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Canadian Winter Homeschool Materials

Hello! The resources here are suitable for students in classrooms, working one-on-one with tutors, or working with the help of a parent at home. They are simple, easy-to-use, printable PDF files. We hope you find something you like!

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Hello! The resources here are suitable for students in classrooms, working one-on-one with tutors, or working with the help of a parent at home. They are simple, easy-to-use, printable PDF files. We hope you find something you like!
'The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde' Reading Comprehension Sheets
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'The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde' Reading Comprehension Sheets

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About The Book ‘The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’ is the creepy tale of a man whose inner battle between good and evil becomes manifest in a most dramatic and surreal manner. It is considered a classic horror story, though the descriptions of violence in it are minimal - it is primarily the tragic end and the macabre language used that place it in this category. This is a classic novella which has become so well-known that it is common to refer to a person with two dramatically differing sides to their personality as a case of ‘Jekyll and Hyde’. Contents & Instructions For the purpose of this book, the novella will be read in eight sections of similar length. The novella is not included here - simply refer to the chapter headings to know what to read before completing the assignments. Following each section are reading comprehension assignments that focus on language and style. The student is asked: • to ‘translate’ two short passages into more contemporary language, showing that they have grasped the meaning of the language and can express the same thing as the author using their own words (If you purchase the version that includes the text, these passages are underlined.) • to familiarise themselves with a list of several words or phrases. These should be looked up or discussed with a teacher to be sure the student fully grasps their meaning. If you wish, you may write down a short definition of each. • to explain, in one or two sentences, a short passage from the text that includes some form of figurative language • to write a substantial paragraph in which the student observes the deliberate choice of language made by the author. A specific topic is given for each section.
Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in A Scandal in Bohemia
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Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in A Scandal in Bohemia

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Who better to show the usefulness of a well-asked question - and the importance of a clear and concise answer - than Sherlock Holmes? In ‘A Scandal In Bohemia’, Holmes finds himself assisting none other than the king of Bohemia! The problem seems trivial until the lady involved, one ‘Irene Adler’, proves to possess unexpected cleverness and charm. Could the great Sherlock Holmes find himself outwitted - by a woman? For young readers who are ready for their first Sherlock Holmes mystery (but who would rather not read about murders or ghosts), this story will surely entertain! Contents: • The full, original tale of ‘A Scandal In Bohemia’, divided into ten short sections Following each section: o Five questions to be answered separately in a student’s notebook o Vocabulary, in alphabetical order, with definitions or synonyms (making the word comprehensible in the story’s context), from the chapter just read o A ‘looking up close’ page, exploring one main theme of the section just read, such as cabinet photographs, what a bijou villa is, a Victorian wedding, what iodoform and nitrate of silver are, etc. (with pictures) Directions: • Read one section of the book at a time. Use the vocabulary list to help with understanding the story (and practise looking things up in alphabetical order). Answer the questions in a separate notebook. Read the ‘looking up close’ page for fun. Enjoy a good, old-fashioned, Sherlock Holmes mystery! Bonus! Includes a set of notebooking pages that can be used to answer questions, write out vocabulary, or in any other way you see fit!
Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in the Adventure of Silver Blaze
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Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in the Adventure of Silver Blaze

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Who better to show the usefulness of a well-asked question - and the importance of a clear and concise answer - than Sherlock Holmes? Join Holmes and Watson as they take to the fresh air of Devonshire in search of a horse thief – and likely murderer! When the prized racehorse known as Silver Blaze disappears only days before a race, Holmes presumes that the mystery will solve itself. After all, who could hide a horse for long? The murder of its trainer, however, requires serious attention. This story is suitable for young readers who are ready for a classic murder mystery! (There is a small amount of ‘gory’ detail.) Contents: • The full, original tale of ‘The Adventure of Silver Blaze’, divided into ten short sections Following each section: o Five questions to be answered separately in a student’s notebook o Vocabulary, in alphabetical order, with definitions or synonyms (making the word comprehensible in the story’s context), from the chapter just read o A ‘looking up close’ page, exploring one main theme of the section just read, such as Dartmoor, horseshoes, 19th century farms, walking sticks, etc. (with pictures) Directions: • Read one section of the book at a time. Use the vocabulary list to help with understanding the story (and practise looking things up in alphabetical order). Answer the questions in a separate notebook. Read the ‘looking up close’ page for fun. Enjoy a good, old-fashioned, Sherlock Holmes mystery! Bonus! Includes a set of notebooking pages that can be used to answer questions, write out vocabulary, or in any other way you see fit!
Essay Writing: Short Stories/Space Travel
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Essay Writing: Short Stories/Space Travel

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Compare and Contrast! The student will read two short stories about space travel, written in the 1950’s (included). A list of relevant themes for a ‘compare and contrast’ essay is included. The student will choose three themes that they feel are interesting, and write an essay in which they briefly address how those themes are important to each story. Detailed guidelines are given. This assignment will take at least one week to complete. Stories: . . . So They Baked A Cake A bitter, hardened journalist joins an elite space crew for an experimental voyage into deep space, a daring mission to find a planet that humans could colonize. They are travelling at one tenth the speed of light but the journey will still take 42 years one way in Earth time. The protagonist’s pessimism about humanity, and the crew’s growing despair due to the implications of the ultra-fast travel, are both confounded by an unexpectedly happy conclusion to their journey. The Lonely Ones A space crew is on an exploratory mission to find life on another planet – human or alien, they don’t care which. Discouraged by the lifeless landscapes of the planets in the solar system, they finally reach a new planet and land. Faced with an advanced society in which they will be treated as insignificant underlings, they decide to continue their journey further into space, though in a changed frame of mind. Note: The stories contain mild expletives, such as ‘what the hell’, and include mature themes such as references to drinking alcohol. TIP! This may be a good choice for a student with an interest in science fiction or futuristic literature.
Kung Fu Panda 'Secrets of The Furious Five' Self-Awareness Worksheets
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Kung Fu Panda 'Secrets of The Furious Five' Self-Awareness Worksheets

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What are the fundamental qualities that students of Chinese martial arts are expected to cultivate? Patience, Discipline, Courage, Confidence & Compassion! Like the points on a circle, there is no ‘first’ or ‘last’, no ‘more important’ or ‘less important’ when it comes to these powerful human qualities. They are all equally special and can be cultivated simultaneously, every day. Take a hint from Kung Fu Panda (which is of course based on thousands of years of experience and wisdom accumulated by Chinese martial artists and health experts) and develop these admirable and constructive qualities in your daily life! Contents - 2 versions of a ‘self-awareness’ sheet, which may be printed multiple times and filled in, to note how you have shown or will show all five of the qualities in your daily life - 5 ‘self-awareness’ sheets focusing on one quality only - ‘summarise and explain’ sheets for each of the Furious Five characters, to fill in with your own summary of events in the animated film shorts ‘Secrets of the Furious Five’ - labels for each quality which may be cut out and glued to a separate page or notebook, if you would rather make your notes elsewhere (or to use as you see fit) - a full-page poster for each quality, to serve as a friendly reminder
Character Description Literature & Composition
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Character Description Literature & Composition

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Here are six pieces of writing which focus on Character Description, and six different writing assignments to go with them! Topics include: a larger than life character from ancient times (Voltaire), describing a person of a certain age (Pushkin), using direct comparisons (‘as happy as’), describing someone whom you are in awe of (Queen Victoria meets the Czar of Russia), comparisons of temperament (Conrad), and short but memorable descriptions (Conan Doyle). Writing assignments vary – from describing someone from an ancient civilization to giving special attention to describing someone’s eyes, from using comparisons to make your description more interesting to writing a description in only a couple of sentences. An image of Picasso’s Portrait of Igor Stravinsky is included to be used as decoration on the student’s notebook. Literature & Composition collections are suitable for students who are ready to read and study different types of literature in small quantities. For example, instead of an entire novel or scholarly work, a small sample of each (which can stand on its own) will be presented. This way, the intermediate student has an opportunity to stretch their reading abilities without being discouraged. Each book contains six different writing samples that share a common theme. The writing assignments vary in length and are intended to inspire the student to try writing in different forms and styles.
Treasure Island Reading Comprehension (Extras Only)
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Treasure Island Reading Comprehension (Extras Only)

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Do you already have the book? Here are the ‘extras’ only. For each chapter, you will find: - Questions that focus on the reader’s experience and perceptions, and are under the title ‘Ask Yourself’. These may be used to stimulate discussion or for a written assignment of your choice. - Twelve words, typed in a suitably nautical style, which can be used as a spelling test (oral or written) or an opportunity to expand the reader’s vocabulary. (Definitions are not included. Outdated terms are generally not selected.) - A notebook page, imitating a diary page which Jim could have had in the time period, on which the reader should summarize (in their best penmanship and style) the chapter just read. Two pages of extra questions and activity suggestions are found at the end of the book. No pirate tale can compare with this one. Prepare yourself for subtle treachery, rough adventure, vivid characters and first class writing!
Activities for a Simple Summer
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Activities for a Simple Summer

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Learning to relax and replenish is a vital life skill! And learning to observe can help anyone, at any age, to improve your ability to complete tasks well. It will also help you to enjoy life, since much of what we experience amounts to many small moments all in a row! Every activity in this book offers a way to remember how to enjoy simple pleasures. Print the whole book, or just choose sections that interest you. Rather than trying to resist the slow and simple side of the warmest season, let yourself be encouraged to slow down, observe tiny details and make the most of a Simple Summer! Subjects: Water, Laugh!, Draw a Plant or Tree, The Sky, The Wind, Pet Rock, Decorate A Small Space, Garden In A Box, Simple Exercise, Clean Mind and Heart, Mini-Campfire, Tiny World, Travel At Home, Do Nothing On Purpose, Slow Down, Enjoy Your Food, Bird-watching, A Simple Poem
Learn To Knit: A Lesson Plan And Guide
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Learn To Knit: A Lesson Plan And Guide

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If you want to learn to knit, and you’re not sure where or how to start (or whether you’ll even like knitting), this guide may provide just the basic, step-by-step encouragement you need! Here you will find 48 consecutive lessons which will guide you to learn, practise and apply basic knitting skills. These skills are, in order: how to ‘cast on’; how to do the ‘knit’ stitch; how to do the ‘purl’ stitch; how to ‘cast off’; how to combine ‘knit’ and ‘purl’ stitches to make 11 different knitting patterns; and how to do three, more advanced stitches (‘yarn over needle’, ‘knit two together’, 'purl two together’) which will also be used in patterns. Labels are provided for each of the patterns, which you can pin to your finished samples for easy reference. Three bonus lessons provide basic instructions for completing a simple project: a washcloth or doll blanket, a hair ‘thingy’, or a scarf. Important: Please note that this is only a lesson guide; the lessons here only offer a plan for you to follow in order to acquire the skills you need, one at a time, in an enjoyable, encouraging, effective and satisfying manner. To learn the actual mechanics of knitting, you will need to refer to a handful of clear, full-colour, free websites (addresses provided), or to a library book or parent/friend. Knitting and other crafts (such as paper mosaics) are excellent tools for developing fine motor skills. This in turn can improve a student’s performance in other areas such as playing a musical instrument, writing neatly, attention to detail, patience, and the ability to concentrate for longer periods of time. Go slowly and be generous with your praise – fine work takes practise and perseverance!
Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in the Adventure of the Red-Headed League
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Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in the Adventure of the Red-Headed League

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Who better to show the usefulness of a well-asked question - and the importance of a clear and concise answer - than Sherlock Holmes? In ‘The Adventure of the Red-Headed League’, Holmes and Watson are presented with an odd and seemingly innocent set of clues. Why was the pawn-broker hired by the Red-Headed League – and so suddenly dismissed? It could be that there is more to this mystery than at first meets the eye! In fact, the fortunes of two daring thieves, and a fortune in gold, are at stake. For young readers who are ready for their first Sherlock Holmes mystery (but who would rather not read about murders or ghosts), this is an excellent tale! Contents: • The full, original tale of ‘The Adventure of the Red-Headed League’, divided into ten short sections Following each section: o Five questions to be answered separately in a student’s notebook o Vocabulary, in alphabetical order, with definitions or synonyms (making the word comprehensible in the story’s context), from the chapter just read o A ‘looking up close’ page, exploring one main theme of the section just read, such as pipes, what a pawnbroker is, transportation in Holmes’ time, the Encyclopaedia Britannica, etc. (with pictures) Directions: • Read one section of the book at a time. Use the vocabulary list to help with understanding the story (and practise looking things up in alphabetical order). Answer the questions in a separate notebook. Read the ‘looking up close’ page for fun. Enjoy a good, old-fashioned, Sherlock Holmes mystery!
Pride & Prejudice Reading Comprehension
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Pride & Prejudice Reading Comprehension

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This reading comprehension course introduces the reader to one of the English language’s most famous novels, ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen. For two hundred years, Jane Austen has been revered as a master of character study and story-telling. Her books unfold almost like delicious ‘gossip’, with the most interesting news about the lives of a particular family and its connections presented at a quick pace and in a most engaging style. Each book offers a window into the tantalizing world of balls, visits, families and conversations of late-18th century to early-19th century middle class England. Jane Austen’s novels often contain major plot developments in the form of letters, and Ms. Austen herself was a prolific letter writer – it is a form of communication that is central to the time, place and origins of these beloved novels. In Pride and Prejudice alone, more than 40 letters are quoted or referred to! Information about letter-writing in Jane Austen’s time (Pride and Prejudice was published in 1813), and the author’s own many letters, is included. Here you will use the medium of letter-writing as a way to digest, summarise and sometimes interpret the contents of Pride and Prejudice. Read Austen’s flowing, insightful and captivating prose. Then, following the guidelines (and occasionally doing some extra research), pass along the most interesting ‘news’ to an imaginary Dear Aunt, in letters written in your most elegant and accomplished style! Note: The full novel is included.
Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in the Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle
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Reading Comprehension: Sherlock Holmes in the Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

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Who better to show the usefulness of a well-asked question - and the importance of a clear and concise answer - than Sherlock Holmes? In ‘The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle’, Holmes’ great detective skills and Watson’s faithful support of his friend are at their most admirable. The disappearance of the famous blue jewel is easily explained . . . or is it? Set at Christmastime in old London, Holmes solves this case with his usual flair - and also, perhaps, saves a man from a life of crime. For young readers who are ready for their first Sherlock Holmes mystery (but who would rather not read about murders or ghosts), this is an excellent tale to start with! Contents: • The full, original tale of ‘The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle’, divided into ten short sections Following each section: o Five questions to be answered separately in a student’s notebook o Vocabulary, in alphabetical order, with definitions or synonyms (making the word comprehensible in the story’s context), from the chapter just read o A ‘looking up close’ page, exploring one main theme of the section just read, such as hats of the time period, how people lit their homes, the difference between supper and dinner, what betting is, keeping warm in old London, etc. (with pictures) Directions: • Read one section of the book at a time. Use the vocabulary list to help with understanding the story (and practise looking things up in alphabetical order). Answer the questions in a separate notebook. Read the ‘looking up close’ page for fun. Enjoy a good, old-fashioned, Sherlock Holmes mystery! Bonus! Includes a set of notebooking pages that can be used to answer questions, write out vocabulary, or in any other way you see fit!
Canadian Winter Homeschool Materials Sampler
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Canadian Winter Homeschool Materials Sampler

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Hello! Please refer to this file for small samples of each of the following Canadian Winter Homeschool Materials resources, in order to learn more about the types of resources we offer. English Language: Drawing for Better Penmanship ‘A Penny A Day’ Reading Comprehension ‘Insect Languages with Doctor Dolittle’ Reading Comprehension ‘Snow Treasure’ Reading Comprehension ‘Irish Fairies’ Literature & Composition Methinks I’ll Read Shakespeare: Julius Caesar English Grammar: Adjectival, Adverbial and Noun Clauses English Grammar: Perfectly Appropriate Prepositions French Language: 48 Dictées for Beginners 30 Dictées in the Past Tense 20 Intermediate Dictées and Tests 1 Intermediate French: 10 More Unit Studies Advanced French Reading Comprehension: Arsène Lupin No. 4 Advanced French Reading, Writing and Dictées: Les Chats
Daily Handwriting Practise Lesson Plan
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Daily Handwriting Practise Lesson Plan

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This is a guide for 90 days of handwriting practise. Four sets of pages indicate which letters or letter combinations are to be practised each day (instructions and samples included). For each day, four different words are also listed – these are to be used (one each) in individual sentences composed by the student. This type of daily practise strengthens the student’s hand, reinforces the memorization of how letters are formed both alone and when joined with one another, and provides an opportunity to practise basic sentence-writing with the simple guideline of a prescribed word. Also included: - A blank page of dotted lines for practise (print as many as you need) - Tips and Instructions - Samples of individual upper and lower case letters, and of letter combinations (how they join together in cursive script) Note: These exercises are suitable for students who already know how to write cursive letters. They are not suited to a rank beginner, who will find them too tiring.
Pride and Prejudice Reading Comprehension (extras only)
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Pride and Prejudice Reading Comprehension (extras only)

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Here are the 'extras' only - the student must use their own copy of the novel. This reading comprehension course introduces the reader to one of the English language’s most famous novels, ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen. For two hundred years, Jane Austen has been revered as a master of character study and story-telling. Her books unfold almost like delicious ‘gossip’, with the most interesting news about the lives of a particular family and its connections presented at a quick pace and in a most engaging style. Each book offers a window into the tantalizing world of balls, visits, families and conversations of late-18th century to early-19th century middle class England. Jane Austen’s novels often contain major plot developments in the form of letters, and Ms. Austen herself was a prolific letter writer – it is a form of communication that is central to the time, place and origins of these beloved novels. In Pride and Prejudice alone, more than 40 letters are quoted or referred to! Information about letter-writing in Jane Austen’s time (Pride and Prejudice was published in 1813), and the author’s own many letters, is included. Here you will use the medium of letter-writing as a way to digest, summarise and sometimes interpret the contents of Pride and Prejudice. Read Austen’s flowing, insightful and captivating prose. Then, following the guidelines (and occasionally doing some extra research), pass along the most interesting ‘news’ to an imaginary Dear Aunt, in letters written in your most elegant and accomplished style!
Essay Writing: Beginning & Concluding Paragraphs
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Essay Writing: Beginning & Concluding Paragraphs

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One of the trickiest parts of writing a good essay is composing a beginning and concluding paragraph that are not too similar – but that do communicate more or less the same thing. Here is an opportunity to practise just this skill. This eBook contains 15 paragraphs and 3 main essay bodies about different subjects. They can be used in any order. Each paragraph and essay has its own page, with blank spaces for the student’s work. The Paragraphs Each of the 15 paragraphs could either begin or conclude an essay. The student’s tasks are: - to write a second paragraph for each one that is similar but not identical - to label the original paragraph and their own paragraph indicating which one would be better to begin an essay, and which to conclude one - to identify and write down, concisely and clearly, the topic of the imaginary essay that the paragraph(s) would begin and conclude - to identify and write down the subjects of the three middle paragraphs of the imaginary essay, based on what has been written in the beginning and concluding paragraphs The paragraphs’ topics are as follows: skiing in the wilderness, Scotland, Gautama Buddha, William Shakespeare, Ancient Rome, French fashion, beavers, chocolate, toilets, human writing, water, rock climbing, essay writing, tomato sauce, believable scientific concepts from Star Trek. The Essays The 3 essay ‘bodies’ may be used as follows. The student should: - identify the main topic of the essay - identify the main topic of each individual paragraph within the essay - write both a beginning and concluding paragraph for each essay The essay topics are salt, cats, and exercise.
Essay Writing: Survival & Rescue
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Essay Writing: Survival & Rescue

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Compare and contrast! Here are two true stories of survival and rescue. With detailed guidelines suggesting how to proceed, the student will read the texts, choose an essay topic from several suggested, take notes, organise those notes, and write an essay. This assignment will take at least one week to complete. Stories: Tracks In The Bush An Australian ranch-worker goes missing, and three Europeans, along with six blacks, trek through the bush to rescue him. The tracking abilities of the blacks consistently astonish the narrator. He also describes the intense natural surroundings and the challenges, on a human level, that are faced by all involved. The Marvellous Ice-Drift of Captain Tyson This early attempt to reach the North Pole failed. The voyage nonetheless left its mark on history when the captain and crew were forced to abandon ship and live on an ice floe for 196 days in the middle of the Arctic winter. German sailors, an American cook, and a group of Inuit faced deadly conditions together. Under the leadership of Captain George E. Tyson, not one person perished. Note: To the best of my understanding the use of the word ‘black’ to refer to the indigenous peoples of Australia is preferable to them to the word ‘Aborigine’. Thus, the original term has been left unaltered in the text. If I am mistaken and have caused offense, please let me know! TIP! This may be a good choice for a student with an interest in outdoor adventures such as hiking, camping or rock-climbing.
Advanced French Reading, Writing & Dictées : Les Chats
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Advanced French Reading, Writing & Dictées : Les Chats

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This collection of French texts contains fourteen selections on the subject of ‘cats’, taken from Champfleury’s ‘Les Chats – Histoires, Mœurs, Observations, Anecdotes’ published in 1869. (Please note that although it dates from a previous century, the language remains appropriate for French written style.) Each two-page piece of writing addresses a specific topic in a thoughtful manner. Following each selection are: four reading comprehension questions, a dictée, phrases to translate, room for a vocabulary list and a place to write a ‘résumé’ of the text. The selections may be completed in any order – each one is unique and an effort has been made to avoid any repetition of vocabulary in the lists of phrases, so that a student may use this entire collection and continue to learn with each new topic.
'Jewel Mysteries' Reading, Research & Creative Writing
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'Jewel Mysteries' Reading, Research & Creative Writing

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‘Dark was falling from a dull and humid sky, and the lamps were beginning to struggle for brightness in Piccadilly, when the opal of Carmalovitch was first put into my hand . . .’ Written in an engaging style similar to that of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (author of the ‘Sherlock Holmes’ mysteries), these stories feature the entertaining experiences of a jeweller with a knack for solving mysteries, which he encounters as part of his unique position as a friend both to the wealthy and to the police. They will be of interest to readers who relish a certain Victorian type of atmosphere and plot that includes a fair amount of character study - in addition to being entertaining, they offer instructive food for thought regarding how greed and vanity affect human character. About The Book Six of the stories from the original collection are included here. They have been lightly edited (a few out-of-date terms have been replaced for clarity, such as ‘crowd’ in place of ‘crush’). Following each story are four possible assignments, which focus on descriptive writing and research. The student may complete as many of them as the teacher sees fit. The themes of the assignments are: a creative description of a place or concept; a creative character description; a long writing assignment involving retelling part or all of the story; and a research assignment related to the story (on the topics of jewellery, safes, precious stones, etc.). The student may also find themselves inspired to write their own mystery, in which case they can refer to Pemberton’s stories (or the plot summaries) for inspiration, their own completed assignments for ready character descriptions and accurate research, and the tips in the ‘Write Your Own Mystery, Tips and Worksheets’ appendix for guidelines and worksheets to help with planning and writing! Also includes a quick-reference sheet of images of precious stones, so students can keep an image in mind as they read.
Winter Bundle
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Winter Bundle

4 Resources
Here are four varied resources related to 'winter', suitable for students of different ages: 'Snow Treasure' Reading Comprehension sheets (questions and answers in three formats to go with the classic true story by Marie McSwigan, ages 8-10) Winter Literature & Composition (six pieces of writing and six different writing assignments to go with them, ages 11-13); Winter Reading Comprehension Collection (27 stories and poems about winter, followed by 'topics of discussion', ages 8-13); Snowflakes Mosaics Templates and Instructions (all you need to make old kleenex boxes or household cardboard into a beautiful seasonal craft, ages 7 and up).