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I am a secondary school & A-level Science teacher, specialising in Biology. I am also an experienced AQA GCSE Biology Examiner. My resources contain a mix of Biology, Chemistry and Physics lessons aimed at meeting specification points for the new AQA Trilogy GCSE course and KS3 Activate course. All of my lessons include at least one opportunity for self-assessment, a range of activities to suit students of all abilities, a set of differentiated starter questions and a plenary.

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I am a secondary school & A-level Science teacher, specialising in Biology. I am also an experienced AQA GCSE Biology Examiner. My resources contain a mix of Biology, Chemistry and Physics lessons aimed at meeting specification points for the new AQA Trilogy GCSE course and KS3 Activate course. All of my lessons include at least one opportunity for self-assessment, a range of activities to suit students of all abilities, a set of differentiated starter questions and a plenary.
NEW AQA Trilogy GCSE (2016) Biology - Plant diseases & responses HT
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NEW AQA Trilogy GCSE (2016) Biology - Plant diseases & responses HT

(4)
This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Biology GCSE, particularly the 'Infection & Response' SoW for the higher tier. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The first part of this lesson is a recap on the plant diseases students should have already covered within the 'infection & response' unit - rose black stop and tobacco mosaic virus. Plants will then be asked to come up with a brainstorm of the symptoms plants may exhibit when they are diseased. Once pupils have discussed this and tried to come up with some ideas you can reveal some of the common symptoms on the PowerPoint slide, along with images and examples. The next slide looks at the ways in which plant diseases can be diagnosed, from gardening manuals to monoclonal antibody testing kits. The next activity focuses on the role of certain minerals in the growth and development of plants, firstly students will draw a table in their book and then they will given a slip of information about one of the mineral ions - nitrates, magnesium or potassium. Pupils will need to walk around the room or swap these slips of paper with people on the same table as them to complete the table, they can then assess their work. The final part of the lesson focuses on plant defence responses, firstly pupils will be shown some diagrams of plants and their defence methods and will be asked to think > pair > share the potential ways plants can defend against disease. Pupils will then be given a card sort with different plant defence mechanisms, students need to sort these into three different categories - physical barrier, chemical barrier, defence against herbivore. Once completed pupils can then assess their work using the answers provided. The final task is an exam-style question on what they have learnt that lesson, pupils of higher ability may want to complete these questions in silence at the backs of their book. Pupils can then self or peer-assess their work. Plenary activity is to write 3 key words, 2 facts and 1 question about what pupils have learnt that lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Rates of Reaction
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Rates of Reaction

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the ‘Rates of Reaction’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience This lesson begins with a ‘Think, Pair, Share’ task to get students thinking about what the rate of a reaction tells us about that chemical reaction. After a short partner and class discussion, the answer can be revealed to the class via the PowerPoint slide. This is followed by a task whereby students need to place a mixture of chemical reactions in order of their speed, getting students to think about which of these reactions might have the fastest rate of reaction. Students are then introduced to the two ways in which scientists can measure the rate of reaction - how much product formed/how much reactant is used up over a given time. Students will be asked to read some information about this topic and then answer questions on it, this work can be self-assessed using the answers provided in the PowerPoint. Students will then watch a video on how to calculate the rate of a reaction using a graph, students can self-assess their answers using those provided in the PowerPoint presentation. Students will then practice these skills by plotting a graph using a set of data, which they will then need to use to answer a set of questions, this can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. The next video outlines how students can use a graph to a work out the rate of a reaction at a fixed point, students will answer questions whilst watching the video and then self-assess their work using the answers provided. Lastly, students will again practice this skill by plotting a graph using data provided and then will need to use the graph to work out the rate of reaction at different fixed points. This work can be self-assessed using the answers provided. The plenary task is is for pupils to complete one of a choice of sentences starters, which would summarize what they have learned this lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016)  Chemistry - Water Treatment
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Water Treatment

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the 'Earth’s Atmosphere’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience Pupils will firstly come up with a mind map of ideas about why water is such an important resource, they can discuss with their partner and write their ideas in their books. Some of the reasons can then be revealed via the PowerPoint presentation and pupils can assess their work - making corrections where necessary. Pupils are then shown a quick recap of the stages involved in the water cycle, before beginning to look at the treatment of fresh water and purification of salt water. Students will be given a worksheet of questions, around the room will be information sheet on how fresh water is turned into potable, drinking water and how sea water is purified. Pupils will need to read the information posters to answer their questions, this work can then be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. The next part of the lesson will focus on waste water treatment, pupils will watch a video on the steps involved with sewage treatment. Pupils will answer a set of questions whilst watching the video, this work can then be self-assessed using the answers provided. The final task is for pupils to complete an exam-style question on this topic, they can answer in their books and either self or peer assess using the mark scheme provided. Finally, pupils will be given a set of answers, they will need to come up with questions which match these answers. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry  - Making Fertilisers
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Making Fertilisers

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the 'Earth’s Atmosphere’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience Firstly, students are shown how to ammonia produced in the Haber process is reacted with different acids to form different ammonium compounds before being used in fertilisers. Firstly, students will investigate how to produce ammonium sulphate in the lab - they will be provided with a practical worksheet which they will need to work their way through in pairs. This involves a titration, which they should have carried out before, their results can be recorded in the table provided on the worksheet. Next, pupils will watch a video on the production and use of fertilisers - using the information provided int he video a set of questions needs to be answered. This work can then be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. Lastly, pupils will be given a set of information about how fertilisers are made in the lab compared to being made by chemical industry. Using this information students will need to complete a comparison table which focuses on starting materials, equipment, safety, yield and running costs. This work can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. The plenary task requires pupils to write three quiz questions to test their peers knowledge on what they have learned during the lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Physics - Specific Latent Heat
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Physics - Specific Latent Heat

(1)
This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Physics GCSE, particularly the 'Molecules & Matter’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience This lesson begins with a recap on ‘Latent Heat’, including a definition and task which requires students to sketch a temperature-time graph of ice which has been taken out of the freezer and heated at a constant rate for a period of time. They will then need to match a set of statements to stages shown on the graph, this task will then be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. Students are then introduced to the idea of ‘Specific Latent Heat of Fusion’ - firstly students are given a description of what this tells us about a substance and then also the calculation. Students can take notes on this in their books, the next task then requires students to rearrange the equation they have been given to work out either energy (J) or mass (kg). Once students have discussed their ideas, the answers can be revealed and then pupils can work their way through a set of problems. This work can then be self-assessed using the mark scheme included in the PowerPoint. The next part of the lesson now focuses on ‘Specific Latent Heat of Vaporisation’ - students are again given a description of what this tells us about a substance and also the calculation is provided. Students can take notes and also try to rearrange the equation in order to make energy or mass the subject. Students can discuss their ideas, the answers are revealed and they will then use these calculations to work their way through a set of problems. Lastly, students will watch a video and will need to answer a set of questions whilst watching, this work can be checked against the answers provided. Then the very last task is a past-paper question on the topic, students can self-assess or peer-assess their work on this topic. The plenary requires pupils to write a WhatsApp message to a friend, explaining what they have learned this lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - The History & Evolution of Our Atmosphere
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - The History & Evolution of Our Atmosphere

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the ‘Earth’s Atmosphere’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The lesson begins by looking at the percentage of different gases in our atmosphere today compared to 3 billions years ago, this then follows into a task whereby pupils will need to walk around the room to read information posters on the evolution of our atmosphere. Using the information they will need to complete a set of questions, this work can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. The next part of the lesson focuses on theories of how life evolved on Earth, to begin with students need to ‘Think > Pair > Share’ their ideas about the conditions needed for life on Earth. Once this has been discussed as a class, some of the factors can be revealed on the PowerPoint presentation and one of the theories of how life evolved is outlined, using an animation. Pupils will now complete a mid-lesson progress check, this task can be self-assessed once complete. The next task requires pupils to construct a time-line of events outlining the history of the evolution of the Earth’s atmosphere and life on on Earth given the information they have learned so far this lesson. Pupils can self/peer assess their work using the mark scheme provided in the PowerPoint. The final task is for pupils to discuss their ideas about how carbon dioxide levels decreased so dramatically from being the majority of the Earth’s atmosphere to now only 0.04%. Pupils can mind map their ideas, before the answers are revealed using the PowerPoint. The plenary task is for pupils to complete a 3-2-1 of what they have learned during the lesson - 3 facts, 2 key words and 1 question. All resources are included within the PowerPoint presentation, if you have any questions please email me at swift.education.uk@gmail.com. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated :) Thanks!
NEW AQA GCSE (2016)  Chemistry - Dynamic Equilibrium & Altering Conditions
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Dynamic Equilibrium & Altering Conditions

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the ‘Rates of Reaction’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The lesson begins with a ‘Think > Pair > Share’ task whereby students need to consider what it means for a reaction to be in ‘equilibrium’ . After a class discussion, the definition of a reversible reaction (in a closed system) to be at equilibrium is revealed to the class, which they can note down in their books. This is further explained using a set of diagrams to depict what happens to the concentration of reactants and products during the course of a reversible reaction. Students can sketch a graph into their book to show how the equilibrium of a reversible reaction is reached. The next task focuses on ‘Le Chatelier’s Principle’, students are firstly introduced to the idea that the equilibrium of a reversible reaction can be altered by changing the conditions of that reaction, i.e. an increase in temperature. Students will then be shown a set of demonstrations (video links included) for each they will need to note down their observations, identify the conditions which are changing and match the correct reaction to the correct word equation. Pupils will complete a worksheet for this task, which will be assessed using the mark scheme provided. For the next part of the lesson, students will watch a video on the effect of pressure on equilibrium and answer a set of questions. These questions can be self-assessed using the answers provided on the PowerPoint. Students will now ‘Think > Pair > Share’ the effect of an increase in temperature on the equilibrium of a reversible reaction, the answer is then revealed to pupils using an example. Pupils will now complete a ‘Quick Check’ task where they will be required to answer a set of questions about the reversible reactions and the effect of altering conditions on dynamic equilibrium. Pupils can self-assess their work using the answers provided on the PowerPoint. Finally, students will need to complete a summary sheet on the effect of pressure and temperature on the equilibrium of a reversible reactions, students can self assess their work using the answers provided. The plenary task requires pupils to write down three sentences to summarise what they have learnt in today’s lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
KS3 ~ Year 8 ~ The Carbon Cycle
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KS3 ~ Year 8 ~ The Carbon Cycle

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This lesson is designed for the KS3 Year 8 Science course, specifically the C2 1.4 unit on ‘The Earth’. For more lessons designed for KS3 and KS4 please visit my shop at: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience. Students will firstly be introduced to carbon as being one of the main constituents of life, as it is present within many molecules inside the human body - DNA, carbohydrates, fats & proteins. Students will also be introduced to the idea of ‘carbon sinks’. Students will now watch a video on the carbon cycle, students will need to answer a set of questions whilst watching this video. This task can then be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. Next, students will be given a ‘fill-in-the-blank’ task to complete using the key words provided on the PowerPoint presenation. Students can self-assess their work using the mark scheme provided once this task is complete. Next, students will watch another video on the processes involved in the Carbon Cycle. Whilst watching this video they will be given a number of captions, which they will need to use in oder to fill in blanks on a worksheet. This task can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided, once it is complete. Lastly, students will be given a series of pictures and words/descriptions which they need to use in order to construct their own poster of the carbon cycle, they will need to add arrows to demonstrate where the carbon is moving from and to. This task can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided on the PowerPoint presentation. The final task requires students to read of piece of information, using this they should discuss and write down some changes that we could implement at home, and on a national scale, to help reduce our carbon emissions. The plenary is a ‘pick a plenary’ task, students will either choose to write down a summary of what they have learned this lesson in three sentences, or they may choose to write definitions for a set of key words that are provided. All resources are included at the end of the presentation, thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Physics - Atoms & Radiation
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Physics - Atoms & Radiation

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Physics GCSE, particularly the 'Molecules & Matter’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The lesson begins with an introduction to radiation, firstly looking at background radiation. Students are given some time to discuss on their tables, the sources of background radiation. After students have fed into a class discussion the answers can be revealed on the PowerPoint. Next, students are shown some data on the sources of background radiation. Students will be required to answer a set of questions about this data, they can complete the work in their books and the mark scheme is provided on the PowerPoint. Next, students are introduced to Marie Curie and her work towards radioactivity. The students will be given a list of questions and they will need to answer these using the video, the answers to which are then included so students can self-assess their work. Students will then be asked to consider the safety rules when dealing with an radioactive substances before a teacher demonstration is carried out using a Geiger-Muller counter. Student are asked to observe the demo and also record their observations and answer a set of questions. This can then be marked using the mark scheme provided. The last task requires pupils to complete a summary worksheet on radiation, this work can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. The plenary activity is an exit card, students will need to write down three things they learned during the lesson, five key words and one questions to test their peers knowledge of the lesson content. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Natural polymers & DNA
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Natural polymers & DNA

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the ‘Organic Chemistry’ SoW. Firstly, pupils will need to complete a ‘True or False’ activity on carbohydrates, they will then be shown how polysaccharides are made from monosaccharides via a condensation reaction, as an example of a natural polymer. Pupils will also be provided with information on the structure of starch and glycogen ad how this relates to the function of these two polymers. Another example of a natural polymer are polypeptides/proteins which are made up of the monomers - amino acids. Again, pupils will be shown how a condensation reaction occurs to link together many amino acids molecules in a long polypeptide chain. Pupils will now complete a ‘Quick Check’ task to test their knowledge of what they learned so far this lesson, the answers to the questions will be provided in the PowerPoint for students to assess their own work. The next part of the lesson will focus on DNA as a natural polymer. Firstly, pupils will need to order the structures given in order of size - DNA, gene, chromosome, nucleus, cell. Next, pupils will watch a video on the structure and function of DNA and will need to answer a set of questions. This work can then be self-assessed using the answers provided in the PowerPoint. A diagram is then shown highlighting some of the key structural features of a double-helix DNA molecule, which pupils need to know and remember. The final task is a ‘Quick Check’ activity on the structure & function of DNA, students will need to answer the questions in their books and then peer or self-assess their work using the mark scheme provided. The plenary task is for pupils to write three quiz questions for pupils to test their peers knowledge of the topic learned in the lesson today. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry  - Reaction Profiles & Bond Energy Calculations
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Reaction Profiles & Bond Energy Calculations

(1)
This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the ‘Chemical changes, electrolysis and energy changes’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The first task is a recap on the differences between endothermic and exothermic reactions, students will need to complete a fill-in-the blank task which can then be self-assessed using the answers provided. Next, students are introduced to reaction profiles with a diagram to demonstrate what is happening during an exothermic chemical reaction. Students will then be asked to use mini-whiteboards to draw a reaction profile for an endothermic reaction, they can check their ideas using the answer provided in the PowerPoint. The next slide shows the reaction profiles for both an endothermic and exothermic reaction, as well as an explanation of the energy changes which take place during these types of reaction. Pupils can take notes from this slide, including sketching a diagram of the two reaction profiles. The next task is for pupils to complete is a progress check to assess their understanding of what they have learned so far, once complete pupils can self-assess or peer-assess their work using the answers provided. Next, pupils will watch a video on activation energy, they will need to answer a set of questions using the information provided in the video. Pupils can self-assess their work using the mark scheme provided in the PowerPoint. The next part of the lesson focuses on bond breaking/making and bond energies. Firstly, students are shown (using a diagram to demonstrate) what happens, in terms of energy changes, when bonds are broken or when bonds form during a chemical reaction. Students can then summarise what they have learnt so far by completing a fill-in-the-blank task, this task can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. Lastly, students are introduced to bond energies and are shown how to calculate the energy change for a chemical reaction using a worked example. Students will then need to complete a worksheet on bond energy calculations. The mark scheme for the worksheet is included in the PowerPoint for pupils to self-assess or peer-assess their work. The plenary task requires pupils to identify a WWW and EBI from the lesson, listing what went well/what they have fully understood and what they could do better next time. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE  (2016) Chemistry - Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, for more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience This lesson begins with a description of an exothermic reaction, including examples such as the thermite reaction and the screaming jelly baby reaction. This includes link to videos to demonstrate the energy transfers which are taking place during these exothermic reactions. Pupils are then asked to think>pair>share ideas about what an endothermic reaction might be and to come up with any examples if they can. Once students have had chance to discuss in groups, they can feedback to the class for a brief class discussion before the answer and examples are revealed using the PowerPoint presentation. The next part of the lesson requires pupils to undertake an investigation into different reactions, they will identify whether three different chemical reactions are either endothermic or exothermic bu measuring the temperature change for each of them. Students should follow the instructions included and record their results in the table provided. Students are now introduced to energy level diagrams to explain what is happening during an endothermic and exothermic reaction, they can sketch an example of each in their books for future lessons on energy profiles. The next part of the lesson will be a progress check, students should answer in their books and the work can be self-assessed using the answers provided. The last part of the lesson is on uses of endothermic and exothermic reactions in products, students will each be given a card of information. They will need to share their information with others to complete a table in their books to describe each of the products, identify if it is an endothermic or exothermic reaction and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages. The plenary task is for pupils to come up with their own product which uses either an endothermic or exothermic reaction. Thank you, leave any questions in the comment section :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry  - Electrolysis
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Electrolysis

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the ‘Chemical changes and electrolysis’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience Firstly, students are introduced to the term ‘Electrolysis’ including a description of the process, a list of key words associated with the process and a diagram. Students will now watch a video about the process, using which students will need to answer a set of questions. After they have completed this task they will be able to self-assess their work using the mark scheme provided. Students will now complete a fill-in-the-blank task to summarise what they have learnt so far, this can be assessed using the answers provided. Pupils are now shown a diagram to demonstrate what is happening at the anode and cathode during the electrolysis of lead bromide, pupils will need to use the list of key words provided to complete captions to describe what is happening at each electrode. Students can check their work against the example answers provided in the PowerPoint. Next, pupils are shown the ionic half-equations for the reactions occurring at the anode and cathode during the electrolysis of lead bromide. Pupils will then need to identify the products at each electrode, as well as complete the ionic half-equations, for the electrolysis of a set of ionic compounds: lihtium oxide, sodium chloride and magnesium chloride. Once complete, pupils can self-assess their work using the answers provided. The next part of the lesson focuses on the products formed at each electrode when the ionic compound is within an aqueous solution. Students will be shown what will happen at the anode and at the cathode, using this information they will need to predict the products formed at the anode/cathode during the electroysis of set of solutions. Students can self-assess their using using the answers provided. The final task focuses on the electrolysis of brine, students will watch a video and will need to answer a set of questions using the information provided in the video. After completing this task, pupils will need to self-assess their work using the answers provided. The plenary task requires pupils to write a ‘Whatsapp’ message to a friend to explain what they have learnt this lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
KS3 ~ Year 8 ~ Energy Stores & Transfers
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KS3 ~ Year 8 ~ Energy Stores & Transfers

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This lesson is designed for the KS3 Year 8 Science course, specifically the P2 1.2 unit on ‘Energy. The lesson begins with an introduction to the law of the conservation of energy, students are told that energy cannot be created or destroyed but it can be stored and transferred. Next, students are introduced to the five main energy stores, students are asked to match the correct names to the photos displayed. This task can then be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. Next, students are introduced to the ways in which energy can be transferred - via light waves, sound waves and electricity. They will be shown an energy transfer diagram, depicting the energy transfers which take place within a torch. Once students have seen the complete diagram, they will then have a go at completing it themselves, using the statements provided. This task can the be marked against the mark scheme provided. Students will then complete two further energy diagrams to display the energy transfers taking place within a candle and TV. The answers to this task are also included in the PowerPoint presentation so students can self-assess their work using the mark scheme provided. Lastly, students will complete an investigation into the height a ball bounces back up to after it has been dropped from a height. Students will work in groups of three, following the instructions provided on the PowerPoint to complete the results table provided. Students will then need to answer a set of questions using the data they collected from the investigation. This can be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. The plenary task requires students to complete one of the sentence starters, to summarise what they have learned this lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation, thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Rate of Reaction: The effect of catalysts
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Rate of Reaction: The effect of catalysts

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the ‘Rates of Reaction’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience This lesson begins with a video on catalyts, pupils will need to watch this and use the information provided to answer a set of questions. This work can then be self-assessed using the answers provided on the PowerPoint. This is followed by students sketching a reaction profile diagram into their books to show the effect of a catalyst on the activation energy of a reaction. In the next task pupils will be given some information on catalysts, they will need to read through this and use this to complete a place-mat of questions. Once completed, students can either self-assess or peer-assess their work using the mark scheme provided. Pupils will now work through a set of levelled questions on catalysts using data which is provided, pupils can then self-assess their work using the answers provided on the PowerPoint. The final task is a true or false activity, pupils are given a set of statements which they need to decide are true or false. They can write their answers down on mini white boards so it is easier to assess the whole class. The plenary activity requires pupils to talk to their partner, for a few minutes, about what they have learnt in the lesson today. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE Trilogy (2016) - The human nervous system
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NEW AQA GCSE Trilogy (2016) - The human nervous system

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Biology GCSE, particularly the ‘Homeostasis’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience This lesson begins by looking an organism - a cat- and asking pupils to think about the types of stimulus the cat might respond to in it’s environment, plus which organs it needs to sense these stimuli. Pupils will brainstorm their ideas and then self-assess their work once the answers are revealed, additionally they will answer an exam question on this topic. Next, pupils focus on the effectors and their role in the nervous system. Pupils will be provided with a description of the role of muscles and glands as effectors and will then need to complete an exam question to assess their knowledge, mark scheme provided for either peer or self-assessment. The next part of the lesson will focus on neurons, firstly a diagram of a neuron cell is shown and pupils need to think about how this cell is similar and different to a normal animal cell. Pupils may discuss this in pairs and try and come up with an answer before the mark scheme is revealed. Sensory and motor neurons are now introduced via an animation, pupils can look at the pathway the electrical impulse travels as it moved around the nervous system. Pupils will use this to then copy and complete a summary to describe this process, when completed this can be self-assessed. The final activity is for pupils to copy and complete a table to sum up the main functions of each part the human nervous system either by using a card sort or by putting the statements on the board. This can then be peer or self-assessed when complete The plenary activity is for pupils to summarise the 5 main key words they have learnt that lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE Trilogy (2016) Biology - The control of blood glucose levels
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NEW AQA GCSE Trilogy (2016) Biology - The control of blood glucose levels

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Biology GCSE, particularly the 'Homeostasis' SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The lesson begins by introducing the effects that too high or too low blood glucose levels can have on a person. This then follows into a couple of slides which outlines how the body is able to keep the blood glucose levels at a constant, firstly students will learn about the role of insulin and then glucagon in controlling blood glucose. Pupils will then watch a video which summarises what they have just learnt, this can then be used to complete a worksheet which runs through the steps involved with either lowering or increasing blood glucose levels. This work can be self-assessed using the answers provided. The next task is a summary table of the key words pupils will have learnt about within this topic, they will need to either identify the key word or a definition. This work can be assessed once they have finished using the answers provided. The next activity is a set of questions on the topic of controlling blood glucose, students should write their answers in full sentences and as an extra challenge could answer this in the back of their books and try not to look at their notes from the lesson so far. The next part of the lesson focuses on diabetes, pupils will firstly watch a video and answer questions about the causes an treatments for diabetes, this can be self-assessed once finished. The second activity is a past-paper question, pupils can answer this in their books and then mark their work using the mark scheme provided. The plenary task is for pupils to summarise what they have learnt today in three sentences. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry  - Finite & Renewable Resources
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NEW AQA GCSE (2016) Chemistry - Finite & Renewable Resources

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Chemistry GCSE, particularly the 'Earth’s Resources’ SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The lesson begins with a ‘Think > Pair > Share’ task, pupils will need to consider the definitions of the terms ‘Finite’ and ‘Renewable’. After a discussion in pairs and as a class, the definitions for these words can be revealed which pupils can write in their books. Next, pupils will watch a video on the availability and sustainable use of Earth’s resources, pupils will need to answer a set of questions whilst watching these videos and can self-assess their work once finished. Pupils are now introduced to a variety of natural resources which are getting used up by the chemical industry, students are given a list of these raw materials and are then asked to consider what factors might determine how quickly they may run out and the uncertainties surrounding estimates of how long they will last. After a discussion pupils can mind map their ideas, before the answers revealed and students can self-assess their work. Next, pupils are shown how to calculate orders of magnitude - the skill is demonstrated and then pupils need to have a go at tackling a problem. The next part of the lesson focuses on renewable resources, some examples of renewable energy sources are introduced and then students need to complete a task whereby they read information about different renewable fuel sources and have to sum up the advantages and disadvantages for each. Students can complete a table of their ideas in their books, this task can be self-assessed using the mark scheme. Finally, pupils complete an exam-style question on this topic and self-assess their work. The plenary task requires pupils to summarise what they have learned in the lesson using one of the sentence starters. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please email me at swift.education.uk@gmail.com and any feedback would be appreciated :)
KS3 ~ Year 8 ~ Recycling
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KS3 ~ Year 8 ~ Recycling

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This lesson is designed for the KS3 Year 8 Science course, specifically the C2 1.4 unit on ‘The Earth’. For more lessons designed for KS3 and KS4 please visit my shop at: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience. The lesson begins with a mind map task, students are given a definition for recycling and are asked to come up with a mind map of different materials which are able to be recycled. Students can discuss this in pairs and complete the mind map in their books, this work can then be self-assessed using the mark scheme provided. The next part of the lesson focuses on how aluminum is recycled, students will watch a video on the steps involved in the recycling of aluminum. They will then be given a set of jumbled statements, students will need to place the statements in the correct order to describe the method of aluminum recycling. This task can then be marked and corrected using the mark scheme provided. The next learning objective students will achieve is the ability to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of recycling. Students will need be given a card sort of statements, students will be requires to sort these statements into the correct columns - advantages/disadvantages. This task can the be self or peer assessed. Lastly, students will consider the limits to recycling, they will be shown a short video and will be required to answer a set of questions whilst watching. The mark scheme for this task is included in the PowerPoint so students can self-assess their work using the mark scheme provided. The plenary task requires students to spend a minute talking to the person next to them about what they have learned this lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation, thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)
NEW AQA Trilogy GCSE (2016) Biology - Monoclonal antibodies HT
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NEW AQA Trilogy GCSE (2016) Biology - Monoclonal antibodies HT

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This lesson is designed for the NEW AQA Trilogy Biology GCSE, particularly the 'Infection & Response' SoW. For more lessons designed to meet specification points for the NEW AQA Trilogy specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics please see my shop: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/SWiftScience The lesson firstly begins by looking at what monoclonal antibodies are and how they are produced, using a flow diagram the first slide goes through these details. The next slide is the images from the flow diagram but no description of what is happening, pupils need to match the statements to the correct part of the process. This can then be assessed. The next part of the lesson focuses on the uses of monoclonal antibodies, firstly pupils are given a set of questions about pregnancy tests which they will need to answer using a video. This can then be assessed using the answers provided. Pupils are then given a table/asked to draw a table in their book for the different uses of monoclonal antibodies. Pupils will then need to use posters which can be positioned around the room or on desks to fill this table in. The final activity is a card sort - pupils are given statements about the uses of monoclonal antibodies which are either advantages or disadvantages, pupils will need to write these statements into the correct column in their books. Once finished they can self-assess their work using the answers provided. The plenary activity is for pupils to choose two questions to answer from a list about the topic of the lesson. All resources are included at the end of the presentation. Thanks for looking, if you have any questions please let me know in the comments section and any feedback would be appreciated :)