in the Arctic Tundra - decision making exercise

This is a debate / decision making exercise and should take place over a couple of lessons, one to plan and one to undertake the debate. Firstly, there are two video clips about the oil industry in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in order to develop the students sense of place. Next, based on a geofile (website for access supplied) students should evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of oil and gas production and consumption in Prudhoe Bay. After that students are split into 4 groups. Each group is given a character card with details about their viewpoint and a writing frame. Using the writing frame and geofile students should develop a speech about their views on oil and gas production and exploration in Prudhoe Bay. This will take 2 lessons. In the third lesson the groups should give their presentations. whilst speaking sheets are provided to take notes on the viewpoints of others and writing down questions to ask them. After every speech undertake a discussion activity based on what has been said. Then debate the two key questions once everyone has spoken. Next the students will be asked to suggest compromises and work towards and agreement, before final voting. AT the end pupils will be asked to complete and opinion line task for both the questions and to feedback the reasons for their opinions. The resources are deigned to increase pupil engagement. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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A level; Arctic - Arctic tundra water cycle

A level; Arctic - Arctic tundra water cycle

Students start by drawing the water cycle on a partially completed Arctic Tundra background. Next students add additional annotations of how the water cycle would change in Arctic conditions. Then the students are given specific information about how the water cycle is altered in the Arctic to add to a new diagram. Finally, students are asked to compare the water cycle in the rainforest to the tundra. They are required to include factual information in these annotations.
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A Level; Arctic - Tundra carbon cycle

A Level; Arctic - Tundra carbon cycle

The lesson starts by asking the students to recall and classify the inputs, outputs, processes and stores of the carbon cycle. Next the students are asked to produce a diagram of the carbon cycle and then to adjust it to reflect the carbon cycle in the Arctic Tundra. After that students are given specific information on the changes and asked to annotate these onto a new diagram of the carbon cycle. Finally the students are asked to compare the carbon cycle in the rainforest to the tundra, including specific information.
ReallyGoodGeography
A Level; Arctic - Impacts of Gas and oil Production in the Tundra on the water and carbon cycles

A Level; Arctic - Impacts of Gas and oil Production in the Tundra on the water and carbon cycles

Firstly, students are introduced via photos to the causes of permafrost melting in the Tundra. Next the students are given 4-5 impacts and asked to undertake research into these impacts, specifically focusing on the Prudhoe Bay. They are required to explain these, using factual information and then to annotate their findings onto a diagram. Finally, students are asked to evaluate whether the impacts of melting permafrost have a bigger impact on the water or carbon cycle, justifying their explanation.
ReallyGoodGeography
A Level; Arctic - Strategies to reduce the impacts of oil  production on the water and carbon cycles

A Level; Arctic - Strategies to reduce the impacts of oil production on the water and carbon cycles

The includes two lessons. In the first lesson students will research into strategies implemented to reduce the impact of the oil and gas industry on the water and carbon cycles. The second will involve students giving presentations, with PowerPoint presentations and information sheets. The students are split into six groups, each with a strategy such as insulated ice and gravel pads. They split up the three tasks (presentation, speech and information sheet) within their group and are given information about what to research and how they will be marked. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
ReallyGoodGeography
A level: Arctic - Introduction to the Arctic Tundra

A level: Arctic - Introduction to the Arctic Tundra

This lesson introduces the students to the environment that they will be studying. Firstly the students are asked to summarise what they already know about the Arctic Tundra. Next they are split into 3 groups, each group has a pack of resources. The packs include information about location, climate and vegetation. A note taking sheet is provided. Students have 8 minutes with each pack in order to take notes. To test their understanding each group is given one topic to give a presentation on. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE9-1; Climate - Evidence of climate change

GCSE9-1; Climate - Evidence of climate change

In this lesson pupils will learn about the pieces of evidence that can be used to show climate change and their limitations. The lesson starts by asking students to suggest evidence that can be used to show climate change. Next students use information sheets to take notes of the evidence of climate change, where they occur, how they work and any limitations. The evidence includes dendrochronology, ice cores, cave paintings, paintings and diaries and global temperature recordings. There is an answer sheet provided. For the plenary students are required to undertake examination questions relating to the evidence. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Climate - Evaluating the effects of global warming

GCSE 9-1; Climate - Evaluating the effects of global warming

The lesson is an opportunity for students to work in small groups to write persuasive speeches and give presentations. The lesson starts by students working in pairs to recall key terminology. Next students are given maps of the UK and the world showing gains and losses from global warming (taken from Wider World). They have to highlight these images picking out the 3 most important gains and losses on each image. Next the class is split into groups with a specific remit e.g. UK gains from global warming. They are given a persuasive writing fame and asked to write a speech convincing the class of their viewpoint. The most able students in the class should be given the 'losses vs gains' speech as this is the most challenging. Prior to the speeches go through the dos and don'ts to help improve the quality of the speeches. Finally finish with an opinion line, selecting a few students to justify their opinions.
ReallyGoodGeography
GCSE 9-1; Climate - explaining the effects of global warming

GCSE 9-1; Climate - explaining the effects of global warming

This lesson will focus on students producing high quality explanatory written work. To start students explain the greenhouse effect and global warming to one another in pairs. Next they discuss why sea level has risen over the last 20 years. The prediction on the next slides shows students what their answer is likely to be and how you plan to develop and improve their answers during the lesson. Next split the students into 8 groups of 3-4. Give each group a resource and ask them to read it and interpret the images in silence for 2 minutes. They then discuss it as a group to develop the understanding of the weaker students. Finally, they use the writing frame to produce a high quality PEE paragraph. This is repeated for each of the 4 resources/effects of global warming. Next there are some exemplar examination questions for pupils to discuss / attempt. The plenary is a 'pimp my answer' activity. There is a poorly written answer, which they have to improve form memory to make it amazing. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Climate - Global climates and global atmospheric circulation - atmospheric cells

GCSE 9-1; Climate - Global climates and global atmospheric circulation - atmospheric cells

This lesson starts with an opportunity to revise ecosystems. Students are tested on climate data, photographs and ecosystems and food webs associated with different ecosystems. Next the students are introduced to the Polar, Ferrel and Haley cells, their discovery and characteristics. Next students should take notes on the weather associated with high and low pressure. After that the students are given climate graphs from around the globe and by looking at the rainfall data are asked to decided if there is high or low pressure. They then use their atlases to find out the latitude, which they label on a globe (answers provided). Finally, they are introduced to the weather between 30oN and S of the equator around the ITCZ and are asked to describe and then explain the weather that occurs (answers provided). All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
ReallyGoodGeography
GCSE 9-1; Climate - Tropical storms characteristics and super typhoon Haiyan

GCSE 9-1; Climate - Tropical storms characteristics and super typhoon Haiyan

This lesson will give the students the opportunity to learn about the location, causes, measurement and effects of tropical storms. This will be initially general before focusing on super typhoon Haiyan. the lesson starts by introducing the students to what tropical storms are, where they occur and what they are called. To add to the information there are two video clips, one the hurricane song and a second a short information clip about tropical storms. Next the students are introduced to the features of tropical storms and how they are measured. After that the lesson focuses on super typhoon Haiyan which hit the Philippines in 2013. Firstly, there is a skills activity where the students plot the track of the typhoon using longitude and latitude. Next the students are introduced tot he damaging effects through a series of photographs. After that they are asked to classify facts about the causes and effects on a mind map. Finally they are asked to interpret a graph about the frequency of tropical storms and to consider whether or not they are becoming more frequent.
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GCSE 9-1; Climate - El Niño and La Niña

GCSE 9-1; Climate - El Niño and La Niña

This lesson starts by giving the students to take lecture notes on El Niño and La Niña. Next they are introduced to the normal weather conditions in the Pacific before being given diagrams of the normal conditions and El Niño so they can spot the difference. Students are then introduced tot he characteristics of El Niño. After that they are introduced to the characteristics of La Niña. In order to develop their understanding the students are then required to produced their own annotated diagrams of El Niño and La Niña on a base map they are given. To further secure their understanding they undertake a discussion activity in pairs. To test their understanding students complete a summary table (answers provided). Next there is an examination questions for students to test their understanding (answer provided). Finally there is a whiteboard quiz. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
ReallyGoodGeography
GCSE 9-1; Climate - Climate change during the Quaternary

GCSE 9-1; Climate - Climate change during the Quaternary

This lesson starts by students interpreting temperature graphs of the quaternary showing different time scales. Next the students create a timeline from 14,000BP to the present day. They label the different climatic periods during this time and ad photos showing the different climatic features. Finally they annotate important characteristics for different climates, using a table of information to help them to do this. An answer sheet is included. To finish there is a quiz to test their knowledge of the changes. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
ReallyGoodGeography
GCSE 9-1; Climate - Natural causes of climate change

GCSE 9-1; Climate - Natural causes of climate change

The first activity involves students making a teaching resource on flipchart paper, using an information sheet they are given. The three natural causes of climate change studied are Milankovitch cycles, tectonic activity and sunspots. After 15 minutes the students should give presentations about their cause to the other groups who make notes. A note taking sheet is provided and a set of answers. Next there is an examination question about the causes of climate change. After that is a whiteboard quiz to test the students recall of the facts from the lesson. Finally students are introduced to the enhanced greenhouse effect - climate change caused by humans. They undertake a gap fill activity to explain in detail the greenhouse effect. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
ReallyGoodGeography
GCSE 9-1; Climate - The enhanced greenhouse effect and global warming

GCSE 9-1; Climate - The enhanced greenhouse effect and global warming

In this lesson students will learn about the causes of the enhance greenhouse effect. Students start the lesson with a gap fill activity explaining the greenhouse effect. Next they are introduced to the composition of the atmosphere and which gases are greenhouse gases before defining the enhanced greenhouse effect. Then the students will complete flow charts about how methane and carbon dioxide is produced, these will be enhanced by selecting factual information from a sheet to apply to the flow charts. After that students will practice their graphical skills deciding whether a data set is discrete or continuous and selecting a graph to draw, before plotting a pie chart accurately using a protractor. Finally, there is a multiple choice examination question to finish the lesson. All resources are provided at the end of the PowerPoint.
ReallyGoodGeography
GCSE 9-1; Coral Reef Ecosystems

GCSE 9-1; Coral Reef Ecosystems

This bundle includes lessons on the coral reef ecosystem and nutrient cycling within it, the different types of coral reef and how they evolve from one to another and a case study. The case study is of the threats to coral reefs in St Lucia and how these threats have been managed. There are also opportunities to evaluate the success of the management. The lessons are designed to fit the new GCSE specifications and contain all the resources needed within them.
ReallyGoodGeography
GCSE 9-1; Ecosystems - threats to coral reefs in St Lucia

GCSE 9-1; Ecosystems - threats to coral reefs in St Lucia

The lesson starts by asking the students to consider how different parts of the reef ecosystem are interdependent. It then reminds the students of the value of reefs. Next there is a map interpretation activity showing areas of reef that are under threat followed by a you tube clip. Students are then split into groups and given a threat to coral reef in St Lucia information sheet. there are four sheets; fishing, tourism, bleaching and disease. They are asked to create a teaching resource to use to teach their peers. there is also a rate my teacher mark scheme for the students to assess each other and a note taking sheet to encourage the students to use PEE paragraphs. These can be marked using the 8 mark, mark scheme provided. There is also a threats to coral reef homework activity provided. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
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GCSE 9-1; Ecosystems - coral reef management, St Lucia

GCSE 9-1; Ecosystems - coral reef management, St Lucia

In this lesson students will start by recalling the threats to coral from the previous coral threats lesson. There is a speaking frame for them to explain these fully and a copy of the note taking resources. Next the students will be introduced to the Soufriere Marine Management Area and will identify features of this using a sketch map. After that the students will be read an extract about the management area, how it was set up, what the different parts are, how it is sustainable and its advantages and disadvantages. The first time they hear they extract they should draw what they hear, making sketches and using numbers and symbols to focus on important information. The second time they hear it they add written notes. Pupils should then get into small groups of 3-4 and compare notes, adding any missing details. There is an examination question for them to tackle with a mark scheme to stick in their books including ebi and www comments. Finally there is a quiz to test the students recall of the facts. All resources are included at the end of the PowerPoint.
ReallyGoodGeography