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The Roman Baths, consists of the remarkably preserved remains of one of the greatest religious spas of the ancient world. The city’s unique thermal springs rise in the site and the Baths still flow with natural hot water. Visitors can explore the Roman Baths, walk on the original Roman pavements and see the ruins of the Temple of Sulis Minerva. The museum collection, located next to the bathing complex, includes a gilt bronze head of the Goddess Sulis Minerva, and other Roman artefacts.

The Roman Baths, consists of the remarkably preserved remains of one of the greatest religious spas of the ancient world. The city’s unique thermal springs rise in the site and the Baths still flow with natural hot water. Visitors can explore the Roman Baths, walk on the original Roman pavements and see the ruins of the Temple of Sulis Minerva. The museum collection, located next to the bathing complex, includes a gilt bronze head of the Goddess Sulis Minerva, and other Roman artefacts.
Writers in Bath - Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
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Writers in Bath - Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

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There are two addresses associated with Mary Shelley in Bath. The first is 12 New Bond Street (adjoining the bottom of Milson Street), and though Mary used this address for much of her private correspondence, she also used 5 Abbey Churchyard and its associated reading room to begin writing. In this fact sheet, find out how the locations, lectures and learning in Bath inspired Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein.
Resource pack for international students.
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Resource pack for international students.

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A series of 5 lessons based around preparing, visiting and reflecting on a visit to the Roman Baths, building language and comprehension skills. The first two lessons can be completed before / without visiting the Roman Baths in person, using the suggested video clip.
Writers in Bath - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
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Writers in Bath - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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There are two addresses associated with Mary Shelley in Bath. The first is 12 New Bond Street (adjoining the bottom of Milson Street), and though Mary used this address for much of her private correspondence, she also used 5 Abbey Churchyard and its associated reading room to begin writing. In this fact sheet, find out how the locations, lectures and learning in Bath inspired Shelleys’s novel Frankenstein.
Thomas Hardy - Writers in Bath
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Thomas Hardy - Writers in Bath

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Although he is more associated with his native Dorset, Thomas Hardy does have a few connections with Bath. In June 1873 he visited Bath with his wife to be Emma Gifford. She was staying in the city with Miss d’Arville who would chaperone them. He was inspired by his stay to write the poems ‘Midnight on Beechen,187_’ (1873), and ‘Aquae Sulis’. In this fact sheet, find out more about the city of Bath and how it inspired some of Thomas Hardy’s writings.
City of Bath World Heritage Site Hot Springs Activity Sheet
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City of Bath World Heritage Site Hot Springs Activity Sheet

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Bath has the only hot springs in the whole of Britain. There are three springs in the city centre, with 1.3 million litres of water flowing through every day. This is enough water to fill up your bath tub every 8 seconds! In this activity sheet, find out more about the hot springs, have a go at creating a fizzing bath bomb, and mix a rainbow of paint colours.
City of Bath World Heritage Site Monster Mosaic Activity Sheet
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City of Bath World Heritage Site Monster Mosaic Activity Sheet

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Some of the more fancy Roman houses (villas) and public buildings like the Roman bath house had floors decorated with colourful mosaics made from very small tiles called tesserae arranged to show patterns and pictures. In this activity sheet, learn about mosaics and have a go at creating your own monster-themed mosaic designs.
City of Bath World Heritage Site 18th Century Town Planning Activity Sheet
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City of Bath World Heritage Site 18th Century Town Planning Activity Sheet

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In the 18th century Bath became a fashionable place to visit and spend leisure time, catering for health and entertainment needs. The old walled Medieval town did not have the facilities or the space to house the visitors so the city expanded dramatically. Higgledy-piggledy Medieval buildings and narrow streets were cleared and Bath was transformed into a spacious and beautiful city. Terraces were designed and built in a uniform way using the honey-coloured limestone mined to the south of Bath at Combe Down. In this activity sheet, learn about the designing of the City of Bath as we know it today, and have a go at designing your own town.
Bath's 18th century architecture activity sheet.
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Bath's 18th century architecture activity sheet.

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Bath’s Georgian buildings are built in the ‘neo-classical style’, which was a fashion for using ideas of symmetry, balance and ornamentation from the past, many of which had been used in ancient times by the Romans and Greeks. Top architects of the day designed buildings for Bath using classical principles set out by the famous Italian architect Andrea Palladio in the 16thcentury. In this activity sheet, learn more about the details of Georgian architecture, and have a go at designing and building your own architectural columns.
City of Bath World Heritage Site Green Setting of the City Activity Sheet
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City of Bath World Heritage Site Green Setting of the City Activity Sheet

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Bath is built within the hollow of the hills. There are green views in every direction from the city centre. The countryside is very close to the city centre. The landscape was used by architects who built elegant terraces and villas along the hillsides as the city expanded in the 18thcentury. In this activity sheet, find out more about the green setting of the city of Bath, explore artistic interepretations of the landscape, and have a go at producing your own drawing or painting.
Make a Roman Helmet for Minerva
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Make a Roman Helmet for Minerva

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A short instructional video, part of our Art Club Series, that combines visual and written instructions to create a Roman style helmet, as worn by the Roman goddess Sulis Minerva. Sulis Minerva was the Roman goddess worshipped at The Roman Baths. You can see the statue of the Roman goddess in the Roman Baths Museum today.